Tool Post Home Made

Ok... I am not thrilled with the tool post on the 8.5 x 18, but I like the
lathe, It's a lot better than the mini lathe. I bought a quick change tool
post for the mini lathe and its ok, but I was thinking about making my own
tool post and holders for the 8.5 x 18. One thing that has me thinking that
way is the tool post on the 8.5 has one feature I like. It has a
cylindrical register on the base to match a pocket in the compound. This
makes for very smooth consistent tool positioning. I think I have most of
the mechanics of machining it figured out. I can do it on the RF-30
manually probably the fastest, and turn the register on the lathe. I'm just
wondering about the base material to make it out of. I see myself abusing
this tool post and just don't think aluminum is going to last worth a darn.
Cast iron? Some alloy of tool steel? I think I'll hold off on any exotics
like titanium until the Hurco mill is finished. LOL.
The other think I considered was buying a QCTP a little bigger than would
normally be on that size machine and modifying it to fit.
Reply to
Bob La Londe
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Unless you're a serious abuser, make it out of any free-machining steel you have on hand. No other steel will be stiffer, and if strength becomes an issue, you need to re-design the tool post. Anything rigid enough to work won't begin to approach the limits of strength for any grade of steel.
Commercially, such things are made of harder steel, to keep the ham-fisted from stripping out clamping-screw threads, etc.
Reply to
Ed Huntress
=A0I think I have most of
Look in the drop box. Stevenson put in a design for a tool post that is good.
I would make one out of something like 4340.
Dan
Reply to
dcaster
Any ideas what file names to look for?

Reply to
Bob La Londe
Just by searching for Steven's Tool Post I found this interesting page documenting somebody making one from his plans:
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I already like this guy and I haven't even gotten tot eh meat of the page: "By admitting to my errors, I hope other beginners will take heart, and recognize their own mistakes for the education they represent."
Reply to
Bob La Londe
Have to say I like the Stevenson design. Using the draw back wedge it should force the tool holder forward against the leading edge of the tool holder block slot for consistent depth to center. I wondered about the through boring until I looked at the two wedges. I guess I better square up the vise on the RF-30. Think I may go with some O1 tool steel for this.

Reply to
Bob La Londe
I'd suggest A36 instead.
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No real mechanical advantage in using something like that and purchasing alloy steel would probably cost nearly twice as much...
Reply to
PrecisionmachinisT
Have you looked at the HF version?
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=== Quick Change Tool Post Set for Mini Lathe Item # 42806 Manufacturer: Central Machinery Only:$99.99
Description:
Speed up your mini-lathe operations and enjoy the convenience of easy tool setup with this quick-change tool set. Tool posts feature dovetail-type locking system. -5 tool holders : turning, knurling/turning, parting tool, boring bar and boring/turning holders -3/8" capacity drill chuck with mandrel and chuck key -3 hex wrenches and knurl set
Shipping Weight: 6.10 lbs. ===
Read the comments at HF first. Some people had trouble making it fit their mini-lathes.
I like the idea of making your own though :)
Reply to
Leon Fisk
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Made from aluminum or steel?
Paul
Reply to
Paul Drahn
Summerville Steel in Tukwila used to sell alloy steel drops and cutoffs for 40 cents a lb. May still do that.
=20 Dan
Reply to
dcaster
Does he live someplace near Tukwila ?
Reply to
PrecisionmachinisT
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there is a very nicely made miniature Aloris clone, very tiny, at little machine shop dot com
Reply to
Bill
I do not think so, but I think you do.
Dan
Reply to
dcaster
=A0 =A0 =A0 =A0Dan
Tools4cheap.net has a nice clone also, similar to Phase II, import, but decent quality,
Nelson
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Reply to
Nelson Timken

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