OT Bought a 2001 Ford Ranger


I bought a 2001 Ford Ranger 4X4 truck last weekend, 106K miles, 4.0L 6 Cyl.
I'm wanting to find out what items I can expect to need to replace within
the next 50k to 100K miles. Such as sensors, ball joints, U-joints, tie rod
ends, etc. If I understand correctly, the engine should easily last over
200K miles, maybe 300k. Just wanting to know what to expect, I'm hoping to
do preventative maintenance instead of waiting for a failure.
RogerN
Reply to
RogerN
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--Water pump will fail after about 100k; tranny will go at about 125k. My last 4 trucks have been Rangers; all with the V-6 engine. F-150 actually gets comparable mileage but they're harder to park... ;-)
Reply to
steamer
I had a 1991 2.9 V6. It made 236,500 miles when a ring cracked.
Alignments were a bitch since bushings had to be changed.
I had to have the front coils replaced and the rear springs re-arched. I didn't carry heavy loads.
Two water pumps. Might have been only one if I had checked the viscous fan drive for play. The fan drive ate the pump and the replacement pump.
Had to replace the drive shaft u joints early in life like still in warranty, paid for an upgraded driveshaft instead of getting the same OEM crap that died in warranty. Felt ripped on that one.
Automatic locking hubs were replaced by manual hubs early in life but after warranty.
The front axle joints were replaced once on both sides.
Tranny was solid. Changed fluid at 50K and again at 100K.
Good luck, it wasn't a bad truck considering it was a 4x4 with the extra wear items.
Wes -- "Additionally as a security officer, I carry a gun to protect government officials but my life isn't worth protecting at home in their eyes." Dick Anthony Heller
Reply to
Wes
I just got the chance to check the gas mileage today, I got 202 miles on 9.856 gallons, a little better than 20 mpg, not to bad on a 4.0L V-6. Anyway, if this thing lasts me a few years that will be great.
RogerN
Reply to
RogerN
Geeze Roger, my Vette does considerably better than that and it's got a 5.7 liter V-8. I get 31 MPG on the freeway doing 80 miles an hour. Things aren't so good around town - about 19 MPG and if I put my foot in the thing far enough it goes from miles per gallon to gallons per mile. LOL
Reply to
John R. Carroll
I had an 85 2.8L 2wd, my wife had a 94 4L 4wd Mazda that I ended up driving, and I currently drive a 96 2.3L 2wd.
I am squarely in the rust belt, which slants my repairs to a certain perspective.
All 3 have had at least one, if not all, of the rear spring hangers (frame brackets) and/or shackles replaced. If you need to do this, an air hammer with a pointed tool works great for pounding the bolts out of the spring bushings. Sometimes you can get them out of the sleeve, sometimes the sleeve and bolt will drive out of the rubber bushing, sometimes you will have to eat away at the bushing itself with drills and sawblades (if there is enough gap where the spring wraps sometimes you can get a sawzall blade in there). Just buy the pair of bushing halves, sleeve and bolt when you get the bracket, since only the dealer will have them anyway (well, or eBay). Grind the bracket rivets off flush with a cut-off wheel, pound them through the frame with the air hammer, and fit the new brackets up with bolts. Some people will tell you to remove the bed to get at the brackets, but I found it far easier to just work from below. At some point you will probably end up jacking the spring away from the frame to give you some elbow room, and a ratchetting strap to move the axle backwards or forwards to get the eyes to line up can help.
The one time I had to pull a bed to get at a leaking gas tank gasket was a royal pain, requiring cutting all the bed bolts--one of which is over the tank. I seem to recall that the tank was a tight enough fit that cutting the straps and dropping it wouldn't have worked without pulling the driveshaft or somesuch.
On 2 of the 3, one or more helper or overload leaves has broken, requiring replacement. On the 96, I left the main leafs in, cut the eyes off another pair of spring packs, rounded the ends slightly, then used that new spring pack main leaf as an additional helper leaf. They've now taken a set and are about down to stock height again after a number of years of consistent abuse--as much due to potholes as loading.
On every single one, the two bolt flange (spring loaded or not) at the center of the exhaust system has given trouble. Every time I have given up and simply hacked the flanges off (metal blade in a sawzall will do it in seconds) and replaced them with a simple repair tube (to convert the diameters) and a pair of u-clamps all that trouble has ceased. Muffler shops hate it, because they can no longer sell you a whole system to replace just the bad gasket seats on a pair of flanges--one of which end s up staying on the cat half anyway. Though on the 84, whenever the gasket went, it gained a few horsepower along with that "sportier exhaust note" which made it more fun in heavy expressway traffic (if you have to be there, more fun is good).
U-joints at somewhere between 100k and 200k is a good guess, I just did the ones in the 96 at 200k. So is an alternator and whatever belt idlers you have. The 4.0 had AC which, oddly enough, never gave a bit of trouble.
The Mazdas are not rustproofed the same as the Fords, and will rust out faster, especially at the wheelwells. Even outside the rustbelt. I visited a friend in DFW and he pointed out that even there all the Mazdas of a certain age were rusted out.
The 4x4 ate a set of automatic hubs at some point, which then caused the electric transfer case shift motor to be overused and burn out, and I think the relay. I think that was at about 125k, give or take. I loved having the low range for pulling overgrown shrubs, but other than that, didn't use 4-wheel more than once or twice a winter. I kept it as a yard mule for a couple years after I took it off the road just for that (had to rent a backhoe the next year). The 96 is geared for mileage, it could use a lower gear to save the clutch when towing, particularly when backing loaded trailers.
I've not had a lick of trouble with the Mazda 5-speed in any of them.
Far and away the best resource I have found for information is
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which is admittedly geared towards the off-road enthusiast, but all their basic info has been spot-on, is extensive, and is augmented with additional forums for the essoteric stuff that crops up. Start at their tech library:
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Hope that helps. --Glenn Lyford
Reply to
Glenn Lyford
I haven't found a fuel efficient truck made in recent years, the mileage I heard others report was around 15-18mpg, I'm glad I'm getting a little better than that. I plan to use my 96 Honda Civic most of the time and drive the truck when I need to haul something, car needs repairs, snow & ice, etc. Before this Ranger I used my 1 ton 7.3L diesel 4X4 that isn't very cost effective to drive but is great for a heavy load or heavy trailer.
RogerN
Reply to
RogerN
Very good truck
Head gaskets may..may need replacement around 135-175k. I understand Ford solved that problem..but Im keeping my fingers crossed as my 2001 has 180k on it so far.
Belt Idler pully and bearing at about 125k
Ive never..never replaced a front end part in a Ranger/Mazda 2wd. Neither in my 94 Mazda B3000 (3.0) or my current 2001 Ranger (3.0)
Alternator at 200k
I cant speak for the 4x stuff.
Ive also never replaced a drive line part either. No..take that back..replaced one carrier bearing at 350k on the 94 Mazda
Is it auto or clutch?
Autos need to be flushed at 150k Standards will need both the slave cylinder replaced with the clutch plate (about 175k miles for me), and so forth.
Gunner
Gunner
Reply to
Gunner Asch
Thanks, I was just wondering if a camper shell would make a difference, also my mileage was with the A/C running, might do a little better without it.
RogerN
Reply to
RogerN
It does seem odd that GM can get almost as good of gas mileage out of a Vette with a V-8 as they can with an Aveo with a 4-cylinder though. Does your Vette have the feature where it can run on 4 cylinders?
RogerN
Reply to
RogerN
Thanks for the info Gunner, I knew you had a lot of mileage experience with the Ranger and that's the major reason I was interested in a Ranger. I am satisfied with the 20+ mpg I'm getting considering it's the 4X4 Ranger with 4.0 V6, running with A/C, and a few miles of the drive is in town.
RogerN
Reply to
RogerN
Thats very good mileage. With the current one, service shell and about 800 lbs of Stuff crammed into it..I average 19 mpg with the 3.0
The Mazda, (same engine) with its stick shift, averaged 21mpg but it had the plastic shell.
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Early picture before adding the service shell
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And of course the van...which actually gets about 15mpg..if I dont drive over 55. At 65..it goes down to 10 mpg....
I LOVE the Ranger. As do most of the service companies in So. Cal. Phone companies etc etc.
Id love to have the 4.0 engine..but they are much less common out here in the extended cab, oddly enough.
Gunner
Reply to
Gunner Asch
Guy at work claimed his trans am got 29 mpg. Probably did on the highway. I can beat you on highway mileage but I'd give that up for a nicer ride like yours. How is it in snow storms? My Saturn works better than I expected.
Wes -- "Additionally as a security officer, I carry a gun to protect government officials but my life isn't worth protecting at home in their eyes." Dick Anthony Heller
Reply to
Wes
Some cars have the equipment to give a gas mileage at the moment using fuel flow rate and speed. I'm wondering if that is where John gets 31mpg with his Vette or if that includes pulling into filling stations and accelerating up to speed. My truck doesn't have that feature so my gas mileage includes starting, stopping, idling, accelerating, a few miles through town plus some highway miles. I'm guessing the mileage while cruising on the highway is a good bit better than my 202 mile average of 20.4 mpg.
RogerN
Reply to
RogerN
Data points for Rav4 (considerably more drag than a Vette), >2 tons loaded, with 3.5L 268hp V6.
75mph highway cruise on level road, a little over 30
75mph highway cruise with normally imperceptible decent (that's obvious with GPS), into the mid 30s
230 mile return trip mostly highway with LV traffic in the middle, average 29 until...
Climbing 1500' in 6 miles on dirt road - as little as 7
Normal mix of 2 lane pavement, high speed dirt road, and above mentioned hill climbing, 23
I use a Scan Gage to monitor instantaneous, average per trip, and average per tank. It's calibrated to actual mileage and verified at each fill up.
So I could say that I get 30 or 23. Either is both valid and misleading at the same time.
Wayne
Reply to
wmbjkREMOVE
You can display either the instant or average. I drove 350 miles on the freeway today and reset the average going down the ramp. 328 miles later I'd averaged 32 MPG and I had the cruise control set at 85 MPH the entire way. There were instantaneous readings as high as the mid 50's and lows down to 19.
It's all about computerization Roger.
Reply to
John R. Carroll
It's OK. I get where I need to go and I was driving Corvettes in the 70's and 80's through Michigan winters. My '66 got me around in the Ann Arbor area while I was going to college. Took a while for it to warm up inside during February though.
Reply to
John R. Carroll

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