Unknown thread standard (italian coffee machine)

Hello everyone!
I restore vintage espresso machines and right now I have one machine
with really strange threads, which are used on pipe connections. The
machine was manufactured in Italy in the 50s. Here are some examples:
TPI 20 diameter 14.9mm = 0.5866"
TPI 20 diameter 19.25mm = 0.7578"
TPI 16 diameter 20.25mm = 0.7972"
TPI 16 diameter 22.8mm = 0.8976"
TPI 16 diameter 27.7mm = 1.0905"
Does anyone know what kind of threads it might be?
Many thanks,
Julius
Reply to
Nicht die Bohne
Loading thread data ...
It's "IBT" standard. (Italian Bastard Thread)
Reply to
Buerste
"Buerste" fired this volley in news:zSj7m.16491 $ snipped-for-privacy@nlpi069.nbdc.sbc.com:
Yeah... they used that standard on Fiats until the late 1990s.
Then they changed everyting over to Quasi-Metric Standard Hungarian Industrial Threads. (Quasi-metric S.H.I.T.)
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
I have a table originally compiled by Andy Pugh that covers about 520 standard threads in the following thread systems and did not get a hit. Good luck!!:
BA = British association. CEI = Cycle Engineers Institute. ADM = Admiralty. M = ISO Metric. Whit = Whitworth. UNF/UNC = Unified national Fine/Coarse. BSF = British Standard Fine. W.INS = Whitworth Instrument. W.Pipe = Whitworth Pipe Thread Brass = Brass thread. PROG = Progress Thread. BSP = British Standard Pipe Thread. WALTH = Waltham Thread PEND = Watch Pendant Thread. GAS = Gas (Brass Pipe) Thread THURY = Swiss Screw Thread. ASME = ASME Thread. HOLTZ= Holtzapfels Threads. LOEW = Loewenhertz Threads. SPARK = Spark Plug Threads. Elgin = Elgin watch screw threads (L = left hand thread) CROWN = Watch crown threads. BUTTON = Watch button threads COND = Steel conduit thread (DIN 40430)
Buerste wrote:
Reply to
RoyJ
That means it might be a custom made thread? Thanks for your research Lloyd!! I also have already checked several websites with thread standards and couldn't find anything. But your table seems to include even more standards.
Julius
Reply to
Nicht die Bohne
That means it might be a custom made thread? Thanks for your research Roy!! I also have already checked several websites with thread standards and couldn't find anything. But your table seems to include even more standards.
Julius
Reply to
Nicht die Bohne
--Dollars to donuts some one guy was crankin' out these machines in a shop with a weird lathe and weird feed ratios.
Reply to
steamer
======== While this may not be *THE* answer, it is "A" answer.
During the time period immediatly after WW2 many surplus INCH standard lathes were sent overseas as part of the post-war reconstruction effort.
In many cases the parts these produced were bastard metric/inch as you describe with inch threads but metric diameters/lengths/thread forms, with the inch thread selected as close as possible to the metric size.
Unka' George [George McDuffee] ------------------------------------------- He that will not apply new remedies, must expect new evils: for Time is the greatest innovator: and if Time, of course, alter things to the worse, and wisdom and counsel shall not alter them to the better, what shall be the end?
Francis Bacon (1561-1626), English philosopher, essayist, statesman. Essays, "Of Innovations" (1597-1625).
Reply to
F. George McDuffee
Yes. Consider BA - used by the Brits for years but actually metric!
Reply to
N Morrison
Hand-chased by some guy on a treadle lathe? You don't NEED dies or taps to cut threads, they do help to make interchangeable parts, though. If it's got that hand-made, one-off look, it might have been done that way.
Stan
Reply to
stans4
In , on Wed, 15 Jul 2009 02:09:19 -0700 (PDT), Nicht die Bohne, snipped-for-privacy@googlemail.com wrote:
BSPP is fairly common in espresso machines. I imagine you've already checked that? (Sorry, I don't have my Machinery's Handbook at hand)
Reply to
Steve Ackman

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