Lathe vs milling machine

Gunner wrote:


No question - get a H/V if you can find one. If you can't find a H/V probably go for a V first since it's a bit more intuitive and I think tool changes are faster. Still look for a H and dividing head after for cutting gears and similar.
Pete C.
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wrote:

Cheater! <G>
Gunner The two highest achievements of the human mind are the twin concepts of "loyalty" and "duty." Whenever these twin concepts fall into disrepute -- get out of there fast! You may possibly save yourself, but it is too late to save that society. It is doomed. " Lazarus Long
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wrote:

You like to mix up the controversy, don't you!!! Talk about trouble makers!!!
Boris
------------------------------------- Boris Beizer Ph.D. Seminars and Consulting 1232 Glenbrook Road on Software Testing and Huntingdon Valley, PA 19006 Quality Assurance
TEL: 215-572-5580 FAX: 215-886-0144 Email bsquare "at" earthlink.net
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No, that's not the big question. The first big question is 'how many lathes' but once that's resolved then 'how many milling machines' comes up quite often....
Jim
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2 mills, 1 vertical, 1 horizontal, and 2 lathes, 1 nice, 1 for grinding & polishing. Still looking. jw
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snipped-for-privacy@segway.com wrote:

4 lathes: 9" Logan workhorse, 10" Enco project, 10" Atlas junker, 6" AA shelf queen
1 minimill. Gotta work on that mill thing.
Always looking
Rex
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2 lathes; 12" American Tool Works, 6" Atlas
2 mills; 1 Brigeport, 1 Sheldon horizontal
Basement full. Time for bigger house?
Gregm
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            Power tool list:
    6 lathes: In order of size
    12x24"    Clausing     6x18"    Atlas/Craftsman    (bench queen).     5"    Compact-5/CNC     4"?    Taig     3"?    Unimat SL-1000     2-1/2"    Watchmaker's lathe (still missing cross-slide.)

    5 mills (I think -- depending on how you count):
    Bridgeport    Vertical (undergoing conversion from old stepper CNC to             more modern servo CNC)     Nichols        Horizontal mill with vertical head.
    Emco C5        (milling column for the Compact-5 lathe mounted              to a more serious X-Y base.
    Unimat SL-1000    Same as the lathe above -- (it is a convertible).
    Hardinge    Ancient benchtop horizontal mill, with knee             leadscrew passing through bench top, and flat             belt to overhead mounted motor.
1 shaper
    Rockwell/Delta 7"
1 surface grinder
    Sanford 4x10"
2 Drill presses:
    Floor-standing 16-speed Taiwanese from about 1977 or so.
    Cameron Micro precision -- bench sensitive drill press with                  maximum bit shank of 1/8".

    Of course -- including looking for more space in my shop. :-)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
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wrote:

Lathe Dementia. Recognized as one of the major sub-strains of the all-consuming virus, Packratitis. Usual symptoms easily recognized and normally is contracted for life. Can be very contagious. michael
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If I could only have only one mill, it would be a vertical mill. Horizontals are very useful for some jobs, but a vertical is more general purpose. Of course some people would disagree.

Two lathes. One small one and one big one. Two mills. One vertical and one horizontal.
Lets add a shaper and surface grinder to the shop too. Maybe a shear, brake, couple grinders, drill sharpener for good measure too. Oh what the heck, lets add a foredom too.
chuck
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Chuck Sherwood wrote:

You forgot to add a good welder. A forklift, or at least an engine hoist is real handy for moving heavy goodies like 10" tilting rotary tables.
Pete C.
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I bought one of these at an auction for $10 and had the hydraulics done over for around $50.
http://www.wescomfg.com/hydstack.htm
It's great for lifting, moving and positioning heavy machine parts, jacking up and working on the garden tractor, raising the log splitter to a comfortable working height, welding either sitting or standing, bandsawing long heavy stock or structural steel, hanging weldments for painting, fixing the washing machine, and so on.
I made larger & wider stainless steel wheels with welding-rod needle bearings for it so it will roll around the yard easily. The stock ones are useless on dirt. It could use outriggers at the caster end for stability but it's OK with wooden blocks kicked underneath the uprights.
If the platform is at the top I can load it into the pickup truck by myself by tipping it back so the handle rests on the tailgate, then raising the wheel end and sliding it in. I put pins at the top of the rails to stop the platform from sliding off when it's horizontal.
jw
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snipped-for-privacy@segway.com wrote:

I got lucky and got a 3,000# Yale stand-up riding forklift with a nearly new battery for $300. I just had to track down a 24v charger for it and ended up getting a basic 10a charger for like $60.
Pete C.
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On 11 Aug 2005 15:20:35 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@segway.com wrote:

Mine wont pump up, and when I help it, it bleeds off quickly. Did you do it yourself or have it done?
Gunner
The two highest achievements of the human mind are the twin concepts of "loyalty" and "duty." Whenever these twin concepts fall into disrepute -- get out of there fast! You may possibly save yourself, but it is too late to save that society. It is doomed. " Lazarus Long
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Recutting the valve seats takes a special tool, something like a faucet seat cutter but conical. I generally disassemble and clean hydraulics and take them to one of several small local shops who are willing to fix the valves, order new seals and tell me any special reassembly tricks. I think they are too busy with commercial rush jobs to want to completely rebuild old stuff for hobbyists.
jw
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On Fri, 12 Aug 2005 07:26:48 GMT, Gunner

Hi Gunner,
My Dad fixed one by using a small worm-gear hand winch and by adding a wire pulley to the top where the chain pulley is.
It isn't the fastest in the world and it wouldn't hold up in everyday use, but it beats throwing ones back out :)
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
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On Sat, 13 Aug 2005 09:17:39 -0400, Leon Fisk

Interesting idea, but Id just as soon fix this one. Its out in the Stacks of Stuff and Ive not been able to do much with it in the little time Ive had.
Gunner
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On Sat, 13 Aug 2005 18:01:12 GMT, Gunner

Hi Gunner,
It is an easy fix and easily reversible. It will also free up the bad parts (you can remove them) so they can be fixed properly. You might even have a small worm-drive winch laying about ;-)
Just make sure you use a worm-drive or something that has a means to control and brake your lift/load.
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
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Only those that don't live in the "real world". I ran my (commercial) machine shop without a horizontal mill for 16 years and turned out a huge variety of work, including a considerable amount of tooling. I couldn't have done most of the work on a horizontal------nor on a non-drop-spindle vertical mill. I've always owned Bridgeports, but only because of economics. Had I been wealthy, I'd have filled my shop with Gorton mills.
Don't misunderstand. There are things you can do with a horizontal that are impossible on a vertical, but the vast majority of the work out there doesn't require one, and may not benefit from the use of one.
One place a horizontal leaves a drop spindle mill in the dust is in metal removal. For those that have never witnessed a serious horizontal mill running a large side or slab cutter, the metal removal rate is almost frightening. You'd swear there's no way in hell the machine could stand up to the task, but they do, and easily.
Harold
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