How to build a file rack?



Even after AMF put them out, there were a lot of lanes with semi- automatic setters. You had to scramble to set three lanes. You first grabbed the ball and put it on the return ramp, then hustled to get all the loose pins out of the pit (or off the deck) and thrown into the pinsetter rack. They had semi-circular 'hoes' to pull pins out of the gutters when they didn't fall into the pit.
When the frame was over, you finished filling the rack, and manually actuated the setter to put them down. It was electric, but only for lowering and raising. You still had to manually throw all the pins into the setting holes.
The whole deal was to get it all done before the ball made it back to the line. A good 'monkey' could set three lanes, and make $15-20 a 4-hour night back in the 1960s. (that was a chunk of change, then).
This was after the time when pins were manually set on spikes that raised up out of the deck.
I bought my first car by setting pins at the local college's eight lane bowling alley. You got tips if you worked fast!
Lloyd
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pyotr filipivich wrote:

And now they troll usenet. :(
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11:50:53 -0400 typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

    Tain't like the old days, when there were jobs for which idiots were qualified. -- pyotr filipivich "With Age comes Wisdom. Although more often, Age travels alone."
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pyotr filipivich wrote:

Not true! We have a higher grade of idiot these days, and they can't do the jobs suited to the older model idiots. There just aren't enough low grade neurons available, to be able to give each idiot a full set.
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On Mon, 04 Mar 2013 17:26:31 -0800, pyotr filipivich

Snooker balls would be better as they are smaller than billiard balls.
Speaking of which..if anyone is interested in owning a very nice Brunswick snooker table (5x10') with an ebony base and very thick slate..an Admiral I believe..I have one for sale, complete with new felt, new cushions, well restored balls AND a matching set of billiard balls, cues, racks and a Ball Polisher!!
Make me an offer over $5k and Ill consider it.
Gunner
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in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

    Don't forget to include extra for taxes, and shipping & handling. Those fingerprints on the goods don't get there by themselves, ya know. -- pyotr filipivich "With Age comes Wisdom. Although more often, Age travels alone."
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On Sat, 09 Mar 2013 22:11:56 -0800, pyotr filipivich

True indeed. I recently rebuilt the hydraulic vari-drive components on that lathe. Clausing wanted $55 for the parts and $25 shipping.
The parts were O rings...6 of them. And would fit into a cell phones battery well.
I picked up a proper set of O rings, square profile, at a hydraulic shop in Bakersfield for $5...and they tossed in a complete extra set for free.
Clausing must have machined there $55 o-rings out of the skin of a newborn for that price.
Gunner
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in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

    It is all the documentation, to verify that these here O-rings are truly Original Equipment Manufacturer's O-Rings. You are not buying just nay O-Rings, you are buying "Clausing Supplied O-Ring"(tm, pat pend, nil obstat.) Sort of like how stainless steel parts double in price when the word "Marine" is added to the description.
    Plus the shipping and handling. And the secretary's time to personally type up the invoice.
tschus pyotr -- pyotr filipivich "With Age comes Wisdom. Although more often, Age travels alone."
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Have seen the PVC file rack in a few magazines. Just never had enough room to put one up. My dad's place had a workbench with a file rack, just a piece of lath tacked over some spacers at the bottom of the tool rack on the wall. Wouldn't take a whole lot of weight and needed a 1x2 below so the handleless ones didn't slip through but worked for 40 years. Small files got stuck tang-first into holes drilled in the 1x2.
Stan
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I made two wall racks for them. The one for the files I use most is a sheet aluminum U channel with nibbled slots far enough apart that I can grab the handles. It also holds the dial caliper. The second, denser one is a plank with two columns of angled finishing nails, for the less commonly used files with no or smaller handles (wire nuts etc). The excess and large taps and reamers are in drawers inside heatshrink tubing or taped cardboard sleeves. I brush them clean before putting them away so the heatshrink won't be contaminated with conductive metal particles when I need it for wiring.
Then there is one of these near the mill and over the lathe for their files, brushes, screwdrivers and wrenches:
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31rU-1XXmhL.jpg
The tools in the front row keep the lathe toolholders on the back step from sliding off. It's a convenient place to put the chuck key. A row of L hooks under the lathe rack holds spring calipers and square-hole Armstrong wrenches. jsw
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On Fri, 1 Mar 2013 07:35:26 -0500, "Jim Wilkins"

Thanks!
Ive got a couple of those red tool holders tucked up here and there. One in the shop is identical to yours, another is a blue one with a bit better layout and is pegboard compatible, in the electronics shop
Gunner
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wrote:

I'm finally getting around to putting handles on my older files. It makes a much more usable file.

Got a spare Nicholson 49 (or 50) in that stock you'd like to part with? How much do you want for it?

So drill them. 'Taint rocket surgery. Hanging is the best way I've found. Pound some 16d nails through a tubafore and mount that to the wall. Grind the points off the nails and bend them up slightly to hold the files.
Another possible way is taking lengths of PVC pipe and sticking them in that. Tie 'em together with a band clamp and make them short enough to see the file tooth pattern on each.

Nice!

A woodworking buddy (Steve Knight, a retired hand plane maker from Portland) used a service in HelL.A. area, Boggs Tool. He liked the results. http://www.boggstool.com/page5.html

Soft, sticky types of aluminum are hell to get off files, aren't they? I hate that. Doesn't lye eat aluminum?
--
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-- Stephanie Barron
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On Fri, 01 Mar 2013 06:35:55 -0800, Larry Jaques

I may have a couple 49s..not sure about the finer 50. Free to you of course, if I have them.

I dont have an EDM machine to drill them. Oh..the handles. Blush..

Yaknow..thats not a bad idea at all. Ill check into that!! Indeed!

Boggs is one of the names. And its in my service range.

Thats what Ive been considering using. Got some Draino in the lue..might make up a bit and soak the bad ones.
Ive been cleaning and oiling the files..yeah..not supposed to oil them. Shrug. Got some very very very light gauge oil in a spray can that lost its propellent so popped a hole in the can and put it into a pump oil can. Paint brushed em with that gauge oil and set a bunch of them in a small plastic tub last night and let em drain. More today.
Its a very very light oil. Runs like water. Almost kerosene.
If I find the oil to be an issue if I use one..got carby cleaner at hand all the time. Spritz and the oil is gone.
Gunner, making a note to check for #49/50 rasps
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wrote:

Larry...got (1) Nicholson #49 and a Tome (Portugese) version of the #50. The Tome is not as sharp as it should be..shrug..but it will still cut well enough.
Email me your shipping address and Ill see about getting them out to you.
http://www.tomefeteira.com/
You will need to find your own handles...chuckle
Gunner
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wrote:

Hey, that's great!

I think I can handle that. Let me know how much to send you for the shipping.
--
When a quiet man is moved to passion, it seems the very earth will shake.
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wrote:

Most Excellent, sir. Shall I send you a box of Femtex Bullet Hole Plugs for the trouble? <bseg>
http://firstquality.com/Images/product-rollovers/P-T-003_m.jpg

Hanging is best since you can see the tooth pattern completely.

Yeah, I figured you'd be close to there when working in the blighted area.

Or bake it off?

Danke mucho, monsieur.
Watch your email for Obama cartoons from Over There.
--
When a quiet man is moved to passion, it seems the very earth will shake.
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On Thursday, February 28, 2013 11:23:25 PM UTC-8, Gunner wrote:

I make cardboard scabbards for 'em, with staples on the seams (and if I think of it, a tape wrap to keep the staples from biting). Then it's OK to pile 'em in a drawer.
Biggest drawback: they all look alike in the scabbards, so there's a few minutes sorting through the collection to find the right shape and tooth for a job.
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On Fri, 01 Mar 2013 12:04:56 -0800, whit3rd wrote:

With a heat sealer (like, eg, "Impulse Heat Sealer 12 Inch", <http://www.ebay.com/itm/Impulse-Heat-Sealer-12-Inch-/251237125610 ) you can divide plastic bags etc into parallel pockets. Eg, top-loading polypropylene notebook sheet protectors divided into 3 or 4 pockets are ok for storing files. The translucent bags from cereal boxes work ok too.
--
jiw

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On Fri, 1 Mar 2013 20:14:01 +0000 (UTC), James Waldby

Hey! Thats good too! I have a sealer..couple of them in fact.
Thanks!
Gunner
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wrote:

They wouldn't last long, but that would work.

Rather than buy a $100 tool, I found some 6" x 9" x 8mil poly bags and am using them to sort stuff in my BOB. A straw inserted into them sucks out excess air and low-vacuum seals them.
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