Super Glue Holds Your Car Together

There was a fairly long article in The Wall Street Journal on how the
car makers are using new kinds of adhesives to glue and rivet cars
together, to reduce weight. This is being done with aluminum and
steel. One problem with aluminum is that it's hard to spotweld.
"Super Glue Holds Your Car Together - Those Aren't Bolts Holding Your
Car Together", James R. Hagerty and Mike Ramsey, page B1 of the 9
September 2014 issue of the WSJ.
Unfortunately, it's behind a paywall, but just about every library in
the country gets the WSJ.
Joe Gwinn
Reply to
Joe Gwinn
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Thanks, Joe. I'll be using that one.
Often you can sneak up on a WSJ article without going through the paywall. In this case, they've changed the headline of the article, so it's a little trickier.
This does it. In Google or whatever, search on "Super Glues Are the Secret to Making Cars Lighter." Use the quotes, or not. Try the WSJ article. Usually, you can get in (I just did). There will be popups asking you to subscibe but you can just close them.
Another joining method under development is laser welding. It solves some problems they've had with conventional spot welding in AHSS (Advanced High-Strength Steel).
Reply to
Ed Huntress
Welcome.
I'll try this too. I have paid electronic access to the WSJ (costs a little more when got as a package with the dead-tree version), but many RCM folk get neither.
Or laser weld plus glue, for all the same reasons?
Joe Gwinn
Reply to
Joe Gwinn
I don't know yet. I've been working on other things, but I'll be getting to it soon.
We had a discussion here a week or two ago in which it was pointed out that the use of adhesives in car assembly is a bit different from their use in aircraft. Especially when they're using a combined method -- rivet bonding or weld bonding -- you have to look carefully at what they're trying to accomplish. Sometimes they're just trying to avoid peel and cleavage loads on the adhesive by using the rivets or welds at the edges, as in aircraft assembly. Other times they're trying to use the adhesive to avoid repreated shear loads on the metal fasteners, which tends to loosen the rivets or overload the welds.
When I get to it, and write something, I'll post a link.
Reply to
Ed Huntress
Yeah, the major aircraft makers have been using rivet bonding, using epoxy, since the '70s. Mostly it's been for wing and fuselage skins. I wrote my first article about it around 1978.
Reply to
Ed Huntress
Did work too well for Grumman. Can't remember off hand if it was the Yankee or what the model was, but they have virtually 0 resale value because of bonding and corrosion issues.
Reply to
clare
Like most things to do with aircraft, it took a while to get it right. Epoxy and aluminum are not an easy marriage.
Reply to
Ed Huntress
As a plane builder I definitely would not try it. Definitely needs a (well) engineered solution.
Reply to
clare
Yep. I use panel bonding on many different repairs. Works a treat when you're doing something like a rocker panel but don't want to rip the interior out. If you prep the panels correctly, use the proper adhesive in the correct temperature and it holds VERY well. Plus it has the advantage of acting as a sealant so the seam doesn't rot out. Quite a few vehicles out there with some bonded panels.
Went to a class for the new Ford aluminum repairs. Fun stuff. I'm really glad I won't be doing those repairs for a LONG time. Already have enough money tied up in the rest of my gear.
Reply to
Steve W.

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