Lathe rebuild



    Having now checked it out (after verifying that I could traceroute to the site, since I have a lot of .br blocked), I agree. There was absolutely nothing in there which should require Flash to display. Plain HTML would suffice for the while thing.
    And this is the first site which I have found which required Flash, but did *not* require JavaScript at the same time.
    But what in the world is an English-language only lens review doing in a site in Brazil?

    And that seems to happen when Flash starts.

    :-)
    I wonder whether it would work with Opera if I turned on either "Identify as Explorer" or "Mask as Explorer". (I'm not sure what the distinction is, but both are there.)

    That was some time ago. They long ago went to fully free for everyone, with no ads.
    With the early versions -- you could select remove (and thus variable) ads, or compiled-in ads (a much smaller list), and since I sometimes used it purely for local access, I went for the compiled-in ones because it took forever to start up while it was vainly trying to access remote ads.
    I think that they make their money off other products now.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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On 12 Oct 2008 20:00:46 GMT, "DoN. Nichols"
<snip>

<snip>
"Identify as Explorer" still has Opera in the ID. It will fool many sites though. "Mask as Explorer" removes all traces of Opera from the browser ID. You can only set the latter individually for each site. The first Identify choice can be set globally until you change it to something else.
Even if you set Opera to "Mask as Explorer" there are other ways a site can still figure out that you are using Opera if it tries hard enough. The only surefire way is to use a local proxy to change the string.
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DoN. Nichols wrote:

It's plain weird. I can only think that the guy got a piece of free software which makes web pages using Flash. Otherwise, it makes no sense.
Still, I shouldn't be too hard on the guy. We all have to start somewhere.
Best wishes,
Chris
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DoN. Nichols wrote:

His images also need a touch of sharpening after resizing.
Best wishes,
Chris
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DoN. Nichols wrote:

Dare I also suggest that many (possibly most) of the things for which JavaScript is used could better be achieved in other ways?
It's not in the same category as Flash, but it is used excessively and often makes browsing the web slower.
Best wishes,
Chris
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    [ ... ]

    I agree totally. That is why JavaScript is turned off by default on my browser -- and only turned on if *I* decide that what is there might be worth the risk.

    And one of the major offenders is eBay.
    But for a while a web comic ("The Mows" about cats) could *only* be viewed with Flash and JavaScript enabled. Thank goodness that they have stopped that. I couldn't find a way to e-mail the author (who was trying to push his Flash skills to potential purchasers -- and eliminating a certain percentage of his audience).
    And -- of course -- Flash keeps getting updated, requiring a newer plugin -- and the availability of the newer plugin for systems like Solaris on SPARC systems is well delayed after the introduction of the new Flash and the new plugins for Windows (and perhaps the Mac).
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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Larry Jaques wrote:

I never knew the space bar did that. I've always used "Page Down" and "Page Up".
I just figured out that backspace does the opposite, too. Cool!
Chris
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On Sun, 12 Oct 2008 17:15:30 +0000, the infamous Christopher Tidy

Hmm, it doesn't for me in Firefox. Backspace on a second or further page acts as a back button in the browser.
I love keyboard shortcuts and use every one I can find. I've been doing that since moving up to Micro$oft Windows 3.0 from DOS.
And since I use a Logitech Portable Trackman trackball, I don't have a wheel for paging up and down. I can use this thing in my lap, on an chair arm, etc. It's truly portable with the thumb-activated ball. http://tinyurl.com/3vewba or the IBM versions I found for $3 apiece the last time I needed a new one http://tinyurl.com/4xz96x . No more carpal problems or knotted levator!
-- "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it whether it exists or not, diagnosing it incorrectly, and applying the wrong remedy." -- Ernest Benn
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Larry Jaques wrote:

Well it does on Firefox 2.0.0.3 for Solaris SPARC, which is what I'm using.
Chris
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On Mon, 13 Oct 2008 16:00:36 +0000, the infamous Christopher Tidy

Windows XP Home/FF 2.0.0.17 here. Does anyone else on a different platform find different behavior? Please pipe up.
-- "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it whether it exists or not, diagnosing it incorrectly, and applying the wrong remedy." -- Ernest Benn
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    [ ... ]

    I get page-up from backspace in Opera 9.60 on SPARC running Solaris 10.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
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It is no big problem to remove the headstock and reinstall it, but the use of a test bar is best for alignment. Machining a test bar indicates error but not direction of error, where a proper predision test bar does. Most hobbyists will not own one, but after having done this job using both methods, the use of a test bar is much easier and more accurate. They can be found on ebay from time to time. I now have a set of them. Steve

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Steve Lusardi wrote:

A description of your test bars , please ? Precision ground between centers bar ?
--
Snag
I've learned a couple of ways to test accuracy , but always open for a new
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Terry Coombs wrote:

Really, a piece of hardened and ground shafting (like Thompson glide rails) works very well with the types of indicators the typical home shop would have. There is a tiny bit of sag due to weight, but it isn't real bad. The indicator with the lightest touch is best to avoid deflecting the shaft. (Oh, you have to verify the straightness of the shaft with indicator and surface plate, first. You can't assume any shaft is straight.)
Jon
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Setting up a lathe is not high tech. You must be careful, keep everything spotlessly clean and make multiple measurements with every step. Regrinding the bed of a lathe rarely produces increased accuracy, but what it does do is allow tight carraige adjustments which reduces chatter and adds overall machine stiffness. This increases consistancy making every step more repeatable. A worn out, loose lathe is capable of accuracy, but takes a lot of patience and experience to do that. When you service a lathe bed, every surface on the bed should be remachined to original specs. Any attempt to do otherwise is a waste of money. For those folks that have never done this, let me assure you that lathe beds look massive and enormously stiff, but they are not. They can and do bend and twist quite easily. That is why the bed leveling operation is so critical. Please do not misunderstand that statement, a level lathe is NOT important. They are quite successfully installed on ships. What is important, is bed straightness and reference to a water level is nothing more that a common base line reference. All lathe beds will twist with the weight of the carraige simply sliding across them. A lathe carraige is not balanced. It is much heavier on the apron side and when moved to the center between bed supports, will exert a twist as much as .004" worst case. Contrary to popular opinion, this will not cause an observable change to the dimensions of the cut because the position change of the tool rotates about the bed center. This is the reason a worn bed does not cause inaccuracy.
Head alignment does effect the lathe's accuracy. It is critical, so getting the spindle line parallel to the lathe bed is the second step in setting up a lathe. That is why a precision test bar is so important, because it easily shows these position errors. Every spindle comes with a precisionly ground inside cone. Typically it is a morse taper and the test bar seats there and provides a spindle extension on which a simple dial indicator is placed. The top of the bar has a ground flat which is positioned during testing, parallel to the bed. Observed deviation is vertical head misalignment. When the indicator is positioned 90 degrees away at the horizontal center any deviation along the bar's length indicates horizontal deviation. This deviation can be compensated with shims under the headstock.
These statements are verifyable with two tools, a precision machine level and a test bar and if you don't have access to them, get access or buy them. These are necessary to install a lathe, let alone repair one. Steve
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Steve, thanks. I saved your post. I think that my issue is not so much the worn surface of the bed itself, as it is very worn "inverted vee", which makes the carriage move sideways as it moves along the bed.
My plan, for now, is this:
1) Set the lathe correctly so that the bed is properly level. 2) Buy, borrow or steal a test bar 3) Measure everything and check with this group again 4) If numbers warrant, take the bed for re-grinding.

I have a Starrett 98 precision level, but not a test bar. I will look for one now.
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<snip>

Igor - I have a Starrett #199 level in good shape that you can borrow for a week or two. Email me at this address if you are interested.
Mike
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