What is it? Set 260

I haven't had any luck in identifying the large metal ring in number 1473, maybe someone here will recognize it.

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Rob

Reply to
Rob H.
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Looks like a fan shroud.

Reply to
Morris Dovey

Looks more like a rotating rack for pots and pans to me .

Reply to
Terry Coombs

Nice set. Can't even guess at a couple, but that won't stop me from trying.

1471: It seems that something can fit inside the grooved ends, with the steel 'spring' locking it in place. At first, before I saw that it was one-sided, I thought maybe it held a pool cue or something, but now I think it might be made to be hung on the handle of a pail to make it easier to carry. The two-sided grooves means it can be attached by twisting it on, and the springs keeps the wooden piece from slipping down the handle, or falling off.

1472: Drive motor for an electric garage door opener. The slots are so that the slave gear can disconnect in case the door jams.

1473: Why do I instinctively think of a big bass drum in a marching band...? Or, if this is an electrician's truck, the ring around a gas station sign like this:
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1474: A novelty boot jack:

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1475: A hay bale lifter like on the front of this tractor, but midified to use in a barn:
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1476: A diamond cutting machine.

--riverman

Reply to
humunculus

1474 is a portable bootjack.
Reply to
Barbara Bailey

Quite a tricky set this time, at least for me. Wild guesses follow.

1471 - Seems to be some manner of marker that clips onto a cable or rope. Being made out of wood, it's unlikely to be used as a weight, and it doesn't look too safe to use as an electrical insulator. Maybe it's placed where two ropes cross to avoid chafing against each other?

(Maybe it's a demonstration model illustrating a form of the Chinese finger trap?)

1472 - A smallish electric motor with a short doubly-keyed lead screw attached. Possibly this formed a part of a benedix drive to engage the load only when the motor was energized, as for a starter motor for an engine. 1473 - My initial thought was that this was part of a spinning rack such as is sometimes used to keep track of order slips in diners. That doesn't seem to go with the other tools and materials in the truck, though. Maybe it's a part of a light fixture or other item these tradesmen happen to be working on? Maybe it's a collar to go around an open manhole to hang stuff down and give some visual warning that there's an open manhole? 1474 - Portable gun rest for target shooting?

1475 - The claws appear to clamp onto something to hold and move it, engaged or released by the lever with the worn-off orange paint. Probably, it's used to move bales of something; I'd suspect not hay, as hay bales lack the structure to be grabbed this way, but perhaps newspapers for recycling or something similar.

1476 - Possibly these turn (or, perhaps more correctly, spin) brass finials?

Now to see what others have to say.

Reply to
Andrew Erickson

1471 I am going to guess that this is a grip extension of some kind. My thoughts keep coming back to archery and that this would go on the bow but I'm not too sure about that. 1472 My first thought was that its a worm from a worm reduction gear but not sure now I have seen smaller versions of this setup that operate door locks. So maybe this would be for a high security vault? 1473 no idea apart from a connector for two bits of ducting. 1474 Again no idea my only thoughts would be an ornament. 1475 Hay bale grabber? 1476 I am guessing that these are for making watch gears.
Reply to
Dwayne

Well I don't know what item 1476 is but I have a mechanism here which looks very much like the major part of the third picture.

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I was going to clean it up and send in some pictures in the hope that someone might be able to identify it.

Reply to
Stuart

If I walk into a bank with #1474, I could get enough money to buy the rest of these gadgets.

#1475 is what you'll get if you get caught trying this stunt.

;-)

Reply to
Paul Hovnanian P.E.

1473: Maybe it's a way to carry 60 feet of welding cable. I imagine kinking it or winding it on a small radius would reduce its service life.
Reply to
E Z Peaces

I'd guess 1473 is an overhead rack for pots and pans, probably out of a restaurant or commercial kitchen.

I'd guess that #1476 are all wheel cutting engines for watch and clock making.

Reply to
woodworker88

Sure looks like whats left of the bottom of an overhead tool rack used in kitchens for line chefs, making soup to nuts...

Matt

Reply to
matthew maguire

woodworker88 wrote: ...

I agree the distant picture makes one think of that, but looking at the details more I decided not...it's got too many other attachment that wouldn't work well for the purpose. I think it is a connecting piece between other ducting or similar as another proposed earlier...

--

Reply to
dpb

1467 Same trade Rob, but not the same purpose!

Top is a wheel cutting engine

Middle looks like an uprighting tool

Bottom is a watchmakers lathe, fitted with a "mandrel" face plate. The Lathe looks English, probably a Lorch.

All are watcmakers/clockmakers tools.

Steve R.

Reply to
Steve R.

Posting from rec.crafts.metalworking as always.

1471) Hmm ... looks like a sliding clip to go on something like clothesline. Looks like wood and spring steel.

1472) Well ... an ACME thread on the motor shaft, but too close to the metal shield for normal use, so I think that it is some form of feed device.

Looks as though the threads were turned as an afterthought, and that it was originally to drive a pulley or something similar with a double keyway.

1473) For winding the hoses shown on smaller reels to the left? Those hoses look to be for oxygen and some fuel gas.

It looks way too flimsy to be caging the tire while seating the bead to prevent explosions.

1474) A child's toy with a hidden compartment?

1475) A hay bale grapple?

1476) Decorative metal turning engines -- for engraving regular decorative patterns into metal?

Holtzapfel (sp?) made the fanciest one that I have heard of, and these are far below that.

Now to see what others have said.

Enjoy, DoN.

Reply to
DoN. Nichols

Uh-h, I think I see the welding cables hanging behind the driver's mirror. I'd say the owner isn't very concerned about wear and tear.

All those holes make me think the length can be adjusted.

Is the truck used to repair farm equipment in the field? How do you seat the bead of a tubeless tire in the field? I've seated beads with a limited air supply by tightening a rope around the tire to push the beads out to slow the escape of air.

I think this band was a closed hoop only for traveling. To use it, you would make it slightly shorter than the circumference of the tire. You would put it in place with a gap between the ends, put one or more nylon straps around it, and tighten them with ratchets. The hooks extending from the band would keep the strap or straps from sliding off the tire.

When this squeezed the beads out against the rim, you would apply air until the air held the beads out. While tire pressure was still low, you would loosen and remove the straps.

Reply to
E Z Peaces

Good point, I had meant that they were all used for making one particular device.

According to the museum in which I found these, they were not used to make clocks or watches. Although the craftsman who used them was also a clockmaker, the devices on my site were described as being used in a different trade. So perhaps these are clockmaker's tools that were used in another trade, or maybe he modified some of his clockmaker's tools for making other devices.

Rob

Reply to
Rob H.

Or this?

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Kinda sorta?

--riverman

Reply to
humunculus

Or this?

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Kinda sorta?

--riverman

Yes, kinda sorta, not sure why it would have handles around the outside though. Here is a larger photo of the truck with its contents, you can click on it to make it bigger:

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Reply to
Rob H.

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