Serious press fit

On Sun, 10 Jan 2010 06:17:24 -0500, "Karl Townsend"


First order of business - Does the Deere clutch design hold up to the work loads any better?
Second: Can you redesign the implement to lessen the load on the PTO Clutches? Or redesign the clutch to handle the load better - someone might have developed a retrofit kit to use a more robust clutch.
If it's a hydraulic load, you can put the pump off the crankshaft instead of the PTO? Or you have a split hydraulic/driveshaft load, you split the hydraulics to the crank and only leave the brush-hog drive on the PTO clutch, or....
I don't know what you are doing or how, but if you think it through there is often more than one way to skin a problem. Feel free to elaborate, and we (the collective newsgroup) might be able to come up with an elegant solution.
And of course you don't swap out all four tractors at once - you wait for the Deere dealer to get a bit hungry (or wants to do the model-year changeover) and offer a nice deal. Then pick the Ford that is oldest and/or highest hours on the engine, and trade it off. And in a few years, you do it again.
--<< Bruce >>--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Shelburne Falls, MA, same as they are now, as you well know if you have a Corvair. I'm not really missing the '65 turbo convertible body with the 4-carb 140 motor swapped in I had for a few years. It was interesting, but needed a great deal I didn't have time or money to give it to be good. Especially in the salt-fest that is the northeastern US in winter.
--
Cats, coffee, chocolate...vices to live by

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Was that a John Fitch conversion on the Corvair? That's what I had in my Monza convertible. In fact, I had the full Fitch treatment, except for the Michelin tires and the short-stroke shift-lever riser.
--
Ed Huntress



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I doubt it - I think/suspect it was just a motor swapped in when the turbo motor got swapped out, well before my time.
--
Cats, coffee, chocolate...vices to live by

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 10 Jan 2010 16:48:34 -0500, Ecnerwal

WRONG. Because that's where Larry and Marty and Doc were ordering them from in bulk for their shops. I wasn't picky, whoever I was closest to at the moment I picked up a spare for in the trunk - that inevitably ended up pressed into service much sooner than expected.
And I suspect that Clarks, Cotrofeld and Corvair Underground were all sourcing the same supplier, too. Because they ALL died till they cycled through the old stock.
--<< Bruce >>--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Practice makes perfect. A friend of mine just sold his car service shop and retired; he was very good, and would tackle anything. I used to spend an hour or two every once in a while talking to him and watching him work (he was also very sociable and tolerant <g>). The thing that amazed me was the way he could cut through all of the stuff and get right to the part that needed work. Since he worked on my cars and I always used to own at least two manuals for each, one the factory manual, and had studied most jobs before I decided to turn them over to him, I knew he wasn't following the manuals at all.
I concluded that if I wasn't having fun, I wouldn't do the jobs myself. Thinking about how an experienced mechanic could do the job in 1/10th the time it took me gave me a shot of reality about saving money by doing it myself.
But some of it is still fun -- or it would be, if I had a car that was fun to work on. Sports cars were fun.
--
Ed Huntress



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Your hands are too big, I bet.
War story: In the early 1970s, a penurious friend asked me to repair the lightmeter on her old Nikon (F1?). The repair was easy - just solder the wire back onto the meter, and lace the wire down with waxed dental floss so it wouldn't flop and break.
Then I tried to put the camera back together. No dice - fingers too large. This brought to mind those advertising shots of the assembly area, with ranks of benches each with a five-foot-nothing woman at work. Their thumbs might be the size of my pinky. Laughed, took camera back apart, lengthened the wires, and then was able to reassemble the camera.
Joe Gwinn
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

They're not very big, but they're a lot bigger than those of the average Asian woman, I suspect.
They don't have nearly enough joints to do the job, either. I think you need about five in each finger, and they have to bend in all axes.
BTW, I can change a bulb in the left headlamp in roughly 2 minutes. In the right headlamp, it's a half-hour plus. And I need bent-tip needle-nose pliers to release the spring clamp. I've had to replace the right bulb twice, and my blood pressure probably jumped 20 points each time.

There's usually a solution. Sometimes it requires re-design. <g>
--
Ed Huntress



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've heard that they are very flexible.
Joe Gwinn

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
JR North wrote:

Press fits require pretty much the same tolerances, just on the negative clearance side. I'd say it has a lot more to do with eliminating the cost of milling a key slot, broaching a pulley, and providing a key.... But otherwise I totally agree.
Jon
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The weird thing there is that while Toyota gets the pulley right, in general the 3.0 Toyota engine and the 1990 pickup it's installed in is the miserable vehicle to work on that I've ever owned. My 2000 Intrepid and 2007 Dakota are immeasurably better.
--
As we enjoy great advantages from the inventions of others, we should
be glad of an opportunity to serve others by any invention of ours;
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Is that the Intrepid where your spark plug wires are run under the intake manifold? I seem to remember a cow-orker bitching about that.
Wes -- "Additionally as a security officer, I carry a gun to protect government officials but my life isn't worth protecting at home in their eyes." Dick Anthony Heller
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, and I've seen other people complain they're impossible. The thing is, the car uses coil-on-plug ignition, so I have yet to need to replace them. We'll see when the time comes....
(I'll just note that on the Toyota I complained about recently, access to the PCV valve is blocked by the intake manifold plenum, and over a dozen hoses are bolted to the underside of that plenum)
--
As we enjoy great advantages from the inventions of others, we should
be glad of an opportunity to serve others by any invention of ours;
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Just in time!

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I had to replace the input flange on a German 10,000 rpm 500 hp AC dynamometer. The flange mounted on the slightly tapered stator shaft, about 65 mm in diameter. Same deal, pump up to 2000 bar and pull off with a slight push. Replacing was the reverse, a small bolt in the end of the shaft with a washer to bear on the flange, and crank up the pressure. The flange just glides into place. Very neat, but one small scratch in the near mirror finished shaft surface and I'd guess your screwed. A lot nicer than some other dynos I've worked on with shrink fit straight shafts with keys.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 8 Jan 2010 22:36:28 -0800 (PST), oldjag
SNIP

Hey Jag,
Jeeessssuuuussss !!!!!!!!!! A 500 horse, ten thousand RPM, ANYTHING is kinda a sight to see, but on a 2-1/2" shaft?!?! Wow !!!!
Scary!!
Brian Lawson, Bothwell, Ontario.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 09 Jan 2010 15:16:36 -0500, the infamous Brian Lawson

Sounds sorta like the li'l 4-cyl Indy engines made by Offenhauser. Remember their high-pitched whine as they shot past TV cameras? Wunnerful memory, that.
From the Offy wiki: "When Ford came on to the scene in 1963, the Offy lost its dominion over Indy car racing, although it remained competitive through the mid 1970s even with the advent of turbocharging. Before turbo boost limits, over 1,000 bhp (750 kW) could be attained using around 120 in Hg (44.3 psi) pressure. The final 2.65 litre 4 cyl Offy, restricted to 80 in Hg (24.6 psi) turbo pressure, gave 770 bhp (570 kW) at 9,000 rpm. However, the Ford Cosworth DFX soon proved to be unbeatable and the Offy's last victory came at Trenton in 1978, in the hands of Gordon Johncock's Wildcat. The last time an Offy-powered car raced was at Pocono in 1982 for the Domino's Pizza Pocono 500, in an Eagle chassis driven by Jim McElreath, although two Vollstedt chassis with Offenhauser engines failed to qualify for the 1983 Indianapolis 500."
--============================================-- Growing old is mandatory; growing up is optional. --- http://diversify.com/handypouches.html ToolyRoo(tm) and Possum(tm) Handy Pouches NOW AVAILABLE!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

How do these couplings work? I've having problems visualizing.
Thanks,
Wes
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm still curious. Can anyone explain how the coupling works?
Wes -- "Additionally as a security officer, I carry a gun to protect government officials but my life isn't worth protecting at home in their eyes." Dick Anthony Heller
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I came across this while looking for a different type of hydraulic coupling... http://www.skf.com/portal/skf/home/products?maincatalogue=1&lang=en&newlink _1_6
There are detailed mounting/demounting instructions in the downloads at the bottom of the page.
--
Ned Simmons

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.