What went wrong with my Gingery refractory?

Long story short, I've baked my lid in the oven but I'm left with
hard-packed and baked but not solid or rock-like sand. I used fireclay,
play sand and water only, exactly as the book describes.
After re-reading the Gingery section on curing the refractory, it seems
there might be another interpretation. It sounds like maybe "curing"
only drives out the water and then "vitrifying" makes it really solid.
Is that true? Or should I have essentially a millstone when I take it
out of the oven?
Pictures here, the last two items are mainly about the lid.
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Reply to
PhysicsGenius
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It seems to me (not at all a physics genius) that you had a mixture of sand, clay and water. When you put it in your oven you are simply going to drive out the water. This should allow you to move onto the next step, which is to put this lid fearlessly on over your oven and fire it up. At that point the clay should fuse and the refractory should harden. That's my guess anyway.
Back a few years you could email Dave Gingery. Don't know anymore. Someone on this NG will know about this for sure.
Nice blow-by-blow description.
Grant Erwin
PhysicsGenius wrote:
Reply to
Grant Erwin
See, that was MY guess. But the book isn't very clear on that.
That would rule. Maybe there's a mailto on lindsaybks.com.
Reply to
PhysicsGenius
Oh and thanks. There's a lot of detail left out of the books that nobody seems to talk about in their online accounts. I aim to rectify that.
Reply to
PhysicsGenius
So, where did you finally find the fireclay at? Did you find it locally, or did you have to have it shipped to you?
I've got an old water heater tank, cut in half, and a squirrel cage blower that I want to experiment with. I have a bag of perlite and would like to try mixing it with fireclay in order to get a better R-value coating.
One of the problems I had with an experimental charcoal furnace I was playing with was being able to re-fuel it on the fly without disturbing the crucible. In the more permanent version I'd like to add a re-fueling port and an ash drain. The re-fueling port will just be a pipe of large enough diameter to allow briquettes to slide down, on a steep angle from the outside of the furnace running to the bottom of the interior. A removable pipe cap will keep heat from being exhausted out of it during operation.
The ash drain would require the fireclay lining of the bottom of the furnace to be thick enough to have the forced air inlet positioned below the bottom interior surface. Perpendicular to the air inlet port would be another hole going right down through the bottom of the furnace. A hinged, spring loaded lid would be mounted under the furnace to keep heat and forced air from escaping during operation. A grate made of welded re-bar would sit in the on top of the bottom lining to prevent coals from dropping through and clogging the air inlet.
Crappy ASCII drawing follows (not to scale :-)
| | / /
Reply to
Artemia Salina
*Much* crappier than I had expected... I can draw up a JPG and post it to the dropbox later if interested.
Reply to
Artemia Salina
I found it locally, but at $15/50lb. It was at a tile/masonry store about 30 minutes from here.
This is a good idea and I've been wondering about that. I also saw a picture online where the whole body of the furnace lifted up on a lever system, leaving a platform where the crucible sat and the fire underneath. Or something.
Reply to
PhysicsGenius
Hmm. My version of IE gives an error attempting to load this page. Just me?
Jim
Reply to
Jim Wilson
Several other people have told me about errors. It's a 100% W3C compliant page, though, so any breakage is in the browser.
Reply to
PhysicsGenius
Works fine for me. I'm using Nutscrape 7.01 .. - GWE
Jim Wils> PhysicsGenius wrote...
Reply to
Grant Erwin
Could you please convert to HTML? XML seems to give IE 6 heartburn. When I click the link it asks me to download the file rather than opening it in the window as a normal HTML file. And when I open it from there it gets a style sheet error.
Tim
-- "That's for the courts to decide." - Homer Simpson Website @
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Reply to
Tim Williams
OK. Does anybody know how I can fix the problem?
Here is the error message I get:
I am able to examine the file, but know nothing about XML. For reference, the lines around the error are:
141 142 146 147 ]]> 150
I'm running IE 6.0, with all the service packs and critical updates installed. Any clues? (Other than recommending to change my OS or browser. (G))
Jim
Reply to
Jim Wilson
Greetings and Salutations.
Works fine for me, using Opera. M$ is not known for following standards, but, for trying to REMAKE them in their own image, so I suspect they are applying pressure by redefining how something works in IE. Regards Dave Mundt
Reply to
Dave Mundt
Jim, I have given up trying to get by with just one browser. I now keep IE around because some pages just don't work with Netscape, my main tool.
You can download Netscape for free - that will solve *this* problem. The current version of Netscape also can block popup ads. (WOOT!)
I have no idea how to fix IE. I get so mad at anything written by Microsoft I just avoid the whole issue anymore.
Grant
Jim Wils> PhysicsGenius wrote...
Reply to
Grant Erwin
No, I can't, as HTML won't let me include MathML, which I use occasionally.
Reply to
PhysicsGenius
Comes through just fine here. Mozilla 1.4.
clk
Reply to
Chris Kuether
Probably right, I'm using IE6 here and it's trying to save the file. It doesn't understand the .xhtml suffix....
Coming back to the plot, I dropped the .xhtml file off the end and got a directory listing (including pictures).
Everything looks OK, you need a dryout (which looks complete) then a serious high temp blowout to harden the stuff up.
Reply to
Duncan Munro
OK, so then the "curing" is really just driving the water out completely? And then it turns cement-like during the firing of the furnace body, right?
Reply to
PhysicsGenius
I got the idea just from you mentioning it. However, I found after firing the furnace to set the fireclay, that propane would be a tad less messy. My inlet was big enough to use the Reil burner popular at the time.
Joel. phx
Reply to
Joel Corwith
Unfortunantly this severly limits the amount of help you will receive.
occasionally.
Reply to
eli

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