Magnesium tubing?

Source of fairly pure magnesium tube 1/4" to 3/8" diameter.
For arrow shafts....

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I don't believe pure magnesium is strong enough for that sort of duty. It's light, yes, but also brittle and fragile.
Any 'magnesium' you find in that kind of service is more likely an Mg/Al alloy, like the German Elektron Alloy used in old Karman Ghia and Porshe blocks.
Those are still _almost_ as low in density as pure Mg, but worlds stronger. FWIW, they still burn almost as well as pure magnesium, too. When I was in a volunteer FD, I saw a fatality accident where a guy was trapped in his Karman Ghia and the block caught fire. Went quick...
Lloyd
LLoyd
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On Fri, 21 Feb 2014 05:39:35 -0600, "Lloyd E. Sponenburgh"

Same stuff in Beetle and Hippie-van blocks. (and transmissions)
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On 2/21/2014 7:20 AM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Yeah, I've heard that too. But... Back when I was building VWs to fly I actually tried to light some of the shavings from the case. Couldn't get them started with an OA torch.
This application would prefer purer magnesium. They are intended to be "special" arrows. :)
But perhaps this approach isn't practical? A carbon fiber shaft might be a better starting point?
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On 21/02/14 17:07, Richard wrote:

IIRC only the earlier blocks contained significant magnesium the later ones were straight aluminium.

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On Fri, 21 Feb 2014 11:07:48 -0600, Richard wrote:

Without letting us know what's special about it, how can we say?
If you're looking for light/stiff/strong, carbon fiber will probably get you there a lot quicker than some fancy magnesium alloy, and be easier to find, to boot.
--

Tim Wescott
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The metal they use in arrows is actually pretty impressive stuff. It's notable how stiff they are and then once you cut or break one open how thin the walls actually are.
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On 2/21/2014 1:48 PM, Tim Wescott wrote:

Yeahbut... There are other properties besides mechanical. And light can have other meanings as well. Like the high temperature part?
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On 2/21/2014 3:22 PM, Richard wrote:

Well doggies! My favorite metal supply actually has something close. Roto Metals has 1/2" diameter rods @ $4 a foot. Now the silly problem is I have no way of machining magnesium solid rod. It would need a pocket at least 6 inches long (?) at the head end. FeO2 and Al should work, shouldn't it?
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rod.

You do know, Richard, that projectile incendiaries are illegal at the Federal level, unless licensed for specific purposes like Forestry Service back-fire starters, and the like?
You could be launching into a trajectory you really don't want to explore.
Lloyd
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wrote:

?? Magnesium machines easily.
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John B.
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On 2/21/2014 7:23 PM, John B. wrote:

I have a drill press and a belt sander. I don't think I'm ready to drill rods.
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wrote:

?? A good solid drill press vise; careful setup; long drill. You can do it :-)
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John B.
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Richard, being in a business that uses a lot of pure magnesium powder, I can tell you that solid Mg, despite its flammable nature, is hard to ignite 'on the fly' (as it were), and difficult to keep lit unless it's allowed to burn quietly in fairly still air. LARGE masses of it are difficult to extinguish because of the heat envelope and mass, but small masses of it are almost impossible to keep lit.
If you're having trouble locating magnesium in form you wish, I would suggest that it isn't even the _beginning_ of your endeavors.
Lloyd
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On 2/21/2014 3:44 PM, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

Thanks, Lloyd. Actually I'm kind of following part of the story line in the last book of the Hunger Games. Wondering if it's possible.
I knew solig Mg is hard to light, but didn't know that it had to be allowed to burn calmly (if that makes sense).
Which probably leaves the only other possibility as a Therm. mix?
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wrote:

A large surface to mass ratio is required. A thin magnesium ribbon will burn VERY well - and blowing on it does NOT put it out (from experience in the science lab years ago) Sodium is worse. So is white Phosphourous
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca fired this volley in

Clare, your high school experiences aside, I do this for a living. A large thermal mass contributes to keeping it lit under adverse conditions. True enough, a large volume of high surface area will cause vigorous-enough burning so that it's difficult to put out.
But a small surface like an Mg ribbon will only keep burning under strong air flow if it's inverted so that the heat climbs UP the ribbon. Stand it upright, and you can blow it out with a simple puff from your mouth. 'Done it many times for demos.
The same is true for "never put water on a magnesium fire". If the thermal mass is small, a tiny bit of water will cool it below the combustion temperature. With a large mass, or very high surface area, water then decomposes and promotes combustion.
Lloyd
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On Fri, 21 Feb 2014 17:48:55 -0600, "Lloyd E. Sponenburgh"

You are correct - but even a wooden match will self extinguish with the head up.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca fired this volley in

A plain wood splint will usually stay lit. Wooden match sticks are treated with ammonium phosphate to prevent their smouldering after being extinguished, and it serves as a mild flame suppressant, also.
LLoyd
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On Fri, 21 Feb 2014 17:48:55 -0600, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

My dad used to have a story about a fire at a Volkswagen repair shop, with a stockpile of engine blocks. He directed his guys to not put water on that part of the fire, and they got too excited to mind.
The fire got far more vigorous after some helpful soul put water on the pile of blocks. I don't know if they were already burning, or just hot enough to react with water when it was sprayed on them -- but they did burn the building to the ground.
--
Tim Wescott
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