Springs with a washer welded on each end?

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-RDHWnBBu2Yc/ULWYEWjhwzE/AAAAAAAAABY/zxB4WR9M_Dc/s272-c/November272012
I need to secure a spring to an object with a bolt sticking out
of it. It will undergo rotational torque.
I have acquired a nut that fits the bolt.
I could use a spring with a washer welded to each end. Is there a way to accomplish that without welding?
I could use some terminology, if I end up buying something online. If that part exists, what are they called?
Thanks.
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John Doe <jdoe usenetlove.invalid> wrote:

RDHWnBBu2Yc/ULWYEWjhwzE/AAAAAAAAABY/zxB4WR9M_Dc/s272-c/November272012
What would be really cool would be a put a slipping clutch on that thing, like the slipping clutch that's on a cordless drill.
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I need a gas-powered cordless drill...
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Nevermind...
I'm thinking a torque limiting shaft coupling is what I want to use.
I might ask about that later.
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On 12/5/2012 11:08 PM, John Doe wrote:

Even so, here's a simple technique that's very good at retention under tension. I can't say how it would resist a torque load. 'Course it would depend upon the torque.
http://home.comcast.net/~bobengelhardt/SpringClamp.jpg
Also, I have _brazed_ to the ends of a spring, to make a torque guage. I would recommend brazing rather than welding - the heat of welding is likely to do bad things to the spring. I.e., make the HAZ brittle.
Bob
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https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-RDHWnBBu2Yc/ULWYEWjhwzE/AAAAAAAAABY/zxB4WR9M_Dc/s272-c/November272012

Yeah, turn custom washers with tophat-like cylindrical extensions that the spring fits over tightly. They are more secure if you thread the extension to match the spring. Got a lathe yet?
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"Jim Wilkins" <muratlanne gmail.com> wrote:

How much of an investment is required for doing that?
And speaking of confusion... I don't understand why, out of all the metal workers in this group, none offer a metalworking service.
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On 12/6/2012 6:18 PM, John Doe wrote:

I'd guess that it's primarily because it's _rec_.crafts.metalworking. Bob
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Here's a start: http://www.grizzly.com/products/7-x-12-Mini-Metal-Lathe/G8688 This outfit has information and support for small hobby lathes: http://littlemachineshop.com/
Personally I'd try to find a local source for the small lathe that can sell you the accessories you'll need as you progress. There are three near me. Or look for used machines. The most recent CL ads here: http://nh.craigslist.org/tls/3455302527.html http://nh.craigslist.org/tls/3457594364.html
I started with a second-hand Sears lathe about that size that was quite useful on aluminum and brass but not really up to cutting steel. Then I jumped to an industrial South Bend lathe, so I don't have hands-on experience with currently available hobby-sized machines. If anyone has the Harbor Freight one, please speak up. I bought some lathe accessories such as a Morse taper 3-jaw chuck from them that were acceptable for hobby work.

We went over that with Morris Dovey's high pressure nickel-hydrogen fusion reactor experiment. Hobbyists don't have liability insurance for when you f%^k up and kill yourself anywhere near parts that can be traced back to us. I worked for Segway and know the big risks that ride on small wheels.
jsw
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"Jim Wilkins" <muratlanne gmail.com> wrote:

Individuals make and sell things to other people all day every day, at least here on Earth.
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>
> jsw
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Then you should rely on a commercial machine shop for your needs. jsw
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My needs change from time to time. They don't always require a lathe. Even when my first method might indicate using a lathe, often times I end up being able to accomplish what I need to do, with something else.
--

"Jim Wilkins" <muratlanne gmail.com> wrote:

> Path: eternal-september.org!mx04.eternal-september.org!.POSTED!not-for-mail
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Generally, such things are designed so the spring is captive on a rod, the rod being secured to the surface by whatever means is necessary and the part that bounces on the spring has a clearance hole for the rod. Think recoil spring assembly on that latest semi-auto pistols.
Stan
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