Harbor Freight shop crane to list Clausing 9530 mill?

I like Richard's idea to use a harbor freight shop crane 35915
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber5915
to lift a Clausing 8530 mill into a trailer. I want to hear others' opinions about this idea.
i
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That crane is actually $169.95 at our local harbor freight. The boom goes 105" high.
i
wrote:

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I believe I bought that one. It was the one w/ the farthest/highest reach, non-foldable. For loading/unloading my pickup. I also bought a 2-year warrantee on the ram, for $35. Irks me to do this, but china, donchaknow... The ram itself is 8-ton, so they say. A lot of rams are 5 ton, which *nec'ly* limits the reach.
Even tho it's non-foldable, I believe it un-bolts into "flatter" sections than the foldables, which I store pretty readily under my fadal. I don't really have the room to have it standing around, even folded. But, occasionally I wish I had the foldable, just to spare myself the assembly/disassembly, even tho it's quick.
It's not great, but it's OK. I believe it's bigger than Pep Boys, positive it's bigger than the Sam's Club one (which seems much better built, is cheaper, got a load leveler, nicer colors, but seems smaller). May want to just look at the one at sams club. Non-swiveling front wheels, tho--see below.
But it would be *very good idea* to use it for your first job or two w/ someone who *knows what they are doing*!!!! I had the benefit of this, and STILL nearly dropped the goddamm lathe I was moving on the return trip by myself! Goodeffinggawd... still gives me the willies thinking about it. wow..... It is *very* easy for these things to become unbalanced! Altho it's nice/tempting to keep the "leg footprint" as small as poss, esp. in tight spaces, you must *constantly* check the "tip-ability" of the unit w/ the load you're carrying. Ask me....
Also, altho you could use these things by yourself, it's good to have a second person around, for a second set of eyes, if nothing else. Also won't hurt to ask a mach'y dealer how *they* would move a certain type of machine. Very easy to bust things up, w/o even dropping them. And each machine has it's own vississytudes, so don't get too confident w/ the success of one machine, when moving on to the next. Be even *more* careful w/ the second!
What you might appreciate about this particular unit is that the front wheels swivel, which on most of the other units I've seen they do not. May be no big deal, as they're proly easy enough to replace, but the swivel action of the front wheels can be pretty important in a move. Not great wheels, btw, but serviceable. You'll find yourself doing a lot of kicking/shoving/cursing.
Altho my nissan pickup proly has the shittiest v6 engine god ever put in a vehicle (let's hope it's at least reliable!), the combo of said pickup and hoist has saved me a fortune in rigging, and gives you permanent versatility/mobility in setting up shop. It's a great idea/strategy, as long as you are *very very* careful. ---------------------------- Mr. P.V.'d formerly Droll Troll
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Thanks PV. So, educate me, what is the true capacity of this crane with the boom fuly extended. Is it good enough to lift a 1000 lbs mill.
i
On Mon, 18 Apr 2005 11:37:05 -0400, Proctologically Violated

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Easy, no problem. You'll be able to see the flex in the smaller part of the boom. *Balancing* becomes much trickier w/ the boom stuck way out. Watch the legs!! Also, watch the markings on the legs, which indicate their maximum extension, which is surprisingly narrow in the back. Try to do as much as you can w/ the boom in.
Also wouldn't hurt to get a decent swivel hook/shackle for these things. Or, some heavy chain w/ the "replaceable" screw-type links, both at HD or any good hardware store, to make grabbing/rigging/strapping easier. Also note that you will occasionally need to "balance" a load, which needs much *less* heavy chain/rope/straps.
Oh, bleeve me, ahm no 'spert, I've done just a cupla moves, but boyoboy, what moves they were!! Goodgawd... Wish I knew more more! ---------------------------- Mr. P.V.'d formerly Droll Troll
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On Mon, 18 Apr 2005 12:24:38 -0400, Proctologically Violated

Yep, I will try to keep it as retracted as possible.

I have plenty of chain and shackles. Also lifting straps etc.
Thank you!
i

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Did your straps come with instructions? Particularly how to derate them when used on an angle? For example you warp them around something and put both ends on a hook. If the strap is at a 45 degree angle it can only carry 1/2 the rated load. cs
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wrote:

As an ex longshoreman and a rigger, that place where one was in harms way was refered to as th' *bite*. Never, ever, let yerself be placed in th' bite... you will get bit!

Escape route, always have one identified before th' lift. That means a clear path to safety, if there's some kind of an impedement, move it first! And don't do this shit by yourself, always have at least someone hold yer beer and a cell phone.

Indeed. And carefully inspect every piece of equipment used for th' lift. If it's straps and there's a few cuts in it, throw it away. Same with cables. If chain, are there any stretched links? Is th' hook and swivel rated for th' job at hand? If you aren't sure, don't use it!
I recently moved a Chinese 12" x 36" lathe (1/2 ton, new in th' crate) about 10 miles to my shop using an engine hoist at th' shop end. We had a car hauler trailer so it was pretty low. It was loaded at th' other end with a forklift. I brought my engine hoist there and double checked that it'd work at my end after it was loaded with th' forklift.
Had to use th' 1,500 lb setting to make th' reach, but it worked there so I knew it would on my end. It was semi-tricky because we needed to have it as far forward on th' trailer as possible for tongue weight. That meant taking some weight off th' crate with th' lift and *sliding* it back in smallish increments (6-12") at a time until we got a good center of gravity lift.
Three guys, about an hour on each end, and it was sitting in my shop. Th' engine hoist worked ok but th' lack of swiveling front wheels meant we had to muscle it around a corner... no big deal, just went low n' slow.
A mill is gonna be a whole 'nuther animal. It might take a spell to find th' right pick point so th' center of gravity is dead nuts on. Just take your time, lift it as minimally as possible, and go slooooow. A good life insurance policy isn't a bad idea either <g>.
Snarl
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I have one of the "2T" folding cranes, adn it has paid for itself twice over. I lifted all my machiens with it (Colchester Chipmaster lathe, Denbiegh horizontal mill, Tom Senior mill (350kg) and a Zuckermann-Wein 24" thicknesser. The thicknesser really made the boom bend... One problem you may have is getting enough lift, esp oon tall machines. Don't have the machien on the hook when you try to move it - it will tip. Use the crane for a straigh lift, drive the trailer away and drop the machine onto skates, pipes or whatever. Somoeone put the plans for machinery moving skates and low loaders in the Dropboax a while back. They will be useful if you have time to make them. Take pipes for rollers. A handwinch and some big crowbars are useful as well. Geoff
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That's what I am planning on doing.

Yes, I took my chain hoist with me, maybe it can pull horizontally also. Wil take the crowbar, as well.
i
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Pep Boys seems to have the same hoist on sale every weekend for $120 or so. I don't think that I'd necessarily trust the boom ratings, though.

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I would not trust them either, but the crane is rated for 2 tons and I will be lifting 0.5 ton.
i

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Its rated for 2 tons with the boom retracted. When you extend the boom all the way for added reach the rating goes down to 500 #. They dont tell u that in the ad.
Tony

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That's upsetting, but I am glad that you said that. Do you have any cites? I want to be very sure. This guy used this hoist to lift a Clausing 8540:
http://www.truetex.com/moveclausing.htm
i

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On 18 Apr 2005 15:06:00 GMT, Ignoramus7702

Shortest boom position=max capacity. This link has some numbers for a similar crane http://www.toolrage.com/prodView.asp?idproduct 38
Wayne
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I called Harbor Freight. For the non-foldable crane ($149), the lifting height (distance from hook to ground) is 117 inches. With the boom fully extended, the ecapacity is 0.5 ton, or 1,100 lbs.
That's good enough for me.
i
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Yep, dat's d' one! Their numbers are even almost correct! Little short of of 117", more like 108-110.I think. Mebbe they measured while the crane was tipping!! :) ---------------------------- Mr. P.V.'d formerly Droll Troll

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Well, I'm not an official "cite", but I can verify that a hoist rated at 2,000 pounds is only going to lift that much with the boom fully retracted. This will, of course, limit the height of the boom so keep that in mind.
The picture of the guy lifting the horizontal mill on the web site above shows the boom fully or almost fully (typically the 1,500 lb position) retracted.
Peter
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A-ha, that's very good (that he is doing it with the boom retracted).
Anyway. I talked to the seller this morning and we are shooting for tomorrow. Today, I will buy and assemble the crane, and tomorrow, I will rent a trailer and get the goods.
If he has not sold the 48" lathe for $1000, I may pick that one up also.
i
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On 18 Apr 2005 16:31:54 GMT, Ignoramus7702

The Rockwell lathe is a keeper.
Gunner
"At the core of liberalism is the spoiled child - miserable, as all spoiled children are, unsatisfied, demanding, ill-disciplined, despotic and useless. Liberalism is a philosphy of sniveling brats." -- P.J. O'Rourke
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