Scrapping Monarch C lathe and Cincinnati 50 taper horizontal mill

I am buying three machines.
1) Axelson 16-48 or so lathe with moderate wear
2) Monarch 16-30 model C or some such lathe, with severe way wear
3) Cincinnati 50 taper horizontal mill.
The price is $1,000 for all.
I am thinking what to do with them. My plan, as of now, is to
1) Take the tailstock and a couple of things for the Monarch
2) Scrap the Monarch and Cincinnati for cash
3) Sell the tailstock
4) Keep, refurbish and sell the axelson.
My assumption regarding the above is that a Monarch with severe way
wear is not economically repairable.
Am I wrong about that?

Reply to
Ignoramus13761
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"Ignoramus13761" wrote in message
For one thing, refinishing the ways lowers them and misaligns the half nuts with the leadscrew. BTDT.
jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
1) Axelson lathes never die.=20
2) Way wear is mostly only a problem for the inexperienced operator--at = any rate, it would probably still work just fine for polishing rolls, = welding drivelines and so forth.
3) Agreed that the horizontal is probably more useful as a boat anchor, = although the table would probably make nice tooling for a boring mill or = horizontal cnc, or it could serve as a very nice starting point for a = heavy duty hobby type gantry style cnc milling machine.
Additionally, the electric motors are probably worth pulling out to = resell for cash.
Reply to
PrecisionmachinisT
Yes. I might even keep this Axelson for shop work. After scrapping the other two, it will be better than free.
But still, unlikely to fetch any good price. Right?
I would not pull the motors... Too much hassle and they are not too big.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus13761
"PrecisionmachinisT" wrote in message
The advice I've seen is that Monarch and Hardinge lathes aren't particularly good for general-purpose repair shop use. One poster with NIST instrument-making experience prefers South Bends for their versatility, mainly due to their stump-pulling back gears and H-shaped carriage that can overlap the head and tailstocks.
jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
You might be. Not much more effort to regind a badly worn bed than a slightly worn one. Monarchs have some lasting value, they are amazing lathes.
Jon
Reply to
Jon Elson
You build that up with Moglice. Works quite well.
Jon
Reply to
Jon Elson
amusing photos of some axelson restoration
formatting link
Reply to
Cydrome Leader
Another way to look at it is that you are running a delivery service. If you deliver to someone that wants to restore the machines, you stand to make more than delivering the same metal to the scrapyard. Why not ask around to see if anyone wants to restore a Monarch, or has a job that would work well with a big horizontal before you melt them down?
Kevin Gallimore
Reply to
axolotl
Unloading them is a big pain, as a matter of fact. So is moving them around my shop. I cannot unload that horizontal mill at all due to its weight (8k lbs). I am a freaking fool here, because I had a Toyota 10k lbs forklift, but sold it *last week* for a measly $5k profit. So now, like a fool, I cannot unload this stuff as easily.
As for people who want to rebuild them, the problem is that a lot of them are not serious and will back out of the deal.
i AM still deciding what to do, which machines to keep around.
I may keep both lathes.
We have a rebuilder here, called STK Rebuilders, I may use their services with the Axelson. I really liked it.
The Monarch, I am afraid, is beyond redemption.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus13761
What was wrong with it, lead screw bent?
Reply to
Ignoramus13761
So, what do you think I could get for a reground Monarch 16x30?
Reply to
Ignoramus13761
I am thinking, regrinding the axelson may make more sense due to its better size, the 16x30 size of the Monarch makes it not so practical.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus13761
Looks like he is straightening the chip pan
Reply to
PrecisionmachinisT
No idea what you could get. After a good rebuild, it certainly is a NICE machine. There are plenty of shops that could use such a machine for some specific purposes, and would not mind the short bed. (Obviously that could be a problem for other shops, though.)
I wasn't really suggesting YOU should take on the rebuild, though. Unless you had a specific customer in mind who had committed to it after rebuild, that would be a risk to take.
I know all about lathe rebuilds, having done a moderately big one the hard way (I don't have a monster surface grinder or traveling bedway grinder.) One concern is getting the bed to somebody to do the regrind. I imagine in the Chicago area you can at least find a shop with the necessary equipment.
Anyway, similar-sized Chinese lathes are going for close to $20K, I think, but I don't know if a grand old US lathe would be worth more or less, if restored to prime condition. These restorations may be more a labor of love than a prudent financial project.
Jon
Reply to
Jon Elson
Well, do nothing until the cash is IN HAND! No deliver first, pay later.
Jon
Reply to
Jon Elson
Jon, thanks for a well thought out opinion.
I went over there again today and, I think, the Monarch is just scrap metal. Besides the wear, a few gear shifting levers are broke, they can be fixed by welding something on, never to look good again, but it is not worth it. I took off its tailstock, I hope to be able to sell it within a year or so, to someone who lost a similar tailstock.
The Axelson lathe is potentially usable and rebuildable.
Since I will have it on my trailer and generally can easily move stuff of this size (5-6 k lbs), I will explore the possibility of a rebuild.
If, say, I can rebuild it for $2k and sell for $5k, it is a project that is fun and socially useful, and sufficiently rewarding. After scrapping two other machines, the lathe will be free to me.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus4595
Well, you certainly ought to see if anyone needs any parts off it.
Jon
Reply to
Jon Elson

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