TIG brazing

Miller has a useful, short article on TIG brazing with silicon bronze up on their website:
http://tinyurl.com/y6xhcxa4
It's worth knowing about.
--
Ed Huntress

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On Tue, 09 Apr 2019 10:51:28 -0400, Ed Huntress

It has SO many applications. Brazing itself is a handy tool to have , as is Tig process - and combined they complement each other very well. The heat control of the TIG torch compared to a gas/oxy torch is beyond compare, and the gas lens of the tig torch, combined with the use of AC current, is more effective than a flux coated spelter in providing a clean consistent "weld"
Sweat brazing is perhaps easier with a gas torch, but fillet brazing is much easier with TIG
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I bought some silicon bronze welding rod for lathe turning stock. https://alcobrametals.com/guides/bronze "Silicon Bronze is a high-strength, highly corrosion resistant material with nonmagnetic properties. It is generally as strong as steel."
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On 4/9/2019 7:51 AM, Ed Huntress wrote: > Miller has a useful, short article on TIG brazing with silicon bronze > up on their website: > > http://tinyurl.com/y6xhcxa4 > > It's worth knowing about. >
If you are a YouTuber at all This Old Tony did a nice video on TIG brazing. Well pretty nice for a home gamer anyway.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jM2_LBvzg6c

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I just tig brazed a cracked swivel base on an old athol vise that was cracked badly used alum bronze. Rod flows really well on cast iron preheated and used a pretty long arc and a sharp tungsten 100 amps max with a pedal AC with the ac balance maxed out. Used alum cause Jody at welding tips said it shrinks less. Did seem to pull quite a bit but short beads and cooled in a bucket of sand overnite.
Larry Fisk in Idaho Hi Leon
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Has anyone measured how hot they could preheat a chunk of cast iron on a propane or charcoal barbecue?
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Jim Wilkins wrote:

If it's an all steel BBQ you can get up to around 500 with big burners and high flow gas. I've tossed an exhaust manifold in the fire of the shop stove before and got it cherry red and then welded it with nickel rod. Tossed it back in and let the fire die out, came back the next day and the weld was good. Had to surface the mounting flange because it did move a smidgen. A thick gasket would have covered it but I wanted copper sheet.
--
Steve W.

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On Wed, 10 Apr 2019 22:34:31 -0600

Jody has some really good TIG brazing videos. Another guy I watch is on instagram, icweld. Usually it is heavy duty 7018 stick stuff but he has some interesting cast brazing too. Here is a manifold repair:
https://www.instagram.com/p/BhM6vPml2v2/ https://www.instagram.com/p/BhM6Ziel_rX/
and this one started out as a stick repair but he ended up torch brazing it after cracking trouble:
https://www.instagram.com/p/BLRLOhuBIPp/ https://www.instagram.com/p/BLRQiTcBMnm/ https://www.instagram.com/p/BLRgLw3h-Za/ https://www.instagram.com/p/BLRpveUhAP7/ https://www.instagram.com/p/BLR1KS4hgkV/ https://www.instagram.com/p/BLSea7nh7YT/ https://www.instagram.com/p/BLSlqYgBhLL/ https://www.instagram.com/p/BLTe571BES7/
I like how he used a portable heater to warm up the casting beforehand. Didn't work out this time but something that maybe helpful to try someday ...
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI
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wrote:

For manifold repair Braze is often insufficient due to operating temperatures. I like to pre-heat then tig with stainless steel wire. Drilling a small hole at the end of the crack if not cracked through helps keep the crack from running away on you as you chase it with the weld - - - - -

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On Thu, 11 Apr 2019 14:37:49 -0400
<snip>

Yeah, I haven't had to try repairing one but what you mention concerning the heat produced in a working manifold has crossed my mind.
I welded a small cast part for my neighbor with Forney Noma-Cast rod. Looked like crap but held together for a couple years. He sold it recently, so I don't have to worry about re-welding it again :)
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Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI
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wrote:

I brazed - and then rebrazed, several Chrysler slant six exhaust manifolds in my younger years - never successfully - on my 63 Valiant 170. To be fair, the little critter wasn't technically stock, putting out 206HP to the rear wheals through it's unmodified torqueflyte 3 speedautomatic (at 6500RPM) so the exhaust temperature was possibly a bit higher than normal -
I have also had several manifolds repaired by tigging with stainless - and have not had any of the repairs fail.
I have repaired a lot of exhaust PIPES with brazing as well - and only repairs farther back than about 3 feet from the manifold have proven reliable
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On Thu, 11 Apr 2019 16:14:05 -0400
<snip>

Thanks for the heads up. Unless there isn't another way or I know for sure that the manifold runs cool (unlikely), I'll steer clear of a brazing repair for such :)
A TIG would be really nice but I can't quite justify buying one at this point in my life...
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Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI
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wrote:

Me either but 2 good friends have them available for me.
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On 4/11/2019 1:14 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:

WE bought new a 1963 valiant 170. Great engine and transmission. The rest was a real POS! Dealer never could get the water leaks into the trunk fixed. We gave up. Wife did a 180 on a wet highway during a panic stop. Door windows fell down into the doors because the keepers on the pins were made of card board! Discovered the 180 cause when I changed the brake shoes. Ones on one side of the car were 1/2 wider than the other side! Happy to get rid of it!
Paul
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wrote:

Perhaps the Canadian built Valiants were better than the Americans. I had mine up untill the '71 models came out, when I replaced it with a '69 Dart. Other than the rust issues that were typical of the period, regardless of manufacturer it was fine (other than it being NASTY to change points on, and the propensity for the exhaust manifold to crack) I had a bit of trouble getting points that didn't float at 6500RPM, and getting the plug heat range right so plugs didn't burn off in under 3000 miles, but neither of those were the manufacturer's fault. That little devil would GO!!!!!
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