Hybrid cordless (but wired) battery-powered tools?

As mentioned many moons ago... I modified a Dremel rotary tool to use Bosch batteries. Bosch includes a real charger, and the
batteries last longer per charge. The battery plugs and unplugs into a wire that goes to the rotary tool. So the weight of the battery is not felt at the tool. It's like both corded and cordless, the battery is carried and must rest on something or sit in my pocket.
Have used it many times. Works great. They rotary tool is extremely light and easy to handle/control, without the battery stuck into the case. Much easier to control than using a flex shaft.
I'm not suggesting the idea is novel concept. Long ago, my dad stuck a light on the barrel of a rifle. The battery was kept in an Army belt, with a wire going to a plug in the stock of the rifle.
Any cordless (but wired) tools offered like that? Might not be a big deal when using a power drill, when you might be concerned about sudden torque damaging your wrist or arm. But it's great for a rotary tool.
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John Doe wrote:

There are a few items like that sold for rescue work. Saws and such where the small battery packs don't last long enough to finish rapidly. Also a few others.
--
Steve W.

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"Steve W." <csr684 NOTyahoo.com> wrote:

Any pictures? Any names? Any keywords? Ever see one?
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John Doe wrote:

I've considered opening the battery-box of a cordless tool and replacing the dead battery pack with a suitably-sized transfomer and small rectifier circuit. That way, if the charge on the working tool gives out, AND I have access to 120v, I can keep going with only a small inconvience.
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wrote:

Replace it with a male plug..and put your transformer and rectifier in a box with a power cord and plug for the wall.
Its much easier to find a place to heat sink and mount in a small box..then it is to find a place in the drill.
Seriously
Gunner
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Gunner wrote:

Good idea. Thanks.
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the

e
Pack the box with supercapacitors or an LM350-based linear supply. The LM350 (beefier, 3 amp version of the LM317T regulator) voltage is easily set with 2 resistors.
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On Thu, 24 Jan 2013 22:18:28 -0700, Father Haskell wrote (in article

Make sure the motor draw doesn't exceed 3 amps (most battery operated tools do just that at peak loads). The "T" cased regulators will require a substantial heat sink to operate continuously over 1 amp. If I remember correctly, they have a typical voltage drop of 1.2V.
I posted a picture a while back of a Dewalt drill (12volt I believe) fitted with a switching power supply built into the battery pack. A nice way to swap between cordless and corded.
Also consider the large number of cheap switching power supplies on the market. I use 12V laptop chargers (6 amp) for LED cabinet lighting. They have nice, durable cases and can be had for $10 on sale from a number of places (mcmelectronics.com for one)
You can also get a number of different voltage 'wall-wart' type switchers for real cheap. Unless you have a suitable transformer (and case) handy, going with a switcher will provide more power that a linear supply in a smaller package.
-Bruce
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As for Computer Power Supplies...one may find them free or nearly so by simply looking in the phone book for "computer recycliers"
Several that I visit regularly will have several cubic Yards of them on hand, ready to be run through the shredders and I can take a clothes basket full of them for little or nothing
Gunner
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ng the

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Drawing more than 3 amps will just shut down the regulator until load is removed. Adding a pass transistor (or several) should remedy the problem.

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What does a cheap auto battery charger go for? Handy for other things besides powering a drill, such as derusting old iron.
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On Mon, 28 Jan 2013 00:40:16 -0700, Father Haskell wrote (in article

Not exactly what I'd call portable, but you can get battery chargers (new) for about $10 They usually have a funky voltage regulation curve so speed control may act weird but it would be worth trying.
-Bruce
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Den 22-01-2013 01:49, John Doe skrev:

Dremel is owned by: Bosch ;-) Look at the copyright line at the very bottom of this page: http://www.dremel.com/Pages/default.aspx
--
Uffe

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Uffe Brentsen <leiti_FJERNES_ hotmail.com> wrote:

Okay...
--





> Look at the copyright line at the very bottom of this page:
> http://www.dremel.com/Pages/default.aspx
  Click to see the full signature.
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