I saw an incredible steam forging hammer in Chicago

Totally shocking size of this hammer, and incredible operation.
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Reply to
Ignoramus22513
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That looks like a hammer I saw at Finkl Steel in Chicago, 40 years ago. It was forging billets of tools steel, a bit larger than the piece in your video.
Finkl moved and has modernized its equipment, so it's probably not the same hammer. What company is that?
Reply to
edhuntress2
Damn, I miss Finkl. Their old plant used to be about a mile away from me. When ever I was jonesing for some heavy industry, I would run up to Finkltown and watch real men bend raw elements to their will. On a good day, the Finklmobile would roll across Cortland carrying a giant red hot billet of steel. From thirty feet away, the radiant heat through your windshield was like climbing inside a hot oven.
Paul K. DIckman
Reply to
Paul K. Dickman
WOW, had no idea such gear was still in use! What the heck were they making?
Jon
Reply to
Jon Elson
I stood on a catwalk maybe 40 feet away from one of those billets, and I had to turn away from the heat. That was a real "Giants of Industry" operation.
Reply to
edhuntress2
It was impressive Because their operations were on both sides of the street, sometimes they had to haul it between two buildings. You would just be sitting at the stoplight when this thing,
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would roll across the street with a glowing chunk of steel, bigger than a refrigerator, slung under it.
The first time it happened, you would get out of the car to see if the heat blistered your paint.
Most days, the doors to their forging operations were wide open. I could stand on the sidewalk and watch 'em for hours.
Paul K. Dickman
Reply to
Paul K. Dickman
Reminded me of the Creusot Steam hammer in France which I read about recently in Model Engineer
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.
Reply to
David Billington
Gunner Asch on Thu, 07 Jun 2018 14:19:20 -0700 typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:
Yeah, but there is something satisfying about just hitting it with a bigger hammer.
I mean, a really, really bigger hammer. -- pyotr filipivich "With Age comes Wisdom. Although far too often, Age travels alone."
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
Area is what, 10' x 10'? What's the total force work out to?
Reply to
Mayla
The highest pressure presses can fit in your hand:
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640 GPa = 93,000,000 PSI
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
Yes, it is amazing how people work there all day!
Reply to
Ignoramus30696
"Ignoramus30696" wrote in message news:1NWdnSuKbrg8 snipped-for-privacy@giganews.com...
In the blacksmithing class we discussed how some people perceive what was an interesting hobby for us as a vision of Hell.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
You appear to be mistaken. Because that's only 46,500 tons psi, more than 20% less than Gunner's example. He says he does engineering every day
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so he must be up on these things. Perhaps he could suggest somewhere for you to get some remedial training. Best to avoid the embarrassment of claiming some dinky thing has the highest pressure when we have it on good authority that much higher pressures are achieved on a warehouse-sized device.
BTW, does anybody know what they're doing with triple the pressure of the Earth's core, at a warehouse in California? Some kind of advanced cubic zirconia factory?
Reply to
Mayla
The thing is, he doesn't know the difference, and that's what allowed him to show off by throwing in the gratuitous psi, and then confirm his bewilderment by repeating the claim. Wilkins or Ig could surely have done him the charity of setting him straight but apparently they prefer to watch him flounder. By now Wieber realizes he made another ludicrous blunder, but he still can't tell what it is despite all the hints. The "engineer" equivalent of a deer in the headlights. In the dull-knife analogy, he's a spoon. Maybe he can make it to spork if he lives to 200.
Reply to
Mayla
Wieber continues his attempts to "prove" the existence of his mythical 60k ton per sq. in. press.
Nope. That's a 40k tons press. Not 60k ton per sq. in.
Nope. That's a 60k ton press. Not 60k tons per sq. in.
Try again, moron. Have you considered learning the difference between total force and force per sq, in.? Just a thought...
I feel sorry for any teacher who ever attempted to penetrate Wieberskull.
Reply to
Dear Believer
I'm guessing he still isn't going to get it.
Reply to
Rudy Canoza

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