OA Cart

I want to build an OA cart for a big O2 and acetylene bottle. The O2 is the
big one, and the acet is about half as high, but not the big fat one, but
about the diameter of the O2.
I have seen lots of carts. I want one that has large diameter wheels, and
the cylinders are at a slight tilt when parked. Where it takes minimal
leverage to tip and move. Anywhere I can get some dimensions or ideas about
this?
Maybe I'll shop around and just see how much it is to buy one, as it may be
cheaper and easier.
Steve
Reply to
SteveB
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Antique fire-extinguisher carts? They seem to have a front-rear 2 bottle arrangement that might have some utility.
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Dave
Reply to
XR650L_Dave
Take a look at he Horrible Fright cart. Not the greatest, but for $60.......
Bob
Reply to
Bob
Find some wheels, then copy the rest from a catalog photo.
jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
I had a great cart that I since sold for space reasons. Could give you some ideas.
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You could start with a regular hand truck and weld on some cylinder supports to it. It seems to be the easiest approach.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus21207
I have special parameters. I live on a sand dune. Lots of my pulling around is on blowsand, and I need wide wheels. I said big diameter wheels without thinking. May just have to put four inflatable wide cart wheels on it, kicked back a bit so that the tipping point is easier. It's getting harder to muscle stuff from this broken back. May even consider one of those four wheel tongued carts that you pull with an ATV, or a little HF two wheel trailer where they are mounted on there permanently and solidly. Hose racks, a tray for tips and striker, etc.
If I could find just the right thing, I'd just buy it. But I like to putter and create, but then sometimes you end up not getting what you want and spending more than a new one costs and you end up with a worthless white elephant. Those 142# O2 cylinders are getting heavier. Anyone notice that?
Steve
Reply to
SteveB
Yeah, I've got one of those. It'll be with me forever, and when I die somebody can use it for a jack stand for a locomotive. However, I do like the method I used to secure the bottles, chain and De-Sta-Co clamps. It's quick and secure. See the following:
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Pete Keillor
Reply to
Pete Keillor
On Mon, 13 Jul 2009 07:43:28 -0400, the infamous Pete Keillor scrawled the following:
Yeah, they are, aren't they?
Sweet cart, Pete. All I see missing are the rubber bands to hold the ends of the chains from making Poe noises. I used rubber coated chain on my TIG bottle. It doesn't rattle, and that's nice. (Now to get enough room in the shop to actually be able to _use_ it...
-- Mistrust the man who finds everything good, the man who finds everything evil, and still more the man who is indifferent to everything. -- Johann K. Lavater
Reply to
Larry Jaques
Get a couple of those no-flat wheelbarrow tires, the ones you can pound nails through. Then make sure that the tires aren't loaded when it's parked, otherwise you will get flat spots.
Reply to
Leon Fisk
That was the nice thing about my particular cart model, when the thing is sitting, the tires are clear of the floor. Not by much, but enough. Large diameter tires are nice when dragging the works over rough ground, I've had ones with 8" tires, bad news on rough and potholed concrete. The green slime helps with tubes that want to go flat, too. Still looking for a set of solid urethane tires, though. It's not like I'm going to drag the thing along at 40 mph, after all.
Stan
Reply to
stans4
I have just a standard cart, maybe 8 inch hard rubber wheels, but not hard enough to keep from developing flat spots. I shove a small block of wood underneath the wheel side when it is going to be parked for awhile, to get the weight off them. Just one of those little design details, it would have been trivial to have built the cart to do this.
Reply to
Leon Fisk
Maybe something like this?
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jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins

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