Large ring gear wanted

Looking for a starter ring gear, in the region of 23" to 25" OD, 24"
would be perfect. The gardner L2/LW ring is not quite big enough.
Maximum ID of 22 7/8"
Thanks
Tim
Reply to
Tim Leech
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Truck engine ring gears are out because the biggest flywheel housings used, are SAE #1, which has a 20-1/8" flyweel opening.
The next size up is a SAE #0 which would be found on industrial units has a flywheel opening of 25-1/2" which could mean a ring gear too big.
I have cut and welded ring gears to increase the diameter. The most critical part was the cutting to length. First cut two ring gears and roll them as close to the desired diameter as possible then cut a piece that was mathematically correct for the desired increase in diameter and weld it in. The subsequent heating & fitting takes care of any deficiencies in shape. I always scotch keyed them, though, just in case.
Another alternative is to roll & weld a ring, fit it and get your local gear hobber to hob it, it you make the bushing to fit the flywheel to the hobber, cost should be quite reasonable.
Tom
Reply to
Tom
Not quite true, as it's not always essential for the flywheel to pass through the SAE aperture. The Gardners I mentioned have a flywheel about 22 1/2" OD, and were available AFAIR with SAE1 housings.
Don't think my sheet metal hand rolls would take too kindly to that job
Interesting idea.
I don't think they would take to kindly to this one, the flywheel is 150 Kg. The only *local* outfit I know couldn't handle the diameter, never mind the weight.
I've worked out that it's practical for me to cut teeth myself with the wheel set up on my mill on a rotary table, with a B&S cutter. Tedious, but probably cheaper in the end than getting a one-off ring made and an interesting challenge.
Thanks Tim
Reply to
Tim Leech
Come on Tim, the last time Gardners were fitted in road vehicles, was last century and said vehicles were known as lorries, also the phrase: "not being able to pull the skin of a rice pudding comes to mind.." The double plate clutch has banished any need for large diameter flywheels on truck engines for decades..
As for the weight of the flywheel, on a hobber that would take that diameter, not a problem as they are designed to take a full complement of blank gears..
Tom
Reply to
Tom
Wagons round here. Better still, Waggons. None of these nasty American style 'Trucks' Actually they were still being fitted in PSV's until the mid/late 1980's at least.
Be that as it may, they were fitted with SAE1 housings , which was my point about the SAE size not being the limitation.
But I don't know of a firm in flywheel throwing distance which could take anything like that size.
Cheers Tim
Reply to
Tim Leech
Be that as it may Tim, I wondered amongst 200 odd truck engines this morning and lo, no flywheel measured over 20" and although there were no ubiquitous Gardners, albeit with too small a diameter, the engines were 50 odd to 500 hp.
Flywheel throwing distance? I understand that there are people that are not predisposed toward travel & social intercourse outside their village and I have met many, but surely just this once you could make a exception? :-) Think of your rotary table! I'm still shuddering! :-)
Tom
Reply to
Tom
Manufacturer's quoted capacity 200Kg. I checked!
Cheers Tim
Reply to
Tim Leech
I hope it wasn't made in Taiwan? Seen some of their "1-1/2 ton" rated garage jacks? :-)
Tom
Reply to
Tom
According to the makers plate it states "Made in England, shipped to NZ but returned as no one knows how to use it" -- Regards,
John Stevenson Nottingham, England.
Reply to
John Stevenson
"Made in England"? Definitely made last century then, it's a wonder it didn't end up in a museum! :-) Since acquiring a Haas 4th axis, knowledge of such arcane machinery is rather redundant.
Cheers Tom
Reply to
Tom
Nah, Spain. See
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I've had a brand new Taiwan 10 ton jack break up on me under load, vowed since then only to use screw jacks or Hydra-lites for lifting boats! Cheers Tim
Reply to
Tim Leech
30 all. Kiwi to serve :-) ttfn Roland
Reply to
Roland and Celia Craven
I don't think my Haas 4th axis would cope very well - 150Kg is a bit much for a 5C collet
Cheers Tim
Reply to
Tim Leech
Bit of a conundrum here, surely you're confusing mass with dimension?
However I do think a 12" Haas beats a 5c Haas...A fuller Haas? :-)
Cheers Tom
Reply to
Tom
OK, OK, if you want to be pedantic, 150 Kg is a bit much for a 5C collet *indexing head*
I had a girlfriend by the name of Deborah Haas, can't quite think how to make that relevant though She was quite tough but not very big, I think she would have struggled with 150 Kg, too!
Cheers Tim
Reply to
Tim Leech
It did. The Tim Leech, Dutton Dock {TM} museum.
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Tom, Here's the conundrum, seeing as Haas is American and the yanks are very, very well know for boasting. You know things like never having a ground floor and calling it the first floor so they can brag their buildings are bigger, adding an extra nought to billions so it looks like they have more, using short tons etc, etc,.
With machines they also do the same, lathe are always quoted in swing so that 6" Altas sounds a lot bigger that a UK 4-1/2" Boxford when in fact it looks like a tailstock chuck compared to it.
So is your 12" Haas really a 6" centre hight when the yank terminology is washed off ??
Other problem is that Tim will have a size problem using a 4th axis head unless it can be mounted vertical in which case it will add overall hight and loss of rigidity. You need a biggish machine to get 12"+ [ English 12" - not yank ]under a horizontal cutter with the part you are working on high and dry in fresh air. At least going horizontal you get the mass directly onto the bed and you can clamp the ring to the bed for increased rigidity as you cut each tooth.
-- Regards,
John Stevenson Nottingham, England.
Reply to
John Stevenson
Seeing as you hail from an area that "historically" awarded a prize for accuracy to an arrow that split another already in the target, I can see that the local denizens are still holding with the fudging tradition...:-) In the real world, a 5C collet, unless it is an extended nose, has a capacity of 1-1/16", that even using Notts archery regs, is just slightly more than a tad less capacity of a 12" 4th axis which has in reality, as I didn't know the Notts Archery Committee was sitting in, 12.22" when used in the horizontal axis. Furthermore, as both devices are of the same neo hispanic origin, any suggestion of esos yanquis de jactancia malditos, has to be negated? Just make sure that the maid is a hardworking lass! :-)
Tom The man in blue
Reply to
Tom
But of course
No no missed the point. Is the 12" Haas 12" centre hight or swing ?
Bloody hell Tom, what's the Falkland's got to do with it ? That's a long way from Sherwood Forest, if I remember right it's go west from Sherwood to Liverpool then turn left.
They all are Tom and buxom with it as well
-- Regards,
John Stevenson Nottingham, England.
Reply to
John Stevenson
Come, come, John, I wander off to the gym for a couple of hours and you're renamed the Falklands! Whaddya reckon the Argies' response will be?
Tom
Reply to
Tom

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