leather belt splice

I've got to replace the leather drive belt on my old South Bend lathe. I
want to use a skived glue joint for the splice, but am not sure what type of
glue to use. Any suggestions?
Reply to
William R. Hopcraft
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Speaking as a part-time leatherworker...
Waxed cotton thread. Seriously. A glued joint is likely to be too brittle to hold for long - I wouldn't be overly surprised if it exploded the first time the joint crosses a radius smaller than about twice the length of the lapped section.
Avoid synthetics, as they'll tend to be "slippy", particularly if they manage to stop on a small pulley. And as an added bonus, if that pulley happens to be the drive, you'll be re-stitching your splice in no time 'cause of the thread melting and letting go. Stick with waxed cotton.
Skive it down to a good long taper (at least 2-3 times the width of the belt long) on each end on both sides of the joint - one side skived on the "inside", the other on the "outside" surface - lay 'em up as a lap joint, and put in at least two, more if you've got the width for it, lines of stitching that run parallel to the edges, and at least the full length of the spliced zone plus a couple inches on either end. "Sink" each stitch (Try to pull it below the belt's surface, and/or stitch into a shallow groove you've pre-cut on the inside of the loop) and when you're done, if you've got the room to get the loop open far enough (or turn it "inside out"), open it up, inside facing you, lay it across your anvil (I presume you've got one... if not find/use a similar surface) on top of a *wrung almost dry* piece of cloth, and use a fairly light rawhide, wood, or plastic mallet to pound the bejeebers out of it. Not so hard you thin out or split the leather, but hard enough to "seat" the lap against itself.
*SLIGHTLY* loose stitiching is a good thing in this case, as it will give the lap a bit more flexibility to pass the pulleys without "thumping" - A super-tight stitch will produce a lap with less ability to conform to the shape of the pulley, so instead of travelling smoothly around, it will tend to either "stick" or "slip", depending on how rigid it ends up being. Both cases will give you a "thump" and/or erratic "grab-slip" misbehavior as the joint crosses a pulley.
Reply to
Don Bruder
The best stuff is a contact adhesive called Barge Cement.
This is the stuff shoemakers use to glue new soles on and it is seriously tough stuff.
I've tried some other brands of contact adhesives with less than stellar results. (not to say that some brand isn't as good, just that the ones I used weren't.)
In a pinch, I used some Gorilla Glue. It is a foaming polyurethane glue sold to woodworkers. I wiped a very, very thin layer on both sides of the skive and clamped the joint over night.
That was a couple years ago, and there is no sign of failing.
Paul K. Dickman
William R. Hopcraft wrote in message ...
Reply to
Paul K. Dickman
This is news to the belt manufacturers - how do you think they get belting in lengths bigger than one cow unit long? They glue the skived joints.
Leather belt cement used to be sold by McMaster Carr, and that's what I've always used on my SB machines. The barge cement is supposedly also available at shoemaker's stores and is reported to perform fine.
Jim
Reply to
jim rozen
William:
I was in the same situation, and finally opted to buy a new, reasonably-priced belt with a metal splice (textile composite belt, pin-and-loop splice) from Kyle McGowan. His website is at
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Email at the address given on the website for a quote.
Shipping time was a bit long, but the belt has done a fine job on my SB 14".
Best regards -- terry
Reply to
Terry McCreary
Jim has the same question as I -- if skived and glued is not good, why has it been used for so long? On the other hand, Don's stitching instructions were quite clear but seem to be bit of trouble if there is another way.
Bob Swinney
Reply to
Robert Swinney
On Sun, 29 Aug 2004 09:31:06 -0500, "Robert Swinney" calmly ranted:
Why use a chipped piece of flat rock when knives are available? Do you make you own soap, detergent, toothpaste, etc?
One problem with hide glue is temperature. It's intolerant.
Shoe Goo, E6000, etc. are all great sticky stuffs.
Reply to
Larry Jaques
What I have always wonderd is, if they make glue from horses how do they tell ahead of time which are the sticky ones?
Errol Groff
Reply to
Errol Groff
I kinda thought animal product to animal product---Hide Glue??--ya know, the stuff they make by boiling hides,hoofs,horns,etc...
"William R. H> I've got to replace the leather drive belt on my old South Bend lathe. I
Reply to
Jerry J. Wass
Thanks Errol....
Gunner, wiping potato chips and Mt. Dew off his monitor....
It's not unwise to remember that Mother Nature is essentially a murderous, sneakly, promiscuous bitch who has been trying to kill you since your conception.
Eventually she will succeed, perhaps with the help of your fellow man.
Life consists in putting off the inevitable as long as possible and taking what good and joy you can before her success.
Whether you attribute that situation to evolutionary forces, a fallen nature after Adam and Eve screwed the pooch, or whatever, it's no less true.
Be friendly, pleasant, unaggressive, and honest toward all and be prepared to ignore, avoid, or even kill anyone who is otherwise toward you. Being ready doesn't mean eager, just ready. What true friends are found in life will undestand and accept that fundamental rule of human interaction." John Husvar
Reply to
Gunner
instructions
The kids in South America seem to like "Resistol" by H.B. Fuller. Unfortunately, they liked it a little too much so the company had to stop manufacturing it.
Reply to
ATP
LOL---'cow unit long' Remember to specify metric (French, German, etc. cows), standard (American cows) or whitworth (British cows)
Reply to
NokNokMan
I think that it might depend on the pattern of cutting. I could picture a spiral which could be pretty long (though it might vary in toughness as it passes under the belly side) until you get to the milk production factory, at least.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
Those eating rubber plants naturally !
Martin
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
Naw! The real sticky one are those that *don't* throw their riders in the rodeo bucking bronc event. Those are the first to go. Bob Swinney
Reply to
Robert Swinney
Oooops! Strike *don't* below.
Bob Swinney
Reply to
Robert Swinney
Right, but then you have to configure the lathe so the belt still runs in a cow-shaped spiral during use!
Jim
Reply to
jim rozen
I wonder, do they have a special lathe to skin a cow in that fashion?
Reply to
Artemia Salina
I have some Barge Cement and am looking for a thinner that I can use in it. The stuff is old andI don't want to throw it out. Id rather thin it and keep on using it
Anyone know what to use ?
Reply to
Fuhh Kyu
Hide glue is rigid and won't last any time on a belt. Rabbit skin glue is flexible, so much more likely to last - especially with maybe 10% glycerine added.
But I'd use a modern glue, like Evo-Stik 528.
Reply to
Andy Dingley

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