Metalworking in Canadian bush

My buds and I drove 850 miles to Senneterre Quebec then the 120 miles of logging roads into the bush to go fishing at:
http://www.senneterre-outfitters.com/index.html We have used this outfitter for the past 5 years because the Pike fishing is good, they have hot showers and as we get older it's impossible to meet the weight limits on fly-ins. About 60 miles into the bush from Senneterre the coolant line going to the rear heater in the Ford van got the perfect hit from a rock kicked up from a tire, develops a gushing leak and overheats the engine.
While waiting for it to cool off we picked a few pints of wild Blueberries, they are EVERYWHERE. Mmmm! Within an hour a couple of Canadians headed back into town on a beer run stopped to help although they spoke only French. By then we had removed the engine cover and traced the coolant lines and planned a surgical bypass of the leaky system. I happened to have a hacksaw blade in my tacklebox in addition to a tool box with basic hand tools. So, there is my metalworking...cutting the steel coolant line. The rescuers of course had a cooler full of cold beer for the trip into town and we all toasted Canada and her wondrous fishing. It seems the language barrier only added to the enjoyment and laughs. A couple of hours later they brought us back a length of hose and some clamps that put us back on the road after filling the radiator from a nearby lake.
I don't feel guilty for not being better prepared, I can't carry enough spare parts and materials to foresee every possible situation. All I was really lacking was a hose clamp and I could have fashioned one from some lengths of 1/16" welding rod I have in my tacklebox and Vise-Grips. I think the best plan is basic stuff and plenty of beer...Canadian beer, of course.
We had no more adventures although the weather was hot and the fishing was fair at best with a few heafty Pike and enough Walleye for dinner and enough fillets to bring home so our families will let us go again next year. This was Canada trip year number 30 for us.
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On Fri, 03 Aug 2007 02:04:45 GMT, with neither quill nor qualm, "Tom

That sounds like a wonderful way to spend your time during a breakdown.

You guys really lucked out.

Take a spool of bailing wire next time. Wrap it twice around the hose and twist the ends with a pair of pliers to form a perfect hose clamp which will last for a decade or more.

Why don't you guys -fly- in next year? ;)
--
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or Turkish, appear to me no other than human inventions, set up
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Say, Larry. Where does one get a spool of bailing wire? Many, many years ago I worked the back end of a hay bailer or two that used wire. The wire came from a long cardboard tube and was straight as an arrow till you put it into the divider board slots and it was pressed back through the machine.
I haven't seen any new bailing wire in many years.
Best regards from Oregon Paul
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On Thu, 02 Aug 2007 20:34:06 -0700, with neither quill nor qualm, co snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com quickly quoth:

I was looking for some recently and found it at the Grange Co-Op. It was "only" SIXTY BUCKS. It was, of course, a 100# spool, and, of course, they would not sell me a portion of one.
Wally World and auto parts stores still stock it.
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On Thu, 02 Aug 2007 21:05:57 -0700, Larry Jaques
<snip>

<snip> ==========see http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber3367
I got it for my home made hot wire foam cutter for lost foam casting patterns. Is real handy for other jobs and wont rust. Unka' George [George McDuffee] ===========Merchants have no country. The mere spot they stand on does not constitute so strong an attachment as that from which they draw their gains.
Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), U.S. president. Letter, 17 March 1814.
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On Fri, 03 Aug 2007 11:30:13 -0500, with neither quill nor qualm, F.

Cool. I'll have to see if my local store stocks it. Stainless beats rusted black wire any day.
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wrote:

Gee, you want some SS wire? I might find some around here somewhere...
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Tom Gardner wrote:

Floor sweepings don't count! ;-)
--
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On Sat, 04 Aug 2007 16:06:51 GMT, with neither quill nor qualm, "Tom

Yeah, you might at that, huh, Tawm?
--
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co snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Baling wire! Bales of hay! Bailing is what you have to do if you build a leaky boat!
:-)
Look for black iron wire at the hardware store. I have even seen spools of it in the Borg Depot stores.
Usually pretty close to the concrete tools.
Cheers Trevor Jones
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wrote:

Safety wire is better for the application. Often stainless. Better than "mechanics wire" which is the black crap.
--
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clare wrote:

Agreed. But it's not readilly available everywhere.
I have accumulated a large selection of different safety wires, from ten to forty thou, and IIRC one spool of fifty one thou. Some Monel, some Inconel, and some just plain old stainless of unknown origin.
Black Iron wire is cheap, available, and easy to work with, and fits the "Baling Wire" desctription better than stainless lockwire does.
I have actually used baling wire, too! We had a fair collection of sections of prefabbed bale wires for a particular baler that had long since gone for razor blades, when I was a kid. The bundles were hanging on the shop wall, and were a ready source for times that a piece of such wire was needed.
I have to imagine that it was a long hot day, standing on the baler, feeding pairs of these wire sections into the machine to make bales.
Less work than loading loose hay, though, so it must have seemed an improvement.
Cheers Trevor Jones
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They bail in small bales still around here - big bales for those who can tote them on a trailer but when pickup is the transport - bales it is.
Martin
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net TSRA, Life; NRA LOH & Endowment Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot's Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member. http://lufkinced.com/
co snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

-
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Now, the smaller rolls are called "tie-wire"--used for tying re-bars in place before encasing in concrete---bldg supply stores should have it. Jerry
Martin H. Eastburn wrote:

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On Aug 2, 9:34 pm, co snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

That's because farmers don't bale hay with wire anymore, does nasty things to livestock innards. For hay baling they use twine of various sorts. You can get plain iron wire in various sizes at real hardware stores, the local True Value carries it as plain iron wire for repairs. You can also get thinner stainless stuff at a premium. A roll of the iron stuff has ridden in the tool box for as long as I've owned a car. They use similar stuff for rebar ties, which is where I got one roll of it, my dad picked it up off the floor on a job.
Stan
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On Sun, 05 Aug 2007 12:17:39 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@prolynx.com wrote:

I use a lot of 19 gage, black soft iron wire, AKA tie wire, AKA stove pipe wire. Perfect for hose clamps and general tying together of loose items of like genre. I also keep a stock of 16 ga. and 9ga. galvanized, along with misc. SS and Al. stock. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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On Sun, 05 Aug 2007 17:13:33 -0400, Gerald Miller

What the heck do you use that 9ga for; a poker?
--Andy Asberry-- ------Texas-----
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wrote:

Pretty much. Got it at a good price when it was left over on a fence job. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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On Tue, 07 Aug 2007 21:21:52 -0400, Gerald Miller

Sounds like brace wire, or guy wire.MISERABLE stuff to work with (when fencing)
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The space under the seats has heater hose, the old fan belt that was replaced before it broke, a few feet of heavy wire, a couple of adjustable wrenches and a socket set. Le Manual de Useless de Chilton lurks somewhere under or behind the seat. Warning triangles behind the seat, along with extra oil, PS fluid, etc. The glove compartment has pliers, screwdrivers, a spool of small wire, fuses, lightbulbs, flashlight, and gloves.
On the 1976 Ford truck with a 6, a bit of time spent forming strap or heavy wire into racks could have resulted in a bunch of that stuff stored under the hood - a straight six in a space build for a big-block V8 left a lot of room for quarts of oil, gallons of antifreeze, etc... On the 95, the crap attached to the poor little straight six fills almost all the space under the hood - I pity folks with a big-block V8 in this era, as it must be shoehorned in like a box full of cobras.
--
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