flat belting

Hi All,
A friend of mine has a small lathe which has flat-belt pulleys, but no
belt. Is this stuff available anywhere?
If not, is there any option other than replacing the pulleys with V-belt
pattern?
Thanks for any suggestions,
Richard
Reply to
Richard Evans
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Still available, look in one of the vintage preservation magazines like 'Old Glory' and Stationary Engine magazine, or look on Google.
Don't forget that you need to sort out a joining device to hold the ends together, there are various methods available.
Peter -- Peter & Rita Forbes Email: snipped-for-privacy@easynet.co.uk Web:
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Reply to
Peter A Forbes
In message , Peter A Forbes writes
Thanks Peter, I'll pass that on. Richard
Reply to
Richard Evans
Richard Tony at lathes.co.uk used to advertise flat belting and the tools to join it, I believe he would hire the tool out. Worth checking out his website to see if he still does it. Martin
Reply to
Martin Whybrow
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em a call. Always helpful. Usual no connection just a satisfied repeat Customer stuff
Roland Craven Nr. Exeter, Devon, UK snipped-for-privacy@petternut.co.uk
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Reply to
Roland Craven
I used a guy a Walthamstow, forget the company name at the moment, who would skive the belts and lend you a hot press to join them. I'll search my records to try to come up with the company name if its any help or indeed, local to you. Bob
Reply to
Nospam
Is that the technical term for those long lapped joints (skive) ? I have a flat belt issue looming as well, and it has to be made in place. Are these hot presses small items you can use for insitu bonding ?
Steve
Reply to
Steve
Not to argue against skived or clipped joints, but I recently butted and harness stitched up a belt. See the instructions in the South Bend "How to run a Lathe", if you have it. If not, I could probably describe it. I used to make the leather sheathes for my knives, back in my knifemaking days, so harness stitch is not a big deal for me, definitely easier than a skive joint. YMMV
Adam Smith, Midland, ON Canada
Reply to
Adam Smith
I've just found 5-1/2 foot of 4.8mm diameter leather belting. Seems in reasonable nick considering the age it must be - suspect it might be ex-sewing machine. Anyone in need?
Steve
Reply to
Steve W
Yes, Skiving is the term for the long lapped joints. The belts supplied these days are often a "grass" green, about an 1" wide, but this can vary to suit requirements.
It's common that these belts need to be fixed round the mandrel etc without taking the machine apart.
What you do is measure round the top and bottom pulleys to get an overall length, this measurement is given to the belt company, who skive the ends so that when jointed, the belt is to your size.
The hot press is a hand held device that runs off 240 volts mains. All it does is speed up the gluing process. Cures the glue in minutes, so production can get back on track. Yes, it is used with the belt insitu.
You can just glue the ends of the belt together with the supplied adhesive, clamp it up square and tight, and leave for 24 hours to cure.
I'll search for the company name tonight.
Reply to
Nospam
In message , Nospam writes
Thanks Bob, I've passed all this on to my pal- not very local though- we're in Carlisle! Cheers Richard
Reply to
Richard Evans
The company was called Habasit. If you follow this link it should take you in the right direction.
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like they moved to Yorkshire? When I used them the company was in Walthamstow, London maybe it was just a local branch? Bob
Reply to
Nospam
Hi again If you study this site it should answer all your questions. I found a downloadable .PDF file that explains skiving belts. click on the link
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Reply to
Nospam
Thanks, thats good news. In this case the short belt enters and exits via different holes in the headstock casting - no amount of taking apart will avoid the need to make the belt in situ - so I am very pleased to hear the tool can be offered up to the lathe, though I am not sure I understand how the joint is made and stays flexible. It must be a rubber adhesive I suppose.
Steve
Reply to
Steve
Staples! with hinges?
Adrian
Reply to
Adrian Hodgson
The joint will be flexible enough to travel over the pulleys. The skived belt will have a marked line on each side of the belt at the end of the skiving. Simple apply the glue and offer the 2 halves of the belt together, up to the lines. If you don't have the hot press, a simple wooden jig (Formica faced, just in case you over glue) with a step in it will ensure the belt is aligned straight before clamping up for 24 hours. Tip. When you measure the length of belt required, by passing a tape measure around both pulleys, make sure nearly all the adjustment is off, thus giving you enough to take up any slack. Personally, I would knock a 1/4" off your measurement, just in case they make it a bit on the "generous" side Bob
Reply to
Nospam
No Adrian, thats just what I am trying to avoid. The previous owner said he had tried that and it was not a good idea on small diameter pulleys (this one is about 4" and only about a foot away from the motor). It was noisy and didn't give smooth drive. Thats why this skived belt joint attracted my attention. Thanks to this excellent thread the mystery now appears solved (and it seems I have been saved the cost of renting the hot press too).
Now I am looking forward to doing a little skiving !
Steve
Reply to
Steve

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