slip roll?

I have located a 30" sheet metal slip roll in my general area. It's about 2
hours away by car. It isn't new, looks to be solid old US. I have only seen
one photo.
The seller states that there is no maker's name on it anywhere, nor any
nameplate data. Is there any way to infer the max thickness it can handle?
He says there is surface rust on the rolls. I figure I can knock most of it
off easily with a 3M pad and just use it. Does this make sense to you?
Thanks,
GWE
Reply to
Grant Erwin
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I have never used one, but can't a person make multiple passes on the material and increase the curve each pass? Is this a motor driven roll or a hand-cranked unit?
I guess you could crank up the top roll and insert a straight edge and measure from the bottom of the straight edge to the bottom of the middle roll.
How far can you go in two hours, given the traffic problems in Puget Sound area?
Used to live in Issaquah area.
best regards,
Paul
Reply to
co_farmer
Hand cranked. To my knowledge, all slip rolls use multiple passes.
The difference between an opening that will admit 22 gauge and 16 gauge is only a few thousandths. I doubt max opening is related. I suspect it will have to do with the diameter and length of the rolls.
I can go a long ways. I just don't go where/when the traffic is. It might take me longer to get back, though.
Ah. That explains your traffic concern. That place has the very worst traffic in the area.
GWE
Reply to
Grant Erwin
You can infer some by gauging the thickness of the frame and rollers. Generally, I would assume for a 30" unit, max would be around 20-22ga. MAYBE 18ga. JR Dweller in thecellar
Grant Erw> I have located a 30" sheet metal slip roll in my general area. It's about 2
Reply to
JR North
You didn't give address and phone number and GPS coordinates of the location.
I have been looking for one about that size that'll handle 16 Ga. It seems from my unscientific research that if the rolls are 1 1/2" or 2" diameter, the thing is probably limited to about 20 Ga. 3" rolls and hefty looking bearing surfaces would indicate 16 Ga. I, of course, want one the has 1 1/2" diameter rolls only needs to be 30 inches wide AND does 16 Ga. Also, I have noticed that finding 16 GA machines in the 30" range and narrower are very hard to do. EX: the only HF slip roll I find that handles 16 GA is 50 inches wide and costs about $900. I have looked around some with no better results. OTOH, I do have a friend that has a slip roll that is only 12" wide and 3" diameter rolls. (too short for my needs.)
While I was searching (unsuccessfully) for the website of a local company that sells this stuff used, I ran across this neat webpage on how to run a slip (plate) roll:
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Pete Stanaitis --------------------
Grant Erw> I have located a 30" sheet metal slip roll in my general area. It's about 2
Reply to
spaco
Max capacity is pretty much a function of the roller diameter and length. A 30" with 1-1/2" diameter roll would be 22 or 24 ga , 2" roll should go to something like 20 ga or maybe 18 ga.
A rough roll finish will transfer over to the finished product. If you don't do polished work, it shouldn't matter too much.
These things aren't too expensive on the used market or new imports. A nice new one from Grizzly is less than $500
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I have located a 30" sheet metal slip roll in my general area. It's about 2
Reply to
RoyJ
Can't help with the thickness but I currently have on loan an old 36" x 2" diameter roller slip roll, I would like to know its capacity. I got it from my mate who had been storing it with a mate, the mate had it outside and with no apparent protection. I put the rollers in my old 11" x 40" lathe and ran a belt sander over them and they cleaned up a treat, far better than the rusty things I got after storage outside. They did the intended taper rolling job fine and I still have them taking up space, must get them moved now the owner has more than ample indoor storage for them.
Reply to
David Billington
Just for some gee whiz entertainment: I worked briefly as a welder at a OEM boiler manufacturer. They had a roller that could form 2.5 inch thick or better steel into boiler bodies. It was HUGE......as in GIANT......as in it wouldn't fit in your shop BIG. Dave
Reply to
dav1936531
Not that big but one of the rolls in the shop I started in had a roll that did 8' wide x26' long x3/8" thick into 8' diameter tubes. Run by an old gent that had serious problems with basic math. But us fabricators really appreciated that his stuff was ROUND. Dead on round. Made life so much easier to assemble...........
dav1936531 wrote:
Reply to
RoyJ
I appreciate everyone's input. Assuming it turns out to be a 20 gauge roll, can you roll thicker pieces if they are only e.g. 6" wide? For example, could you get away with rolling a tube from 16 gauge steel 6x20"? With the 6" side fed into the rolls, I mean.
Grant
Reply to
Grant Erwin
If the size fits your needs, why not buy it? The rust will go away and you will find its capacity when you try to roll something too big and the rolls are bent afterwards. :-) Seriously, finding slip rolls in the same size and comparing the roll's diameters you will get a ballpark. And old iron is always better than Chinese cast iron with 30% sand in it.
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller

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