What is it? Set 260

wrote:

Quite a tricky set this time, at least for me. Wild guesses follow.
1471 - Seems to be some manner of marker that clips onto a cable or rope. Being made out of wood, it's unlikely to be used as a weight, and it doesn't look too safe to use as an electrical insulator. Maybe it's placed where two ropes cross to avoid chafing against each other?
(Maybe it's a demonstration model illustrating a form of the Chinese finger trap?)
1472 - A smallish electric motor with a short doubly-keyed lead screw attached. Possibly this formed a part of a benedix drive to engage the load only when the motor was energized, as for a starter motor for an engine.
1473 - My initial thought was that this was part of a spinning rack such as is sometimes used to keep track of order slips in diners. That doesn't seem to go with the other tools and materials in the truck, though. Maybe it's a part of a light fixture or other item these tradesmen happen to be working on? Maybe it's a collar to go around an open manhole to hang stuff down and give some visual warning that there's an open manhole?
1474 - Portable gun rest for target shooting?
1475 - The claws appear to clamp onto something to hold and move it, engaged or released by the lever with the worn-off orange paint. Probably, it's used to move bales of something; I'd suspect not hay, as hay bales lack the structure to be grabbed this way, but perhaps newspapers for recycling or something similar.
1476 - Possibly these turn (or, perhaps more correctly, spin) brass finials?
Now to see what others have to say.
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Andrew Erickson

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1475 is a hale bale hook.
Rob H. wrote:

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1471 I am going to guess that this is a grip extension of some kind. My thoughts keep coming back to archery and that this would go on the bow but I'm not too sure about that. 1472 My first thought was that its a worm from a worm reduction gear but not sure now I have seen smaller versions of this setup that operate door locks. So maybe this would be for a high security vault? 1473 no idea apart from a connector for two bits of ducting. 1474 Again no idea my only thoughts would be an ornament. 1475 Hay bale grabber? 1476 I am guessing that these are for making watch gears.
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Well I don't know what item 1476 is but I have a mechanism here which looks very much like the major part of the third picture.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v80/harnett65/Album%209/pic1476d.jpg
I was going to clean it up and send in some pictures in the hope that someone might be able to identify it.
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If I walk into a bank with #1474, I could get enough money to buy the rest of these gadgets.
#1475 is what you'll get if you get caught trying this stunt.
;-)
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Paul Hovnanian snipped-for-privacy@hovnanian.com
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Rob H. wrote:

1473: Maybe it's a way to carry 60 feet of welding cable. I imagine kinking it or winding it on a small radius would reduce its service life.
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E Z Peaces wrote:

Uh-h, I think I see the welding cables hanging behind the driver's mirror. I'd say the owner isn't very concerned about wear and tear.
All those holes make me think the length can be adjusted.
Is the truck used to repair farm equipment in the field? How do you seat the bead of a tubeless tire in the field? I've seated beads with a limited air supply by tightening a rope around the tire to push the beads out to slow the escape of air.
I think this band was a closed hoop only for traveling. To use it, you would make it slightly shorter than the circumference of the tire. You would put it in place with a gap between the ends, put one or more nylon straps around it, and tighten them with ratchets. The hooks extending from the band would keep the strap or straps from sliding off the tire.
When this squeezed the beads out against the rim, you would apply air until the air held the beads out. While tire pressure was still low, you would loosen and remove the straps.
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E Z Peaces wrote:

Patent 4997020 is for a device where a metal band of several sections would be tightened around a truck tire to seat the bead. It says putting a strap around the tire was an established method, but this would result in asymmetrical pressure, due in part to friction between the strap and the rubber.
1473 could reduce friction in tightening a strap. The hooks could also be a means of compensating for asymmetrical pressure by exerting pull between hooks across the circle.
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I dunno...the patent device seems to be made of a series (at least 3) sections that can overlap, so tighening the device reduces the circumference. This thing seems pretty solid.
Some observations: the 'handles' are directly opposite that D-shaped stain on the opposite side. It might be the bottom, with the two handles on top at 10:00 and 2:00.
The truck seems to be a welder's truck....does this have anything to do with welding? If not, could it be something he is taking back to be repaired?
Around the rim of the ring are 7 'rods' that extend beyond the ring. Are the ends of these rods bent outward, or are there little 'knobs' at the top? And between each rod are 5 small angled things, that look like they could be used to secure a flat plate on to the ring.
Hmm....I love a mystery, but less so when I know it might never be answered.
--riverman
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humunculus wrote:

The thing that's bugging me is that I feel like I've seen one of those damn things somewhere and I have no idea where it was.
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Exactly! Hmmm....
--riverman
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humunculus wrote:

I think it's a belt rack out of a clothing store
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Wild guess here - Could it have anything to do with pipeline work? I see a lot of trucks like this in the East Texas area, several right here in the RV park we stay in, and these guys are doing gas/oil pipeliune construction. Still don't know what that big ring is for, but just thought I might throw in an alternative employment for the vehicle.
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Nahmie wrote:

The welder in the front is sometimes called a pipeliner.
John
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Show this picture to one of the guys with a truck like this, and ask him what the ring is for!
--riverman
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Senior moment . . . haven't seen any welders here this month. Had about 6 of them last winter. Norm
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humunculus wrote:

It's not that patented device, but the patent describes the obstacles to seating a bead by squeezing the circumference.

I wonder how many there are. I now think the handles and not the hooks keep a strap from sliding off the tire. The strap would be threaded under the handles. Using metal band between the strap and the tire overcomes one of the obstacles mentioned in the patent: friction.

Would the tire be his spare? Isn't a spare normally carried somewhere other than the middle of the cargo space?

The metal band would allow a strap to slide fairly freely as it squeezed the circumference. According to the patent, there are other factors that make a squeeze asymmetrical. Suppose you tighten the strap and see that the bead is not sliding into place at some spots. What now?
Imagine you reach for a sort of load binder with a few links of chain on each end. If you hook the chains to two of those hooked rods and pull the lever, that should deform the circumference. I think that could be used to manipulate the bead into place.
I think what look like "small angled things" are holes, allowing the mechanic to mount as many hooked rods as he wants at the spacing he chooses.
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Sounds like a good possibility, but I'm not yet ready to pronounce this one as solved. I'm thinking that in the next couple weeks someone will recognize it and provide a definitive answer.
Rob
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I'd guess 1473 is an overhead rack for pots and pans, probably out of a restaurant or commercial kitchen.
I'd guess that #1476 are all wheel cutting engines for watch and clock making.
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woodworker88 wrote: ...

I agree the distant picture makes one think of that, but looking at the details more I decided not...it's got too many other attachment that wouldn't work well for the purpose. I think it is a connecting piece between other ducting or similar as another proposed earlier...
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