Formula for Super Glue accelerant?

Looking for a simple formula for super glue (CA) accelerant like Zip-Kicker or equivalent.
Best I've been able to find out, it's a mixture of naptha and acetone,
but in what proportions and with anything else?
Zip-Kicker is $8.00 for a 4-oz bottle. I can buy a quart of acetone and a quart of naptha for the same amount. Mix my own. Not have to wait for the old fart down at the hobby shop to decide to actually open up for business. (His business is a hobby, I guess.)
Metal content: I use super glue to seal and protect the handles of my knives.
-Frank
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Anything that supplies OH- ions will do it. This means bases, (and also just moisture, as water has some free OH- ions). Baking soda is very commonly used and also helps fill gaps.
Tim.
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Frank J Warner writes:

Do those mix? Polar vs non-polar solvents?
Some MSDSs list n-heptane, so naphtha (note spelling) is a candidate. Cleverly disguised as Coleman fuel at Wal-Mart.
Some MSDSs list ethyl acetate. Dunno of a convenient source for that.
Touching with a lip, eyelid, or other sensitive body part seems to reliably kick off the polymerization.
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Or as Zipo lighter fluid, if you only want a small quantity.

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Bet you thought you were going to get me to lick of my kniveth to find out, didn't you?
-Frank
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Frank J Warner wrote:

I believe the old standard was baking soda. ...lew...
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On Wed, 06 Apr 2005 02:26:40 GMT, Lew Hartswick

Most now have amines. Nasty.
Pete Keillor
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Just curious: how long does it take to cure without accelerant, and how fast would you like it to cure? Bob
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Frank
Try raw linseed oil.
A common woodwind finish these days is raw linseed oil (not boiled, raw like you get at art stores as a solvent) catalyzed with superglue. Way I usually use it is slosh some on a quartered paper towel and put a few drops of superglue on. Wipe quickly and smoothly across the wood. I usually do it on a lathe at sanding speeds which makes it easier. Do that 2 - 3 times, polish with a flannel cloth and you've got a waterproof hard finish in about a minute. Biggest problem is if you are too slow or hesitate you get lumps.
Jim
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This sounds like a modern version of the old-school high gloss finish for furniture, French polish. In which you use a shellac moistened pad coated with a few drops of linseed oil. It is applied by hand rubbing repeatedly until a deep, glossy, hard finish appears. Sort of like spit-shining the wood.
Randy

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wrote:

Yep, same concept that hit me. I first encountered this type of finish when, at the suggestion of the woodshop teacher, I did a turned lamp in it - Shellac-dipped pad with a few drops of plain old motor oil, quickly apply to spinning piece at high RPMs, re-dip, re-drip, re-apply until piece is thoroughly coated, then knock the speed down about half, and go after the piece with super-fine steel wool to knock off any "lumpies", jack the speed back up, and repeat the process as desired.
Makes a perfectly gorgeous finish that looks, feels, and "wears" like the piece was somehow coated in glass.
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Interesting. I have linseed oil, boiled and raw. Might try this process on some scrap.
I don't finish my pieces in a lathe. These are contoured wooden handles for knives. Each one is finished by hand. The superglue finish is an accepted method of sealing and protecting unstabilized wood. Gives a perfectly smooth, glass-like finish.
-Frank
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On Fri, 08 Apr 2005 11:34:59 -0700, Frank J Warner

Frank, I asked my dentist why superglue wasn't used with fillings and he said it's water soluble. That's also why it can be used in emergency surgery or wound closing because it dissolves over time. I'm surprised it works well for knife handles. Does it ever wear off? Eric
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On Fri, 08 Apr 2005 11:34:59 -0700, Frank J Warner

Frank, can that be applied over existing wood finishes?
I've got four 10' L x 26" W x 2" thick old bowling alley lane sections I'm using as work bench tops. I cut th' width down from 42" and used th' remaining 16" for back splashes. I'm not sure what they used to seal those with, I want to say some kind of a clear acrylic, then an oiled finish.
Guess I should just try it on a section and see what happens? I'd really rather not take them back down to bare wood if possible.
And if any of you have th' opportunity to be around when an old bowling alley is being torn down, this stuff is *great* for work bench tops! They're sitting on top of a slew of old, steel, kitchen cabinets I scored from Fort Lewis when they upgraded th' on base housing a couple of years ago. Total cost for forty lineal feet of cabinets (both lowers and uppers, even lazy susan corner units) and th' bowling lanes was $150 plus gas/time to get 'em. It's a beautiful thing <g>.
Snarl
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Frank J Warner wrote:

simple green and water 50/50 mixture in a spray bottle Don
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I'll try that.
-Frank
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