what is a fender washer?

what is a fender washer? in which situation is it used?
Reply to
alanh_27
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A fender washer has a larger than normal outside diameter for the size of the center hole. The purpose is to cover the slotted adjustment holes normally found in some fenders and body panels.
Reply to
John Kunkel
Dear alanh_27:
Just to add a little to John Kunkel's response... They also help distribute loading, when the bolted joint is into/includes sheet metal. Serves to stiffen up the bolted area.
David A. Smith
Reply to
N:dlzc D:aol T:com (dlzc)
"N:dlzc D:aol T:com (dlzc)" wrote in message news:rZWDd.23751$CH5.11854@fed1read01... | Dear alanh_27: |
| > what is a fender washer? in which situation is it used? | | Just to add a little to John Kunkel's response... | They also help distribute loading, when the bolted joint is into/includes | sheet metal. Serves to stiffen up the bolted area. | | David A. Smith
Sort of. Usually not very strong, so they tend to sink a lot if you torque them down to a reasonable amount. I've brazed a smaller washer on top of a fender washer to stiffen one up, just stacking them only goes so far. Actually, I needed it to remove and replace some bearings from the front axle of my 4x4 truck. Had a 5/8" allthread going the length of the axle and you couldn't get washers the right diameter with a 5/8" hole in it. Lots of wrenching going on that day!
Reply to
carl mciver
A little guy name Jose' who works down at my local car wash. He's not tall enough to wash the top of the car, just the fenders.
carl mciver wrote:
Reply to
tes
OK, so what's the etemology?
Did they hold fenders on, or fend off denting?
Jeff
Reply to
Jeff Wisnia
STOP THE CROSS POSTING PLEASE, THIS IS A WOOD TURNING SITE !!!
Reply to
Leo Van Der Loo
wrote: A little guy name Jose' who works down at my local car wash. He's not tall enough to wash the top of the car, just the fenders. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ You can buy at your neighborhood electric guitar store parts department.
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
"Jeff Wisnia" wrote: OK, so what's the etemology? Did they hold fenders on, or fend off denting? ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ It's the same etymology, Jeff. Fenders on a car are so named because they fend off other cars, or possibly cows. Incidentally, in Britain, fenders really can fend off things--they are what Americans call "bumpers."
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
We call them 'penny washers' in the UK, because they are about the same size as an old penny.
Leon
Reply to
Leon Heller
Ah yes, and I'm old enough to remember when cars HAD bumpers, not the wussy things they still call bumpers which get scarred from their first kiss.
I also remember "bumper bolts"; Chromed carriage bolts which held the old chromed bumpers onto their brackets.
Jeff
Reply to
Jeff Wisnia
I can remember when Sunoco 260 cost .25 a gallon! John
Reply to
UltraJohn
On my 1950 Austin A-40, the "fenders" couldn't fend off much more than your average red squirrel. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
Reply to
Gerald Miller
That is what happened to all of those old Pennies!
Our 1/2" hole type are typically 2" or more.
Martin
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
I remember when I could put $5.00 worth of gas in my dads Tri Pacer and go fly for a couple of hours.
Jerry
Reply to
Jerry Springer
Pickups still have bumpers, Jeff.
Reply to
Don Foreman
When you can't afford to have the whole car washed?
Reply to
Don Foreman
Actually, those "wussy things" will take a higher speed impact without damage other than scratches than will the ones when cars HAD bumpers. The reason for the "wussy things" is that the government wasn't satisfied with the strength of the existing bumpers and required that they be made stronger--to do that they had to be made with some "give" which meant using flexible materials which meant scratches.
Personally I think it was a bad idea--the "wussy things" work fine up to their design speed but above that they cost a _lot_ more to fix than the old fashioned kind because the pieces that make them able to survive impacts at the required speed get broken and have to be replaced.
Reply to
J. Clarke
your data on bumpers is correct, but obsolete - the 5 mph bumper requirement was eliminated some time ago, and trust me, the new ones are beautiful, but not terribly effective (body shop bill for being smooshed between two cars on the freeway, I was stopped as was the car behind me) has crossed 10K and climbing - around half of that is for front and rear bumpers.
Reply to
william_b_noble
I can remember when you jacked up a car by the bumper. Nowdays hit a curb and its $800 in repairs
Gunner
"The French are a smallish, monkey-looking bunch and not dressed any better, on average, than the citizens of Baltimore. True, you can sit outside in Paris and drink little cups of coffee, but why this is more stylish than sitting inside and drinking large glasses of whiskey I don't know." -- P.J O'Rourke (1989) --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Reply to
Gunner

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