Gorton 2-28 milling machine

On 2013-04-17, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote:


You are milling on top of the knee, anyway./
i
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Ignoramus24865 wrote:

Not if you swivel the ram of a Bridgeport style machine, that can move the spindle well off to the side of the knee.
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Yeah, but Ig, overhang makes a difference. If you faithfully lock all the gibs EVERY TIME, you can cancel most of the tilt in the bed, but you can't do that if you need XY motion, only if you're drilling or spotting.
Lloyd
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Lloyd
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On Wed, 17 Apr 2013 12:59:00 -0500, Ignoramus24865

But..its a damned big and well constructed knee. Gortons are from 25%-75% heavier than an equivelent BP
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote in message

Exactly. If one is considering a knee type mill, they are amongst the best. They should not be compared to a bed type mill.
Harold
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote in message

Yep! I did get it back-asswards, but I thank you for your understanding.
I put my money where my mouth was when I made my purchases. I've purchased two BP's, both new. What I really wanted was a Gorton---but the money wasn't there.
I fully agree on the flexibility of the BP machine--that (and its relatively low price) is what made it so popular. It certainly isn't known for it's rigidity, but it is one of the handiest of all drop spindle mills to operate. With care, some very good work can be accomplished.
I did a lot of tooling work in my productive years. A great deal of it was for Litton Guidance and Control, building tooling for the guidance systems used in military aircraft. I served them for 16 years. All of it was accomplished with a BP mill, without benefit of a DRO. In skilled hands, they are quite capable----but they are not, nor will they ever be, the equal of machines that outweigh them by 1,000 pounds. That's been my point right along. You can't get rigidity without mass---and BP has a bare minimum.
Harold
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Neither a Goton or a Bridgeport are a "Rolls Royce". They both are serious compromises when it comes to rigidity. All knee mills are.
--

If I had Bridgeport, it probably would be sitting on railroad ties behind
the shop, under a tarp.
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On Apr 17, 6:02pm, "PrecisionmachinisT"

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"If I had Bridgeport, it probably would be sitting on railroad ties behind the shop, under a tarp."
Most shops I've worked for still have a quite a few Bridgeport Series I type knee mills for secondary operations, for odd sized, bulky pieces, for simple prototypes, for repairs and for making fixtures. Often they are fitted with a Prototrak retrofit.
"If I had a Gorton, I probably would have scrapped it about twenty years ago."
Most shops did scrap them twenty years ago and now put the kind of work the Gorton's and similar heavy duty knee mills use to be used for on a CNC mill that has a fully supported table.
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"Most shops I've worked for still have a quite a few Bridgeport Series I type knee mills for secondary operations, for odd sized, bulky pieces, for simple prototypes, for repairs and for making fixtures. Often they are fitted with a Prototrak retrofit.
Space is too much a premium in *my shop...and since I've done fine without having one for going on 30 years now, I've come to conclude that the return on investment just isn't there for me, and that it's much better from a business standpoint to just farm it out....
--focus on what makes the most money the fastest...keeping the machining centers busy...
Having to shell out $45.00 once in a blue moon to someone with a Bridgeport for an odd job is a drop in the bucket compared to spending $4 grand on a machine that'll probably end up costing me more in lost time sweeping chips and having to walk around it than it will ever recover.
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On Tue, 16 Apr 2013 19:54:01 -0500, Ignoramus9908

If it all works..you will absolutely love it.
Think of it as a Bridgeport on steroids
They are strong! and Stout!
And easy to put a DRO on. Z axis..not so easy...so Id suggest adding one of the little Z axis stand along DRO rails you can buy on Ebay for $30.
They have both a powered downfeed AND a crank downfeed, plus the standard drill press style downfeed lever
The next version..the 2-30 was converted to NC. Same machine..just upgraded with "CNC" controls
http://gorton-machine.org/machines/index.html
Gunner
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