Help With Go/No Go Thread Ring

I am having a hard time finding a distributor that carries a 1/4-28 SAE-LT thread ring. Anyone knows who might stock it in the USA? Anyone knows what
the "LT" part pertains to? Nobody here seems to know... Thanks.
--
Tiziano



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Tiziano wrote:

Can't help with a distrubitor, but I would think LT stands for lefthand thread. Have you tried the usual prospects like MSC? Good luck. Bill
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what
Frankly, unless things have changed drastically since I was in the shop (entirely possible!), the thread designation would be something like 1/4-28 UNF (n)A (2A or 3A) I have no clue why it would include SAE (that's understood by the NF in UNF), and the LT means nothing to me. If you discover something significant in the LT designation, I'd appreciate you posting the information. The only thing that comes to mind would be the T standing for truncated. That's typical of the no-go.
Harold
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It's a lubrication fitting thread used in automotive and machine tool applications. Think zerk fitting.
IIRC, it's a tapered thread so there is no "go/not go" ring gages per se. You would need a set like those used on an NPT thread that not only do go/no go but also check length.
I would try Johnson Gage <http://www.johnsongage.com/
They are truly the thread gage experts.
or
<http://www.threadcheck.com/html/technical.html
--

Dan

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http://www.gfdsystems.com/14-28sae-lt.html

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SAE-LT
Thanks to Clay and Murphy for the enlightenment. I never fail to learn something new here.
Harold
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On Mon, 18 Dec 2006 08:51:27 GMT, with neither quill nor qualm,

Now will someone explain the difference between a lubrication thread and a regular fine (NF) thread?
- - Let Exxon send their own troops - -------------------------------------------------------
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http://alemite.com/catalog/details.aspx?identifier=fittings_14-28taper
The threads are the same, but the fit is better.In the aircraft business- most lube fittings require a 3b fit. Holes are drilled smaller than for a normal 2b fit. This allows more thread to engage with the fitting. We use the same tap (after testing in a test piece ). If by chance we screwed up and a 3b no-go gage would screw in a certain number of turns, usually 2 turns or more (depending on the depth of threads required) it would receive a reject tag and need to be redrilled and threaded for an insert. Hope this helped. Clay
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On Mon, 18 Dec 2006 08:15:07 -0800, with neither quill nor qualm,

That it did. Thanks, Clay.
- - Let Exxon send their own troops - -------------------------------------------------------
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Tiziano wrote:

I don't know much about gaging, just what I use for reloading, but when I have a question, I find that the tech support at vermont gage is very helpful. I email them directly from their website at http://www.vermontgage.com/tech/qa/question.html they also have tech articles and questions from others answered, so you may find what you are looking for already there. Now, if I can just get my loading bench cleaned off. Regards, Rider
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