OT: scary



Actually, nasty as they are, they are not immortal - you just need to understand that a microwave is a big cavity with the microwave energy running around, HOWEVER, by definition, the voltage at the metal wall of the microwave is always 0. This is why when stuff splatters in the microwave, it doesn't "bake" onto the walls. Now if you put the little bastards on a paper plate elevated from the bottom of the microwave (this is why there is space under the tray at the bottom), I suspect they would go off like popcorn ... yuck !!
mikey
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B.B. wrote:

They probably were avoiding the hot spots in the oven. To see where the hotspots are for yourself, perform this experiment: Wet the glass platter with a sponge, lay a sheet of paper across it and use the sponge to squeegee out the air bubbles and get the paper uniformly wet. If there is a carousel thingee that rotates the platter, remove it for this test. Now run the oven for 30-45 seconds. The dry areas on the paper will show where the hot spots are located.
Fred
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And you can then measure the wavelength of the standing wave in the microwave, check the frequency of the microwave from the plate on the back and use that information to determine the speed of light.
ff wrote:

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B.B. wrote:

The low-tech approach is to buy an appropriate lizard and let the lizard run loose. I have lived in many old apartment houses which suffer from las cucharachas. Even if you wiped them out 100% in your unit it's likely someone else has a big problem. The idea is then to minimize them in your unit and to disincentivize them from being there. They move freely from apartment to apartment. Clean meticulously, and put out some Roach Motels. They work fine. Put one in your refrigerator, and if they like your microwave, put one in there too. Read up on control on the Web, and learn to live with them. Most people on the planet do, after all.
GWE
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On Sun, 03 Jul 2005 12:41:56 -0500, "B.B."

I tried the same experiment with little brown ants in my microwave with the same result. My theory was that the ants were too small to be decent antennas (I guess that's a pun, huh?) for energy at around 2.3 GHz.
Seems the roaches should be big enough, but maybe not the parts containing water. I sprayed a little water on the dish where the ants were in the microwave and stewed them.
Later I changed my "ant war" technique to using a fast moving propane torch on low flame. Worked well as long as I moved fast enough not to scorch any parts of my house. I don't think it would be useful for roaches, though.
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I last killed ants in the home with a 300 watt photographic bulb in a plain aluminum clamp on fixture. They cook really fast with the light aimed near them. Strobes didn't seem as effective, even when focused on them.
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I'm cleaning a beverage off of my monitor!
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wrote:

Ah, the joys of milk coming out of your nose !!
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As I recall the right powder will kill cockroaches. Not even a poisonous powder. Just one that gets on their body and when it falls off it takes a bit of the wax on the outside of the cockroaches body. The first stuff I read about was for thickening ink as I recall. So do a little searching on the internet and see what is currently recommended.
Oh yes the way it works is they lose some of the wax on their bodies. With the wax missing, water vapor can escape and the cockroaches dehydrate and die.
Dan
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wrote:

Boric Acid..trade names such as Roach Pruf etc. Works well.
Gunner
"Considering the events of recent years, the world has a long way to go to regain its credibility and reputation with the US." unknown
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boric acid is effective - spread powder around edges of floor, etc - it gets on their exoskeleton and they dessicate. and it's non toxic and environmentally friendly and very cheap

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Yup. Get a plastic squeeze bottle with a long nozzle and a small hole in the tip. Fill it ~25% with powdered boric acid. Shake it to get a nice dust cloud and then poke the nozzle into cracks and crevices (particularly under counters in your kitchen) and blow the dust in. You want a nice even layer of dust to coat all the crawling spaces. As William wrote, boric acid is non-toxic, so you don't have to worry about it around your food stuffs. In fact, some pest control experts suggest dusting your carpets with boric acid powder to control fleas and roaches.
Incidentally, boric acid is also a great chemical to use to control termites. Mix up a solution with water and spray wood or foam it into walls. Termites won't eat wood that's been treated. Boric acid also stops fungal wood rot.
Basically, it's a great all-around pesticide/fungicide that's effective, non-toxic, and cheap (it's simply mined out of the ground). Too bad lumber companies don't pressure treat all construction lumber with boric acid.
- Michael
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Where can one get boric acid?
--
B.B. --I am not a goat! thegoat4 at airmail dot net
http://web2.airmail.net/thegoat4 /
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Based on my earlier research (to combat a termite problem), Boric acid is commonly sold in the form of two compounds (there may be others): Orthopedic Acid ("Borid" is one brand of this compound) and Disodium Octoborate Tetrahydrate which is a water soluble inorganic borate salt ("Timbor" is one brand of this compound). As far as I know, these two boric acid compounds are similar in pesticidal/fungicidal effectiveness and other properties.
I bought my supply of Timbor online at ePestSupply.com:
http://www.epestsupply.com /
Search their site for Timbor, Borid, or simply "boric acid". Lots of options available.
You can read the product information at:
http://epestsupply.com/images/Products/labels/timbor.pdf http://epestsupply.com/images/Products/labels/boridlabel.pdf
They also have the MSDS and other info for these and many other chemicals at:
http://epestsupply.com/images/Products/labels /
Btw, this company is a great source of pesticidal chemicals and supplies that are normally only available to licensed professionals. Standard disclaimer: I have no interest in this company; just a happy customer.
- Michael
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    Greetings and Salutations.
On Sun, 03 Jul 2005 17:24:11 -0500, "B.B."

    Well, the BEST Place I have found is in the laundry section of your local food supermarket. Look for boxes of 20 Mule Team Borax. NOTE: you do not want "BORAXO"...that includes detergent.     It is not only a great insecticide, but, will clean and freshen your laundry.     I deal with ant problems by mixing a little honey into some borax, just enough to make a thick paste, and putting dollops of it in areas where the ants appear. They love it, and, hoover it down...then, take it back to the nest, where they feed it to the OTHER ants. It is not quick (It can take a week or so), but, it is VERY effective.     Regards     Dave Mundt
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If you can't find the plain stuff, you can make it by adding acid (muriatic is a good choice) to borax. (Borax alone also works.) Boric acid is insoluble and precipitates, filter and rinse and there 'ya go.
FYI, boric acid and borax are both "poisonous" to the tune of 200mg/kg, meaning a leathal dose of around 16 grams (salt's LD50 is 4000mg/kg), which is also around the LD50 of acetylsalicylic acid (asprin).
Tim
-- "California is the breakfast state: fruits, nuts and flakes." Website: http://webpages.charter.net/dawill/tmoranwms
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I have read that equal parts of oat meal and plaster of paris mixed together will do them in. (leave out the water) The idea is they eat this mixture and it sets up in their stomach. They can't eat or drink and die.

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Yes, they are mortal - IF you use 1 Raid Fumigator per room.
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RAM^3 wrote:

I lost the orig. post but have this to add; I was in an oriental 99 cents store and picked up some chalk like sticks that when rubbed around baseboards, drawers, cabinets, etc., killed ALL roaches. This is in an immigrant apartment building, the chalk was applied 5 years ago, and 1 year after. NO reinfestation since. Safe for pets, humans, etc. Promably boric acic in a binder. I'm not being racist, - I live here! The exterminator told me the other residents apparently have never seen a broom or trash can. I turn the exterminator away now. My small spiders clean it up and go away until more food appears.
wws
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On Sun, 3 Jul 2005 19:46:49 -0500, the opaque "RAM^3"

Fresh out of high school in '71, I moved to Phoenix for tech school. The roaches in my Adams Avenue home were 3" deep on any plate left on the floor. After talking with local restaurant owners, I got a gallon of Indianhead roach killer which was safe(r) to spray in kitchens and around the baseboards inside. 2 applications did the trick over the course of a month. Company may have gone OOB in 1991. <http://www.pesticideinfo.org/Detail_Product.jsp?REG_NR 277700016&DIST_NR2777#Company>
--- Annoy a politician: Be trustworthy, faithful, and honest! --- http://www.diversify.com Comprehensive Website Development
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