the PRC strikes again !

formatting link
That 707 he has is not only an enviormental poluter.... it is also does not meet the noise abatement standards for most airports in the US. The older jet aircraft get around this little problem by backing off on the power when they cross over the monitoring stations off the end of the takeoff patterns.
Those old 707s would leave a trail of smoke behind them on takeoff.
John
Reply to
John
Loading thread data ...
Cant they be "re-engined" to a more modern powerplant? For those that are still in service.
I'm aware that its not a viable commercial airliner. (Almost fit for the museum i think?) I would assume that it might make an effective private business jet if it can be updated reasonably? if a capacity of 100 is a business requirement for a corporate jet
Reply to
Brent
It can be re-engined, but it is not cost efficient for commercial service due to the limited seating, and cargo space. The last figure I had back in the late 80's was 4 million an engine, not a very good investment. Elvis ran a convair 880 that was a pig, but then fuel was still not that expensive. Most of the older commercial jets went overseas where the noise and polution regulations were non existant before they got scrapped.
John
Reply to
John
In the early 80's you could buy a Vickers Vicount for 100 grand from the scrap yard before they cut them up.
John
Reply to
John
Doubtful. Much more likely, it was made on worn-out equipment that was _sold_for_scrap_ in this country, moved to the PRC, and reassembled.
[...]
I don't, whenever I have the choice.
But you don't have to buy American, to avoid buying Chinese. The quality of tooling from Taiwan and Korea is *much* better than it used to be. Of course, it's not on a par with American, Canadian, Aussie, or German engineering, for example, but still light-years ahead of most of the garbage coming out of China or India.
Tried buying a pair of casual shoes lately, that weren't made in China?
Reply to
Doug Miller
Westjet, here in Canada has been buying new airplanes rather than continuing to maintain as many older ones. The savings in maintainance are huge, as well as the savings in fuel. Add to that the reduction of one crew member up front, and the planes save enough money to justify the spending.
Cheers Trevor Jones
Reply to
Trevor Jones
I dont think aircraft depreciate very quickly so odds are Westjet woulnt be taking a big loss on the aircraft between being "new" and being "low hours"
Reply to
Brent
They started out with what amounted to a fleet of used airplanes. The planes they got rid of were costing them money in the long term, esp. in maintenance. I am certain that they had paid for themselves already.
The new ones get better mileage, fly farther, carry more pax, and run fewer crew. Altogether a decent deal.
Like as not their used fleet went to a Central American airline, or a startup feeder somewhere where a 737 still looks viable if it comes cheap enough to offset the operating costs, or they were bought to be brought up to specs before being resold.
I saw a bunch of the airframes that became the fleet of Greyhound Air, before they were bought out. They were pretty rough looking airframes under a glossy new paint job.
Cheers Trevor Jones
Reply to
Trevor Jones
Aircraft depreciate by hours used. Most components are on a time life overhaul/exchange. Engines , fuel pumps, landing gear motors, all have to be overhauled at the end of their designated life. The costs of some of these parts are astronomical.The cost of a hot section inspection on an engine will knock your socks off if something wrong if found.
John
Reply to
John
A few months back, a friend of mine bought a warehouse full of aircraft parts. The company had been evicted from the same complex where my friend leased, and the landlord told him he could take everything in the warehouse for $1000 provided he hauled it all away that weekend. He called me to comment (or really to gloat) and I told him I have no comment. I have no idea what is involved in selling aircraft parts, or if those parts are even worth anything.
Turns out he only sold a few of the parts to aircraft parts dealers and the rest was sold as scrap. I know he tossed all the files and paperwork in the dumpster when he moved the parts to his warehouse ( dont think he stopped to think aircraft parts might require special record keeping). There were ALOT of parts there ( someone told him they were mostly 727 components). I dont know anything about aircraft parts but there were alot of screw type actuators and alot of avionic type stuff, he had a few strange aircraft? jacks, windows, and a whole lot of other stuff. I've always wondered if there was more money there than what he made on it.
Reply to
art
Probably lot's more even as rebuildable cores.
Aviation regulations make all the variuos ISO operations look like a paperwork cakewalk. Recordkeeping and clear taceable lines of control are a lot of what drives the prices up, and limits the amount of potentially dangerous parts that get back into the air.
Some stuff like engines finds a fairly decent market price for non-aviation related uses, from jet trucks through generator or pumping station motors on pipelines, but most of the stuff needs it's certifications to be worth more than scrap, unless it has some other use. Even then you could find yourself sitting on millions of dollars worth of junk noone wants to buy. To starve to death a rich man. Fun.
Cheers Trevor Jones
Reply to
Trevor Jones
I wonder though, even if he had kept the files from the office, if he could have sold the parts? The paper work must have been in the name of the evicted company and there really wouldn't have been any paper trail from that company to my friend's company, and my friends company is a small non aviation machine shop (which I have no idea but will assume shouldn't even be touching aircraft parts ).
Anyways... didn't mean to drag this thread off topic. It just immediately poped into my head when you guys started talking about aircraft parts.
cheers, Art
Reply to
art
If you got the documentation it is worth a lot. If not it would only be worth a little more than scrap. One of those accuators could be worth five grand or more with the overhaul paper work. The avionic equipment could be worth a lot or not much depending on the age. Flight director and autopilot controllers tend to hold their value more than avionics. Radar stuff is worth a lot if it is overhauled. Some of the magnetrons are worth over ten grand. Even worn tires are worth money. They recap them. They can be recapped so many times and the marking is on the sidewall that tells how many times they have to go. But then this is probably an april fools joke.......
John
Reply to
John
John wrote in article ...
Interestingly, yet another example of the ineffectiveness of our environmental laws.
Forcing them out of service in the US did absolutely zilch for world pollution since it was simply moved elsewhere. But, US corporations face even MORE stringent environmental restrictions and costs.
Is it any wonder they are picking up their machinery and moving to places like China and India - the restrictive laws - yet again - accomplishing nothing towards the elimination of world pollution?
Reply to
*
snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) >
Can you buy a tooling from Taiwan, Korea, or Japan etc. is realy make in that country/area?
I say no, maybe 80% chance make in China.
Hope you good luck.
Reply to
Leo
At the end of the day, the serial numbers and part numbers matching up were the crux. Unless the guys with the warehouse were doing maintenance, repairs, overhauls,etc, to the parts it is possible that their name would not have been on the paperwork that related directly to the airworthiness of the parts (though I'm digging deep into what I was taught about air regs a long while back).
In a lot of fleets, esp the helos, there is generally a fair bit of horsetrading back and forth of the parts that one outfit has and the other needs. Trade in part lifed items is brisk. If the outfit was a warehouse and storage contractor, who's to know where the parts came from or what condition they were in, thus the requirement for the certs to follow the part to have any value. There would likely be a paper trail for the parts coming in, and from where, but that would be secondary to the records that belonged with the part itself IIRC.
Cheers Trevor Jones
Reply to
Trevor Jones
The paperwork for the part should show the status of the part. Is the part serviceable, overhauled, unairworthy but repairable, or scrap. It should also show who made the determination of the status of the part. If the part is serviceable or overhauled the paper work will show what CRS (certified repair station) did the inspection/repair/overhaul and when as well as the work order number/inspection report of the job. Some parts must have a record of time in service since new. The owner of the parts if they just owned them without having worked on them is not an important point.
John
Reply to
John

Site Timeline

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.