Grizzly "cold saw"

"The H8723 utilizes dry (a.k.a. "cold") cut technology which will cut on
average three times faster than an abrasive machine"
1500RPM... maybe they missed a decimal point...
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Reply to
Louis Ohland
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No, that's the correct RPM. The DeWalt DW872 dry saw is 1,300 RPM. Their error is equating the "dry" saws with the "cold" saws. The true "cold" saws run much slower and use coolant and don't cause much of any heating at the cut. This newer generation of much cheaper "dry" saws run faster and do heat some, but much less than abrasive and they cut faster. The "dry" saws are like 1/10 the price of a true "cold" saw and work just as well for most uses.
Or perhaps you knew all that and were being sarcastic...
Pete C.
Reply to
Pete C.
Me, sarcastic? I never...
I see that the new dry blades are pretty good, but they still kick out the sparks...
Pete C. wrote:
Reply to
Louis Ohland
Nothing even close to an abrasive chop saw, or the grinder you'll probably be using on your welds later. The place where I get my steel stock uses the DeWalt dry saw to cut my sticks in half for easier transport and it does very nicely, even with a bundle of square tubing in one shot.
Reply to
Pete C.
I have the DeWalt - a few sparks, but might as well be zero compared to abrasive. I can set up the Dewalt anywhere, but the abrasive saw gets used mostly outdoors. One minor problem with the DeWalt - the chips (more like little shards) pile up in the vise angle-adjustment slot after many cuts. You pretty much can't change the vise angle until you blow the chips off. The table is OK considering it's sheet metal, pieces wider than the table tend to lie flat and cut reasonably square. Shorter pieces squirm a bit as the vise is tightened, so you need to keep a square and a hammer handy if you need square cuts.
Wayne
Reply to
wmbjkREMOVE
Just for snorts 'n grins... How enclosed is the blade? Perhaps a slow coolant feed would kill the sparks. Question is how would the blade react to it?
snipped-for-privacy@citl> >
Reply to
Louis Ohland
The retractable plastic blade guard covers the blade quite well until you lower the saw. It's open much like an abrasive saw when operating.
There aren't many sparks to kill, and they don't travel like on an abrasive saw. I haven't paid close attention, but I'm fairly sure the sparks don't even leave the saw's footprint. An acquaintance who put a lot of miles on a dry saw told me that they could extend the blade life something like 20% by shooting aerosol lube while cutting. Probably not worth the trouble for normal home shop use IMO. The lube could cost more than the savings on the blade, and might make for sticky chip piles.
Wayne
Reply to
wmbjkREMOVE
I don't even want to calculate the SFM for that. I run my 1 3/8" inserted end mill cutter at 1100 rpm. Something is whacked there.
Wes
Reply to
Wes
Perhaps, but they work quite well.
Reply to
Pete C.

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