Vertical Mill - $300 Craigslist

On 2012-02-20, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote:


Yes. And later I bought one more board to have 8 axes.

By adding one more board. It was actually straightforward, just buy a board and plug it into the motherboard. However, my parallel port could not keep up, which took a while to diagnose with Jon's help, and I bought a different parallel port card. They are not created equal, as it turns out.
i
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When I was using the printer port for general purpose I/O I found that its motherboard hardware registers have a one microsecond response time to keep the data rate on the cable within spec limits, even though the rest of the address space may respond in a few nanoseconds. I didn't check expansion cards.
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    [ ... ]

    A "ham" who can't make up cables?

    They are still pretty good here, though they are getting smaller every year. :-( Aside from all kinds of computer supplies, and intersting power supplies, I have also gotten some nice three-phase motors, a device for sliding an indicator vertically (resting on a surface plate) to carry a dial indicator to test a surface for vertical, a fixture for holding a screw and some thread pitch wires to measure the thread pitch against gauge blocks, a piece of test gear to compare current to voltage phase to tell you power factor -- or to compare two phases in a three-phase power feed and verify the phase angle, micrometers, digital calipers, a nice 24" Scherr-Tumico 24" vernier caliper, bags of 1000+ screws of some convenient size, red mushroom headed panic switches, controllers for a heat treating oven, and lots of other stuff. This is not counting all the IDC ribbon cable connectors, the bench-mount tool for crimping them, and the ribbon cable (including shielded 50-conductor ribbon cable). (Oh yes -- and last year, a nice Pace soldering/desoldering station with digital readout for temperature for each iron.)

    It could have, except:
1)    All voltages measured within spec -- at the backplane.
2)    I swapped in a nice switching mode power supply with no change     in behavior.
    [ ... ]

    That is what matters, after all. :-)

    Again -- I would have to make the double-D broach to make them from scratch, without the old hubs to swap in.

    Of course, I get similar things at hamfests. Also, last year, I got a tube of IGFETs of rather impressive current and voltage rating, at yet another hamfest. (Also a nice source for my preferred computers, Sun workstations and servers using UltraSPARC CPUs. :-)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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"DoN. Nichols" wrote:

That isn't uncommon in mid Florida. or do the simpleist repairs on their equipment. :(

There are a lot of gears & other metal parts needed to repair HP & Tektronix that are NLA. It could make a good side business for someone with better & more tools than I have right now.

I left Ohio in the mid 80s and made many trips to the Dayton Hamfest prior to that. It was great, till the last couple years. The motto was, 'If you can't find it at Dayton, you can't find it anywhere!'
The only Sun computer I have, came from a dumpster. A dead Ultra 10. A lot of bad electrolytics on the motherboard. It's still sitting out in themain shop, waiting for me to be able to clear off the bench & repair it.
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    [ ... hamfests ... ]

    [ ... ]

    Something to consider. Depends on how the making of the double-D broach goes.
    Intersting that of the gears in that Tek plugin, the one that failed was a plain spur gear, and most of the others (which are still available) were either bevel gears, or combination bevel and spur gears. The only still available spur gear is the long one.
    [ ... ]

    I've always wanted to go there, but never made it.

    O.K. The Ultra-10 is one of two which are of the level of construction of a fairly good PC. (The Ultra-5 is horizontal, the Ultra-10 is vertical (tower) format, and both use the same system (mother) board. One difference is that the Ultra-10 has room for the fancy Sun UPA graphics cards (like the Creator-3D) and the Ultra-5 does not. Both use IDE disk drives -- up to 120 GB IIRC, thanks to a limit in the controller chip that they used.
    A *lot* of bad electrolytics suggests that it was during the time of the pirated electrolyte formula.
    If you want to see what the high-end Sun workstations look like, take a look in a Sun Blade 2000 (or a 1000 for that matter.) The Ultra-60 is also really good, but not as fast. For about the speed of the top end of the Ultra-10 line (they came with several different CPU speeds), but a 1U rack mount chassis, and only one PCI slot.) These are the Sunfire-V120 machines. Two internal SCA hard drives, a (usually) built-in CD-ROM or DVD-ROM reader.
    If you get into the Sun machines, this site will be useful. It is an online version of the last FEH (Field Engineer's Handbook), which used to be available in dead-tree format.
    <http://www.sunshack.org/data/sh/2.1.8/infoserver.central/data/syshbk/index.html
Scroll down to the EOL systems, and click on the Ultra-10 to find out lots of details about the system and what it can work with. (Note, you won't find schematics of *any* of the machines anywhere.) :-(
    Go visit the Sun Blade 2000, and click on the side view to see what a really nice tower system looks like. The Sun Blade 1000/2000 use the same system board and CPUS as the Sun Fire 280R (another rack mount system). All of these systems use (by default) Fibre Channel drives, and you can hand up to 125 drives on one controller.
    You will find the V120 under "entry level servers". It has, aside from the two internal SCA disk drives, an external UltraSCSI connector, *two* built-in 100BaseT ethernet ports, a general serial port and one which is also the LOM (Lights Out Management) one which allows you to talk to the system, power it down, and reboot it from whatever distance is comfortable. It also has two USB ports. You normally only talk to it through the LOM port, when it boots, it switches that port to talk to the OS instead of the LOM hardware -- unless you type a '#' followed by a '.'.
    Since it is made to co-exist with many others (I have six taking up a small part of a relay rack here) it has aside from a green power LED, also an orange "Fault" LED -- both on the front and the back. You can turn the fault off and on from the LOM.
    You used to be able to download Solaris 10 from Sun for free, as long as you did not want to have support. Since Oracle took over, things are a bit tighter, but it looks like I can get Solaris 11 from OpenSolaris (which is owned by Oracle).
    You can install a framebuffer (Unix name for a graphics card) in the one PCI slot, and plug in a keyboard, and it acts like a workstation. Or -- you can plug in a PCI card which will host one, two or four more UltraSCSI slots and turn it into a server with up to 62 disks (counting the two built-in).
    There are two flavors of V120. One with a power line provided power (standard AC cord), or one with two DC connectors, intended to be used by the telephone company, and powered from the giant batteries that they run from.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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"DoN. Nichols" wrote:

I know the owner of one cal lab, and a guy that buys and resells test equipment with an industriaal building full. I'll give you their information if you are able to make the parts.

It was about an hour from my house, but even then I couldn't go every year.

Thanks. I've only seen two Sun computers in this area, but who knows what will turn up? :)
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    The only one that I currently *know* that I can make is that gear at the switch end, and so far I need the old hub to mount it on.
    I *know* that I can't make the bevel gears, or the mixed bevel/spur gears which are in that assembly. Those really need to be cast/molded.
    I should be able to make the long spur gear, but is is highly unlikey to fail in my opinion.
    [ ... ]

    At a half hour, I would not be able to resist. :-) However, from Northern VA, it is a bit far, especially back when I was expected at work after the weekend. :-)
    [ ... ]

    While I have ten of them of various ages running in this room alone. :-)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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"DoN. Nichols" wrote:

There are some simple flat gears, like used in their signal generators to drive the variable capacitors. someone on the antique radio newsgroup is looking for a gear for the HP 606.

That week was always vacation time. :)

I only have eight computers in my bedroom right now. The rest are off, to keep from having to run the A/C today. They can make this 10' * 10' room quite warm. It is supposed to be a child's bedroom, but it is right newt to the bathroom, and I am very uusteady when i first wake up, so the larger bedrooms are used for storage. :(
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    [ ... ]

    Hmm ... probably I would have to purchase more gear cutters. They tend to be rather expensive these days, and I had to purchase one for the Tek gears. 32 DP, 20 degree PA of the proper size for a 20 tooth gear. This can add up if I have to keep buying those.
    [ ... ]

    I couldn't afford to take that as vacation. I never had that much saved up at a time. :-)

    This is a larger room, of course, and in practice is our living room. :-)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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"DoN. Nichols" wrote:

Only you could decide if it was worth it, but I would think they would be a lot of similar gears that would use the same tooling. They built whiole series of equipment on similar chassis, after all. You could look at some of the manuals on the Agilent website to get an idea what they look like, if you're really interested. Agileent is the name of the former HP test equipment division, for those who don't know. The site is broken into chemical and test equipment.

I only had a week or two each year, and I made it a condition of emplyment that I could get that week off, every year.

That's where I work on computers, when I feel well enough.
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    The photos/drawings would show me what they *look* like, but they likely would not show the diametric pitch nor the pressure angle. (And they might be "module" (metric) gears as well.)
    As for the manual for the Tek plugin, it only showed the assembly with the gears as an outline drawing of gearbox (covered), Veeder-Root counter, switch and 10-turn pot as a complete assembly. No drawing of what the gears even looked like under the covers.
    And yes, I know that Aligent took over the HP test equipment line.

    I worked for a US Army R&D lab, and they did not accept such conditions -- especially since I did not even know about that hamfest when I hired on with them. :-)
    I considered that I was enough ahead of the game vs the GIs in that if the rules got to be too much of a problem, I could quit and go to work for industry instead. That made enough difference so I stuck it out until retirement. :-)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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"DoN. Nichols" wrote:

I know that. What I meant was that you could see what styles you could do.

At one time Tektronix would provide engineering drawings for obsolete parts. There was a guy in Orlando making HV transformers for the tube & hybrid scopes about 15 years ago. He requested the drawings and suppliers for the core & bobbins and built a winding machine.

That wasn't aimed at you. It was for someone who might be lurking, or who might stumble across the tread later on. :)

I worked for mostly small companies back then, and one place the owner was a ham so he knew the reasons. :)

I stuck out the US Army till my commitment ended. :)
I did turn down a civil service job in LA (Lower Alabama) that was offered while I was stationed there.
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    [ ... ]

    You know -- with the plastic gears, I think that would be a job for someone with one of those 3-D printers. If the resolution is good enough, they could even make the two-part bevel/spur gear, which I could not with my equipment.

    Hmm ... that would have been nice -- but I did not know that it was a possibility, so I just plunged ahead with what I could make. :-)

    O.K. Good thinking.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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"DoN. Nichols" wrote:

Would they have thr required strength? There are some people on the antique radio newsgroup molding replacment grommets & knobs. Some had molded replacment plastic gears by making two impressions and replacing the damaged section in one mold.

Hopefully, you won't need another. :)

Take care. :)
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    [ ... ]

    I really don't know. I suspect that it depends on what plastic is is capable of using. I have heard recently a mention (no URLs, sorry) of some using carbon filament as the plastic.
    I personally would not have thought that the plastic which Tektronix used for that gear was strong enough to start with.
    And given that I have looked at others of the same model of plugin at hamfests, and told by the feel of the coarse knob that the same gear was broken on those, that there was a pattern of failures.
    And a later model with the same plugin number replaced the Veeder-Root readout with a LED numeric readout.

    Unless someone gives me another failed plugin at a hamfest. :-)
    Hamfest tomorrow. Not a very big one these days, but it is fairly close. :-)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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"DoN. Nichols" wrote:

I think it was degraded ofver the years from heat and chemicals. I've had some knobs crumble in my hands, while others that were used less often were fine

Probably when it was cheaper to build than the mecanical version. :)

Don't buy too many white elephants, unless you have plenty of gray paint on hand. ;-)
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    [ ... ]

    Coming back to answer one other part after sending off the main answer.
    I remember at least one product which I could not make the mechanical parts for with my current equipment. This was an audio oscillator -- little modular one, not to be confused with the old tube-driven ones which took up four times the volume. The dial was coupled to a pot by a pair of spirals with dial cord wrapped around and under tension in both directions, so you got a linear scale on the frequency. dial
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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"DoN. Nichols" wrote:

They use DDS these days. You program the frequency, wave shape & output level into a tiny IC. Analog Devices make several of the DDS ICs. You can buy a complete demo board on Ebay for under $10, and drive it from the parallel port on a Windows computer with a couple 74HCT574 ICs.
Wavetek was really bad for mechanical designs, and always had too much backlash for the work I did. I had the HP 3325B digital function generator, while everyone else in test had Waveteks. :)
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01:27:45 -0500 typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

    As a friend says "If you have to turn up the heat, you're not using enough computers."

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pyotr filipivich wrote:

Then he doesn't live in Central Florida. :)
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