Tab Washer

I finally got around to putting the (new to me) quill back together so I can
take the Hurco mill back to its original configuration. Seemed like one
thing after another. Been busy with customers and family of course, and
then when I had everything (I thought) read to assemble the push tube on my
12 ton press decided to collapse. I can't complain. I bought it used 15
years ago from my dad when he upgraded to a 20 ton. I got a lot of use out
of it. I figured what the heck. Time for me to upgrade as well. Nobody
had one in stock locally. I ordered one a few weeks ago. They keep giving
me excuses, but no press. Finally, I got tired of waiting and repaired my
12 ton with a solid rod instead of the hollow pipe it had before. I also
added a reinforcing plate that guides my push rod a little better than the
original setup. Should last a few more years, and who knows, my new 20 ton
might show up some day.
Anyway, I put the quill back together today and noted that the locking tab
washer that holds the retaining nut in place is chewed off. The inner tab
is almost totally gone. I suppose I can cut one, but I don't think I have
any sheet as strong as the steel used for that washer. I figured I'ld buy
one. Only thing is I haven't a clue where. I tried McMaster, but either
they don't have any, or I don't know what they call it.
Picture:
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Now, to go rummage around in the shop and see what I have that might do.

Reply to
Bob La Londe
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For a starting place I would look at skf.com and "locking washers" . They're a standard commodity item and unless yours are special should be readily available off the shelf. Have a look at what is available there and report back, if they can't provide what you want.
Reply to
David Billington
Bearing Lock Washer looks like the term I need to search for. Looks like a Timken TW106 might do the job.
Reply to
Bob La Londe
Motion Industries and Fastenal both list it. Neither seems to have on-line store inventory anymore.

Reply to
Bob La Londe
"Bob La Londe" fired this volley in news:m6ftdo$lp4$ snipped-for-privacy@dont-email.me:
I don't know that they have it, but try VXB.com. I get a lot of one-offs and oddball bearing stuff from them.
Lloyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
Is there any chance you can weld or braze a tab inside the ring? Or have a local shop do so?
Reply to
James Waldby
James Waldby fired this volley in news:m6g21l$b5g$2 @dont-email.me:
Bob IS "the local shop".
Yeah. I imagine he could do that; but I'm guessing that, like me, he'd rather put an authentic replacement on it than bodge something together.
Lloyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
Thanks for the vote of confidence Lloyd. Actually, I had drawn it up in CB already and was planning to cut one out on the Charter Oak mill, but I couldn't find anything in the shop I trusted to make the part except a piece of spring steel sheet I am saving for another project. I have several pieces of steel I could have made the part out of including old alarm boxes, but all of it is too soft in my opinion for the application. I suppose I could have cut it out of something and case hardened it with some cherry red, but then it was starting to look like way to much of a project for a washer. LOL. I ordered a TW106 from the local Motion Industries store. They say it should be here Tuesday, but it was almost closing time. I bet it won't be here until Wednesday.
Things could get interesting in the next few months. I'm finally going to start building my hybrid machines over the holidays if I get the Hurco back in service in its original configuration. I need the 13"+ Y of the Hurco to do some stuff, and the 27"+ X of the Charter Oak machine to do some of the other stuff. My design has changed dramatically since I first drew it up.

Reply to
Bob La Londe
Why not take 1 piece of sheet steel and 1 plasma cutter, then go to town. That shouldn't take long at all. Put a nail through it for the diameter cuts, then hack out the crenellations.
BTW, Bob, that's the key word, crenellated. What diameter? You might find one at an auto parts store. I used to see them as front axle bearing retainers _many_ moons ago.
Reply to
Larry Jaques
Sadly a plasma cutter is still on my wish list. I could cut it out on one of the mills, but I didn't have sheet on hand I trusted to hold up. I know I could have case hardened just about anything, but then it became an awfully involved project for just a washer. Once I found out what to call it I didn't have to much time finding one in a Timken part number. Fastenal and Motion industries both listed the part number on their website so I stopped by the local stores. The guys at Motion Industries said I should have it by Tuesday (but I am betting on Wendesday) so I just ordered one and moved on to other projects.
I have not seen one used on a wheel bearing, but that's not a bad idea. I may try an auto parts store next time around. Variants of them are common on boat props.

Reply to
Bob La Londe
Hey Bob,
Commonly called a "WO-#" washer and goes with an "NO-#" nut. Example would be a "WO-5" washer goes with an "NO-5" nut. Really cheap to buy either/both new at any bearing supply store.
Here's a chart to find your size:
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Take care.
Brian Lawson.
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Reply to
Brian Lawson

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