OT: Solution to fogged glasses (from mask)

Has anyone solved the fogged glasses problem? It's making me nuts. I wear progressives, and can't just push them higher up on my face. Scouring the internet (poking around for a half hour or so) hasn't revealed any solutions.
Fer crissake, this is the 21st century! Surely there must be a way to deal with this.
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rangerssuck wrote:

I use Cat Crap or Sea Drops on mine. It helps but nothing is perfect. I have also found that pushing the glasses tighter makes it worse, Instead I get the mask formed tight to my nose and set the glasses on it. That works very well, but you need to be careful when you remove the mask.
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Steve W.

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On Wed, 28 Oct 2020 21:27:24 -0400

I'm doing similar. Using a homemade cloth mask, I carefully work it in between my glasses and face. Maybe let my glasses ride slightly low. I can't see all that well anymore so I'm used to some of the hassle...
I've been reading here & there that a metal band/wire of some sort along the top, well formed over your nose bridge helps a lot..
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wrote:

Yes. I have a cloth mask made by a friend of my wife. I added a nose bridge wire made of five or six inches of tinned solid #18 copper busbar wire. The ends should be rounded to prevent snagging.
One installs the wire by opening a hole in the cloth using a needle to displace the threads, slide the wire in, and then smooth the hole out.
This nose bridge is easily formed by hand, and does not creep out of shape very much.
Joe Gwinn
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    [ ... ]

    A semi-cousin makes masks, and usually uses pipe cleaners as stiffening materials. I made up a number of strips of aluminum, 0.025" thick approximately, 1/4" wide and 8" long. She stitches them into the mask as it is made. I find this to do a very nice job of stiffening the top mask edge in a formable manner.
    I bought the aluminium in 12x24" size, sheared it into 12x8" sheets, and then with a smaller (and sharper) shear cut it into 1/4" wide strips of 8" length. (The smaller shear could not handle the 12" width, so the big, duller shear was used for those cuts. You can really cut aluminum that thick with heavy duty scissors, if you don't have the shear.
    I took a stack of them and used a cheap 1" belt sander to round the ends, so they would not cut their way out of the fabric. I have two made that way, two with the square ended strips (for test comparison) and one with the pipe cleaner, which my wife is currently using.

    Same with the 1/4" wide by 0.025" thick aluminum.

BTW    I remember a WW-II gas mask which came with a block of wax. You     rub it on the inside of the lenses, and then polish with cloth.     This does a pretty good job of keeping them from fogging. With     glasses, you might want to treat the outside with the same     process, as there may be humid breath hitting the outer surface     as well as the internal surface.
    Good Luck,         DoN.
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"rangerssuck" wrote in message
Has anyone solved the fogged glasses problem? It's making me nuts. I wear progressives, and can't just push them higher up on my face. Scouring the internet (poking around for a half hour or so) hasn't revealed any solutions.
Fer crissake, this is the 21st century! Surely there must be a way to deal with this.
=================================Soap.
https://health.clevelandclinic.org/how-to-keep-your-glasses-fog-free-while-wearing-a-mask/
Soap may leave a noticeable film when it dries, but it does help.
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On Thu, 29 Oct 2020 06:55:03 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"

First off, fogged lenses indicate that you don't have a good nose seal from the mask. Have you formed the metal strip there to conform tightly to your nose and cheeks? If not, do so. Some masks have porous foam at the top which leaks moist air, causing the fogging anyway. Toss that mask and get a real one. Good ones have a strip of aluminum on top. Learn how to seal the surfaces and you're golden.
I removed the simple wire from my cloth mask the hospital gave to me with a Starbucks bag closer wire. Two stiff but malleable wires in a plastic strip work much better than the thin original wire.
Or you can leave the mask sitting down under your nose like one of the total idiots on the street and in every building. I can't believe the number of people who would be dead if this were a real deadly pandemic. ;)
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On Friday, November 6, 2020 at 11:00:43 PM UTC-5, Larry Jaques wrote:

Yes & no. Some of the leaked air is through the mask material itself - not actually a leak. I have tightened those nose things till they threatened to give me a nose-ectomy with varying results.
This looks interesting - (Amazon.com product link shortened)Y48KO02274O&dchild=1&keywords=mask+with+hepa+filter+air+pump&qid05045254&sprefix=mask+with+hepa%2Caps%2C153&sr=8-7
I may give it a shot.
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On Wednesday, October 28, 2020 at 5:43:20 PM UTC-4, rangerssuck wrote:

My solution is to get a pair of glasses that are just for use at about 30 inches. In other words not bifocals and not progressives, but readng glasses but for a longer focal distance.
Bought from Zenni optical.
Dan
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On Sunday, November 1, 2020 at 8:24:46 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@krl.org wrote:

ar progressives, and can't just push them higher up on my face. Scouring th e internet (poking around for a half hour or so) hasn't revealed any soluti ons.

eal with this.

inches.

for a longer focal distance.

yeah, that would be fine if my entire world was 30 inches away from my face . Unfortunately, it's not like that. I'm up & down ladders, under vehicles, working on machines and sitting in front of a computer.
When sitting at the computer, I'm usually NOT wearing a mask, so that's no problem.
Zenni Rocks. Several years back, I took someone's (someone from RCM, I thin k) and bought a set of trial lenses and an adjustable frame. Wow. I could m ake a pair of glasses for each individual thing I do. Seriously, it's nice to have a set of computer glasses (again, progressives that focus from 30 i nches to 12 inches) and a set of magnifying lenses (added +2 to my normal r eading scrip). They make a huge difference when looking at tiny things.
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On 11/10/2020 2:51 PM, rangerssuck wrote:

Zenni is pretty good, but they don't seem to sell trifocals. I've tried several times to get used to progressives and ultimately holding my head at exactly the perfect angle to see in best focus drives me crazy. I did quite a bit of research and decided to try large format trifocal lenses. I can wear them all day. Its not perfect, but i was able to get used to their very predictable range of view for exchange range of viewing. I have a set of Zenni progressives with my current prescription in a case, and they look like brand new because I keep them only for cheap emergency backups. I've tried to wear them a few times, but they go back in the case pretty quickly. My optometrists answer was to try to get me to use two pairs of bifocals. They didn't even suggest it until I brought it up. Everybody is different, but for me the trifocals worked the best.
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Bob La Londe wrote:

I went with progressives but should have stayed with single vision. Astigmatism that only is really a problem out past 7-8 feet on small objects, but the doc thought they would be good working on the computer, So they normally set next to me on the desk...
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wrote:

I started using reading glasses about 40 years ago, then about 1990 my optometrist suggested "access" lenses - a small mid-range lens in the mid upper area of full size reading lenses and after discussion, we had them made up as "safety glasses" for use both at the computer and in the workshop. Now, whenever I replace my "computer glasses" the old pair move downstairs to hang outside the workshop door. Even cataract surgery has not changed this strategy! The only problem I've had is telling the difference as both pair have similar frames. At least this way I can always find a pair of safety glasses when the need arises.
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