Its a Maytag

My Sears brand washing machine lasted 24 years. Came with a GREAT
manual and the couple repairs it needed were a piece of cake.
Milady upgraded to a high efficiency front load Maytag two years ago.
A couple days ago it blew a fuse mid cycle and she couldn't even open
the door. It had all my britches in it and my one remaining pair was
getting pretty rank so she had the local repair guy out.
he said ya, no repair manual to be had. Normally a tech sheet is taped
inside the machine but not the case on this one. He didn't know how to
repair it unless we call Maytag. he also said cost is likely the same
as a new one. So, we should just throw it away. its a model
MHWE200XW00 serial HL12229330 FWIW.
Say it ain't so Joe.
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
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Wait, don't tell me ... it's a "Neptune", right? I've heard a lot about problems with them. Also, I've seen quite a few at our dump - looking brand new, but at the dump for a reason.
Google "maytag neptune problems"
Good luck ... I'm sticking with the old Maytags.
Bob
Reply to
Bob Engelhardt
snipped-for-privacy@rahul.net (Edward A. Falk) on Wed, 21 Aug 2013 17:57:36 +0000 (UTC) typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:
Not necessarily. Washing machines have been going downhill as the manufacturers attempt to complies with government mandates on how much water they use. Never mind that a top-loading washer uses less water than running a front loader twice to get things clean - it is all about how the Environmentalists feel about making others save the planet. -- pyotr filipivich "With Age comes Wisdom. Although more often, Age travels alone."
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
Google returns several hits for manuals and parts sources for that model. Art
Reply to
Artemus
I have a pair of first gen neptunes. Bought them 14 years ago. The washing machine had the infamous burnt up wax motor-control board. Fixed that. Bearings went out a couple years later. Had to make a bearing puller/seater and fixed that. Bearings just went out again a couple of months ago, changed them again. Dryer needed a new igniter several years ago, changed that. New motor and glides a few months ago.
I tend to prefer living with the devil I know rather than the devil I don't know.
Reply to
Jim Stewart
Jim Stewart fired this volley in news:kv38bt$pn4$1 @dont-email.me:
I HAD a pair. Four months in, the bearings failed in the washer. A year later, they failed again. The electronics failed; replaced.
The dryer is still running, but rumbling on its drum bearings badly.
Both, under five years old.
Almost any 1980's vintage Kenmore upright you can point to is still in service.
We replaced the washer with an upright. The dryer will go soon.
German, ours, not Chinese. Sort of the VWs of their ilk.
Lloyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
My favorite old curmudgeon of an appliance parts guy told me to keep my 10 yo. Maytag running for the rest of my life! He said parts will most likely be available forever. It hasn't failed at all yet (knock on wood), it only came up in conversation when I had to buy a relay for my Maytag fridge from him.
All my friends with the "new" washing machines complain that they stink. Why is that?
Reply to
Tom Gardner
FWIW, the Maytag stove I bought about 25 years ago has sucked from day 1.
But, as far as retrieving your britches: From a web site:
There should be tech notes under the top cover or inside the lower service panel.
If not, or you cannot get to it, here are the instructions for a manual unl ock from the tech notes.
Manually Unlocking the Door Lock System 1. Unplug washer or disconnect power. 2. Remove the top washer panel. 3. Reach down along the inside of the front (between tub and CCU) and locat e the top of the door switch/lock assembly. 4. Located on the top of the door switch/lock assembly is a ring-shaped tab . 5. Gently pull the tab upward about ¼" or until a click is heard. 6. The door may be opened.
Read more:
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Reply to
rangerssuck
The low water usage machines constantly recirculate the water with a pump. (the old ones just fill and slosh the drum). This requires a small tank and a valve. There is no way to completely flush these out at the end of the wash and the dirty water that gets trapped gets stinky.
If people need a new washer, I suggest they spring the extra dough for a commercial machine. They are simple, rugged and easily repaired.
Paul K. Dickman
Reply to
Paul K. Dickman
Good thing it was the opinon of your appliance parts guy and not your doctor!
They even sell special detergents to combat the stink (I imagine they are not cheaper than regular detergents in loads per $).
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Best regards, Spehro Pefhany
Reply to
Spehro Pefhany
We've had a Neptune front loader for about 14 years and it's never stunk due to a simple procedure we do. Art
Reply to
Artemus
I'd say that you should cut your losses and move on. Or is it a case of "the devil you know". Bob
Reply to
Bob Engelhardt
They've gone downhill. We've got a Maytag we bought in about 1976 (or was it 1975?). Anyway -- 37 years or so on it and the dryer. We had to replace the heating element in the dryer once -- because too much lint built up in the exhaust vent.
Granted -- we never had kids, so the load was not what we would have otherwise.
Good Luck, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
Nah - it's just been a matter of priorities. As it happens, a friend is moving from her house to an apartment in a couple of weeks, and I'm getting her five year old stove that has igniters that actually work.
I wonder how big a difference it will make in my life to not have to light the stove manually?
Reply to
rangerssuck
If your front load washer smells - you can run a cycle with bleach or white vinegar through the machine. And spray the front boot with vinegar if there is any mold.
Reply to
marketingactiveapp
I was able to determine the micro processor was fried... - $165
But it blew a fuse when it first went down, telling me the processor likely fried after whatever initial failure went out. So, we scrapped out a two year old machine.
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
I'm hoping my Kenmore top loader lasts a day longer than me. I really don't care if a front loader uses less water. I put that water in the ground about 100 feet from where I draw it. Pretty much closed loop.
But Washington wants a solution for the metroplexes and doesn't give a chit about the fly over people that can do fine w/o their 'help'.
Wes
Reply to
Wes
Wes fired this volley in news:%GtVt.2177 $ snipped-for-privacy@en-nntp-06.dc.easynews.com:
'Hope it's an old one. The ones made prior to about 1993 had really solid guts. After that, everything went "lightweight"... plastic pumps, thinner drain boots, cheap Chinese timer switches.
We had a 1972 Kenmore until 2005, when wifey decided it was "worn out". (it was ugly, but worked perfectly). So we went with a Maytag front- loader, and ditched it after two years and four MAJOR failures, one of which would've cost over $1100 to repair, if it hadn't still been in warrantee. Even in that, Maytag would not honor it, because even though we 'registered' the washer when we bought it, we didn't have the _original_ receipt from Lowes (which was on thermal paper, so probably wouldn't have been readable after that time).
Lowes made it right; they handled it under their 'blanket' warrantee service. Plus one for Lowes, -7 for Maytag.
Now we have a much more modern upright, and it's built to last _maybe_ five years. Cost more than the '72 Kenmore, too!
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
I now wish i had rebuilt that Sears machine i tossed two years ago.
Reply to
Karl Townsend
...
I see the back side of that story at our dump: old Maytags that still work perfectly, but are "old". I know that they work perfectly because I take them home, check them out, and use them in my apartment building. There they get used by 6 people for years until they get a leak or something and get replaced by the reserve one that's been sitting in the corner.
Some day we'll simply run out of those old Maytags, but with any luck I'll be dead by then.
Bob
Reply to
Bob Engelhardt

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