Government Liquiddation web site

Interesting site, in Chambersburg, PA they are selling 14 rough terrian forklifts, 4 have less than 50 hours on them and most are
under 1000. All Army surplus. I have not way to move something like that, I just want to replace my 5000# electric with a LP powered one. Could you drag one on these things with a flat tire onto a lowboy with a whinch? how big a winch? Just wondering?
http://www.govliquidation.com/auction/view?auctionIdy10202&convertTo=USD
Remove 333 to reply. Randy
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I move this kind of stuff all the time. It is not complicated. You can drag them with a winch. Or with a truck. They might just start and drive. (but check all fluids).
Note the height of this forklift and figure out how low should the lowboy be to be under 13.5' total height. Alternatively you may just want to remove the overhead guard on the cab.
The bidding has not yet started and such items rarely sell very cheaply.
It is not a convenient forklift for general warehousing. It is very heavy for how much it can lift. It is more like a mini-loader.
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Ignoramus21707 wrote:

It's the kind I could use. My little 3k stand-up unit is great in the shop, but I could really use a 10K or better rough terrain unit.
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Oh, and be skeptical about hour meter readings
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wrote:

IF their hour meters haven't cycled. Sure it's not 100,050.0 hours? Your example is a 1981, so that's 33 years to accrue that many hours. Granted, lots of equipment was superfluous in the military, so it may be actual hours.

It's possible. The caveats are: ruining the tire (probably moot), ruining the wheel (slight possibility), getting it hung up on the lowboy on its way up, or puncturing a tire on the lowboy (depending on its style).
The thing has a 46,500GVW, so that's 23-1/4 tons you're hauling up a ramp. If it's not your lowboy, will the owner allow the drag on his unit? I'd want a very large winch to haul that aboard. What is the possibility of getting it running prior to loading? Take a battery or two with you, pour in some fresh diesel, and drive 'er up.
Another possibility is to bring your helo over and use the lifting instructions on the tag riveted to the machine. ;)

G'luck with a low bid, Randy.
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Larry, do not be such a scaredy cat, everything will work out with some ingenuity, wheels will roll, tire can probably be inflated, and if not that's OK, lowboys do not puncture tires, and EPA goons are not coming to execute you for that little oil dripping from our Toyota.
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On Thu, 26 Jun 2014 16:46:50 -0500, Ignoramus21707

Not that one, I don't think. Did you see all the pics? One had a tire which sported a popped bead and 4" of inner rim showing.

No, I was thinking something during the drag (rock under mangled tire) might puncture a _lowboy_ tire, not the other way around.

Huh? Where'd that come from?
By the way, when are you going to find a great deal on a Sikorsky SkyCrane so you don't have to truck all your finds to your warehouse?
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Yep

OK, how would dragging this harvester puncture a lowboy tire???
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On Thu, 26 Jun 2014 09:18:36 -0700, Larry Jaques

Not bidding on these,.... too big for me. I suppose an on site inspection would tell you if the hour meter went once around. I see new oil filters, I would expect the factory filters on a machine with 14 hours.
Remove 333 to reply. Randy
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On 7/2/2014 8:30 AM, Randy333 wrote:

...

...
Far more likely the hour-meters were replaced or aren't actually functional or both. The one on one of the utility tractors here shows about 300 hr now on a early '90s model tractor that was well-used when I bought it. It had been replaced and showed 20 hr or so when I bought it; I've replaced it once in the 15 yr since I've had it to keep it going so I can tell oil-change intervals...there's no telling how many thousand hours are actually on the machine, just as there's no way of knowing on these lifts unless there's some other maintenance log or some handwritten notes on the machines themselves. On the big tractors I put a permanent sticker on the dash each change so the old 4440 has a complete history going back to when it was new in '79...one would be unlikely to get so lucky on one of these, I'd surmise... :)
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They replace hourmeters in the army from time to time, such as when doing a major rebuild. People do it in the industry also. Hourmeters also break.
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Den 26-06-2014 15:33, Randy333 skrev:

If you are looking at the typical wear signs like mat and grips and for that matter the tires you might be looking at at rebuilt forklift or one that has 50 actual hours.
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Anyone bidding serious money should inspect the unit before they bid. Back in the old days of direct DMSO before the internet I was very active in bidding surplus from the Govt. The internet ruined getting a good deal on equipment. You had to know mil stock numbers and identify the stuff that was listed only by the number. I used to get stacks of fliers from DOD with all the equipment they sold.
On that unit you can bet it will go for at least ten grand. probably more.
John
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This is the essence of buying stuff at auction, to see and understand more than other bidders, and find good stuff where no one sees it.

You can search google for "International Harvester M10A site:govliquidation.com"
http://goo.gl/yRUXpD
This way you can research past prices. You could also search for
"International Harvester M10A Chambersburg site:govliquidation.com"
To see prices of ones sold at Chambersburg.
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wrote:

Somehow, I think the final bid will be a wee bit more than the $25 starting price.
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