What is wrong with this locomotive?

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Reply to
Ignoramus10926
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Ignoramus10926 fired this volley in news:wa-dnadbbPY-tlPMnZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@giganews.com:
I'm sorry. What did you see? I see TWO locomotives, one behind the other.
Other than that, only that some dimwit painted Pacifific on the one...
I see that crap all the time on even government appliances, whenever low- wage entitlement-minded people are doing the work.
Lloyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
Unrendered liberals at work!
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell
Interesting. Collison? Very little damage. Or was it cut in half to remove the engines?
Gunner
Reply to
Gunner Asch
That's what I meant.
They are probably not even low wage, this being a railroad.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus10926
No, proly Bibble-thumping midwesterners, talking in tongues, and stuttering. Affects their writing, too, apparently.....
Reply to
Existential Angst
Dats one long effing locomitive. Some are so long (6,000 hp) they can't navigate track whose bends are too tight, so are restricted in various parts of the country. I'll bet you get quite the chubby just thinking about scrapping dat muthafucka, eh?
Reply to
Existential Angst
Where is the rear of the foreground loco?
And notice where the engine room is?
Thats quite an interesting photo in more than one way.
Gunner
Reply to
Gunner Asch
Looks Photoshopped to me. The engine is too long by half.
Reply to
Larry Jaques
That is a 'Monster' - it is longer than normal and has a 'ventilated' rear power unit. Looks like the repair shop took a unit that smashed up the cab but had a good generator and made a monster for long coal cars or heavy loads.
Martin
Reply to
Martin Eastburn
Does it have two engines?
Reply to
Ignoramus10926
Somebody can't spell! :)
Front loco. and the one behind it have the same spelling error
Bob rgentryatozdotnet
Reply to
Bob Gentry
I did not photoshop it, I took the picture today
Reply to
Ignoramus10926
Looks like it is spelled right on the other side.
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It is on screen starting at 20s to 34s.
And it's correct here:
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Date: 11/4/2006 Location: Hot Springs (subdivision), UT
Also correct here:
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Date: 7/1/2008 Location: Railroad/Marshall, El Paso, TX
I can't find any other photos newer than last year and all of them seem to have it right. I suspect a repair with painted siding that didn't match.
Elijah ------ or photoshop
Reply to
Eli the Bearded
I agree with this assessment. Even so, they really should have immediately corrected or hid the misspelling to avoid a PR disaster.
Whether or not anyone at UP actually cares, is another matter all together
Erik
Reply to
Erik
How did you ascertain that??
Reply to
Existential Angst
I guess Martin was right and the Frankensteiners built it from two differently painted engines.
Reply to
Larry Jaques
I am also agreeing, this is most likely. It also seems to be longer than usual, which is something I do not really "get", it could not have a double engine or generator, so what is the point of making it longer?
i
Reply to
Ignoramus25172
It's probably the standard issue 4400 hp unit, or prthaps the 6044 convertable variant, fairly common.
"The AC4400 (or C44AC) was GE's initial entrant into the AC-traction market, and has proven extremely successful. Debuting in 1995, it has evolved into several different versions over time, adding power-management and emissions features to increase its flexibility and be more environmentally friendly and effecient"
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Reply to
PrecisionmachinisT
Nothing - they recycled some of the doors from another locomotive that had the lettering laid out differently - note the background yellow is more faded on the forward doors. They save everything that's still usable, and raid the boneyard for parts just like you do.
And the paint jobs are low priority, until there's a capital investment program to re-paint them al in a new color scheme. A lot of times it's "get it back in service and making us money" period.
The extra louvers on the rear doors might have been from adding dynamic braking resistors to a loco that wasn't built with them - you really don't know unless you have the shop records, or ask the engineer operating it.
That would be far from the first monster that a railroad has built - they took all the surviving EMD F series streamline locomotives and re-bodied them into freight locomotives, because you couldn't see for beans with the full bodies on them. You don't need to see close for mainline cross-country work, but you do for switching and siding deliveries.
They take locomotives with blown engines or wrecked bodies, whack off the body, and turn them into "Slugs" - powered trucks for climbing hills. At low speeds the generator in the locomotive is turning full speed and putting out full power - but the motors in the trucks can't use it all without burning up because they're creeping. (Even with external fan cooling.) A Slug gets power from the lead power unit locomotive.
Union Pacific even ran Gas Turbines for a while - Jet Engines running on #6 Bunker Oil pre-heated. And they parked under bridges and melted the asphalt off the road deck a few times... But when the supply of cheap heavy bunker oil went away (as they figured out how to crack and refine it into gasoline and diesel) so did they.
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Reply to
Bruce L. Bergman (munged human readable)

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