Old welding machine value

I found an older welding machine today in my current ad for a welding
machine.
It is a Lincoln Model DC 225-3-AS powered by an Onan CCK motor. This looks
like the same Onan I had on a Lincoln Weldanpower 225 and it ran just fine.
It has two 115v. take off plugs, no AC welding capability, and no CCV tap.
No 220 plug.
This old machine started on the third pull with a cord, and that was cold as
could be. Some black smoke and the smell of bad gas, but no white smoke,
and none after it warmed up. No smell of oil in exhaust, as from bad rings.
I waited for it to warm up, and then welded some 7018 AC using the DC at 150
and the fine tune at 10. It ran good. The 7018 was all I had, buying it
for a Tombstone I have, too.
Anyhoo, the guy wanted a grand. I suspect this machine is from the early
80's. It doesn't look like it's been used a lot, but could use a can of
Gunk spray and a power washing.
I told him a grand was high on that age of machine, and that I would get
back to him after I researched it. He was an old hippie intellectual type
who used the machine to make some fencing and a truck rack. I didn't go
look at the fencing and truck rack after looking at the welds he made on the
trailer.
What would you offer for it? Or would you make him give ME something to
haul it off? ;-)
I'm thinking $300.
Steve
Reply to
SteveB
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$300.00 sounds about right.
Best Regards Tom.
Reply to
azotic
400-600 in this neck of the woods.
$500 would be fair in most places, if it has good long leads and so forth.
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Lincoln manual....
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Same machine? Date on the manual is 1988
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Gunner
Reply to
Gunner
$500-ish sounds reasonable to me if it is complete and in good shape, the compression checks out OK, etc.
If he tries throwing "E-bay Pricing" at you, remind him that those reported sale prices are often pumped up by bidders who don't know what stuff is worth - I've seen stuff that is available new for less than what the auction closed for if you know where to shop, with a warranty and everything. And then you take ~12% off the top of that reported price for seller's fees and listing fees.
Read the schematics, you might be able to make a simple rewire to get 220V out of it if needed. They do make split-service straight blade duplex receptacles with the top half NEMA 5-20R 20A 120V and the bottom half NEMA 6-20R 20A 240V.
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Reply to
Bruce L. Bergman
Receptacles are two 115v. When anyone tries to throw me a curve with a higher price, I just say, "If you can get that for the widget, then you'd be a fool to sell it to me for less." Sometimes they take the offer, and sometimes they don't. This guy won't get a grand for this machine unless he finds a totally clueless individual, which has been known to happen.
Steve
Reply to
SteveB
It is quite possible that those 115 volt plugs are DC voltage! and thaey will not operate most new power tools. Like anything with a soft start or speed control.
Reply to
NewsGroups
Well, the one instruction book I found says the auxiliary power output from the Lincoln DC-225/3-AS is in fact AC. The only thing I was questioning is if it had a 240V center-tapped AC winding going to two 120V receptacles (ignoring the fact that it can make 240V with a bit of rewiring), or a single 120V winding that can't be modified.
But even though you have to remember if the generator is DC output, that's not as big a problem as it seems - the vast majority of small hand power tools out there are still using single-speed brush type universal motors that aren't at all fazed by running on DC.
And if cabinet work is on the calendar and your favorite router is variable speed and AC Only, you have to remember to bring along the "Old Faithful" one-speed with the brush universal motor.
My almost-new Skil Mag-77 is rated "120V DC or AC to 60 Hz." Which would work fine if there are any pockets still using 25 Hz or 50 Hz gear somewhere in the far backwoods. Just can't use it on an aircraft with a 400 Hz AC power system without rectifying to DC first.
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Reply to
Bruce L. Bergman
Did you get the "Code Number" (production variation) for the unit? I don't want to start slogging through all of the schematics they show on the Lincoln site to look at the AC windings...
The one parts list I did pull up shows separate armatures for "115V Only" and "230V Only" units, no mention of a 115V/230V center-tapped.
I find people trying to sell me something off-the-cuff will just say "Make me an offer" - and I refuse to just throw out a number blind, or accept one they offer without a bit of research. They are insulted if I toss out a total low-ball, and I can get screwed too easy if I overbid and they hold to the offer, even after I research it.
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Reply to
Bruce L. Bergman
When I hear "make me an offer" I always reply..."Its your item, you must have some idea of what you want for it. Tell me and we can go from there"
Nearly always works..and often the price goes down .
Gunner
"Pax Americana is a philosophy. Hardly an empire. Making sure other people play nice and dont kill each other (and us) off in job lots is hardly empire building, particularly when you give them self determination under "play nice" rules.
Think of it as having your older brother knock the shit out of you for torturing the cat." Gunner
Reply to
Gunner Asch
Whatever the price becomes, it will be a boat anchor if you cannot get parts (or cobble something together) if it malfunctions.
Reply to
Tom Kendrick
"Bruce L. Bergman" wrote
Code # 7444
Reply to
SteveB

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