Storing GTAW filler

Guys,
I have a bunch of tubes of 36" filler rods for all sorts of different materials and I'm not going to be using my gear for a while due to an
upcoming back surgery in Jan. I am thinking of just making some 6" dia PVC pipe with a threaded tops and a capped bottoms and sealing them well. What I'm wondering is should I put desiccant packs in the tubes and/or put Schrader valves on them and vacuum evacuate the air out or purge them with nitrogen gas or another gas to prevent or slow down degradation of the filler. I sometimes see that I have dulled filler and I just wipe them down with steel wool or MEK on a shop towel. Just looking to protect my investments. Any ideas or things you use to protect your fillers? I am not about to dump $15.00 on the store bought cute little 36" containers for rod when I can make it for pennies on the dollar and do it better.
Thanks gang,
Rob
Fraser Competition Engines Chicago, IL.
PS: I'm still going to be in CA on the 11th so let the good times roll before I get chopped up again.
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Rob Fraser wrote:

I think it would help if you told us what kind of filler or fillers you're talking about...
As for the store bought vs. home built, if you price out the PVC pipe, thread adapters, threaded plugs and caps along with the primer and cement, you aren't saving anything over store bought rod containers unless you're using up leftovers you already have.
I have one of the store bought rod holders which houses both my 70S2 and 4043 rods, no desiccant packs, and I don't seem to have any issues.
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For storing 7018 rod, I used a rod oven that doubles its duty as a foot warmer. For TIG rod, all you need is to keep rust away, so anything that would keep humidity down would be fine. For example, an old fridge with a light bulb.
i
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Iggy, I wish I had that much filler in stock! I think I only have about 40-50 lbs. to manage. I figure I'll use 3-4 6" sections to hold all the stuff I have.
Rob
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You can use the SO's oven to dry it back out. But, be careful. I was drying a load while she was gone and it had a bit of grease on it. She came back early and I caught holy hell. Karl
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I luckily live alone and my girlfriend laughed her ass off a few weeks ago when she went to put dishes into the dishwasher. I had a set of new pistons and rods hanging from the top where you would put glasses. I had a bunch of wrenches and a crankshaft from a 426 Hemi that I had to cut a second keyway in for a blower hub and some opening on the oil passages and I just tossed it in to get the cutting fluids and steel fuzz off before final cleaning. It's not the first time something from the shop wound up in the dishwasher at home. Too lazy to run it to the shop and hot tank it.
Rob
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On Fri, 23 Nov 2007 17:51:45 -0600, "Karl Townsend"

Hey Karl, buy her a new stove/oven for Christmas and put th' old one in yer shop. You won't believe how often you'll use it, and she'll be all lovey dovey on ya fer weeks <g>.
Snarl
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I tried that appliance thing, ONCE. About our second year I got her a washing machine for Christmass. Things were pretty cold in bed for weeks. haven't tried that again.
karl
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On Sat, 24 Nov 2007 13:21:24 -0600, with neither quill nor qualm,

You forgot to fill it with sexy lingerie, Karl.
--
"Given the low level of competence among politicians,
every American should become a Libertarian."
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I used to work for a FAA jet engine repair station and they stored most of there rod in a cleaning station tank that was full of Acetone , I think the Feds require this procedure , Phil L. "Rob Fraser" <FraserRacing"AT"RobFraser.Net> wrote in message

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Ignoramus24248 wrote:

For steel GTAW filler, it's copper coated so rust isn't an issue. If he has stainless or AL rod humidity again isn't an issue. Flux coated rods for SMAW are of course a different matter.
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snip-----

If only that were true of the aluminum filler. I put mine in storage while building our shop, and ruined it from moisture. Understand that we live where we were getting about 60" of rain annually, and the filler was in storage, in an aluminum ocean going storage container for about 4 years. I still have it, but it's coated fully with aluminum oxide. I've yet to try cleaning it, or even using any, but I expect it's worthless.
Protecting any TIG filler is a good idea, even stainless.
Harold
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On 2007-11-23, Rob Fraser <FraserRacing> wrote:

I meant a little fridge, like those that fit under a countertop or some such.
i
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I have some oil hardening and air hardening TIG filler rod that isn't coated.
i
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Ignoramus24248 wrote:

If I recall, the OP is an engine guy, so he probably isn't dealing with any sort of hard facing rod.
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Harold and Susan Vordos wrote:

Last I knew, pretty much all AL surfaces are fully coated with AL oxide unless they are cleaned and kept in an inert atmosphere.
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Heh! I'm not sure you understand how my rod looks!
Yes, Pete-----I understand-----and I agree-----it's virtually impossible to eliminate aluminum oxide from forming----it does so almost instantaneously-----but what I'm talking about is the return of aluminum to it's native form as ore. The rod in question looks like hell, not just dull in appearance.
The point is, if there is enough moisture present, it won't stop degrading. A preventive measure, to eliminate moisture, will insure it remains viable. Simply storing it in a closed tube or sorts would likely work. Sure would be better than what I did------which was nothing. I was thinking the same way you are.
Harold
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I've used a vacuum packer bought from Fred Meyer's to store a bunch of backpacking and camping gear in. You can cut the bag material to any length, seal one end, put in a bunch of rod, then vacuum pack it. The machines are easy to use, and I've yet to lose vacuum on stuff I've packed away several years ago.
Next to an inert atmosphere, perhaps next to no atmosphere will turn the trick for you!
--
Tin Lizzie
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On Fri, 23 Nov 2007 12:58:36 -0600, "Rob Fraser" <FraserRacing"AT"RobFraser.Net> wrote:>Guys,

Your approach should work well, purged and backfilled with dry N2 or argon. Rather than the cost of threaded ends and plugs, I'd bet that caps sealed with duct tape would suffice nicely.
I've found that spools of MIG wire keep well in an ordinary large ziplock freezer bag purged and backfilled with argon. I know that polyethylene is not completely impermeable to oxygen or water vapor, but the approach seems to work for at least several years.
If you can find mylar or saran (polyvinylidene fluoride) sheet stock and a heat sealer, making bags of that purged with argon or N2 and then heat sealed should be excellent archival storage.
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Don Foreman wrote:

Vacuum packing with a FoodSaver would probably work fine for MIG wire or stick rods, the long TIG filler might be a bit awkward, but probably still workable.
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