Welding teeth back on old Jeep flywheel ring gear?

A few teeth are worn and the starter won't engage at one small spot (of
course that's where the engine stops) on the ring gear of my 65 CJ5 plow
vehicle. Does anyone think I will be able the build up some weld and
grind some teeth that might work? I really don't want to pull the trans
and spinning the fan/crank when it's 20 below is not fun.
Thanks for your time
Larry Webb
Reply to
Larry Webb
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Take the flywheel bolts out and turn the flywheel cloclwise to the next bolt hole then the starter should not stop at the bad teeth....
I have done this when I was too poor to replace the gear on the flywheel. You will need to change the starter gear as it will have excessive wear on it also, but cheeper thatn the other gear..
C.
Reply to
C
It might work but you will be creating a lot of problems for yourself. The ring gear is often a separate ring shrunk onto the flywheel. It is a hardened ring. When you weld on it you might relieve the tension that holds the ring tight and it could slip of or fracture under high RPM's If you have a wire feed machine you might try small tack welds on the broken tooth. A nickel based welding rod or wire would reduce possible cracking. Limit your heat input allowing the tooth to cool after each tack. You could use a dremel tool or die grinder to shape the teeth. I really don't think this is a good repair if this is your primary vehicle. Randy
A few teeth are worn and the starter won't engage at one small spot (of course that's where the engine stops) on the ring gear of my 65 CJ5 plow vehicle. Does anyone think I will be able the build up some weld and grind some teeth that might work? I really don't want to pull the trans and spinning the fan/crank when it's 20 below is not fun.
Thanks for your time Larry Webb
Reply to
R. Zimmerman
You cant just push the vehicle forward or backward a little to engage the next good gear tooth ??
Reply to
Supersilious Salami
C wrote in article ...
Since most flywheel bolt patterns are "clocked", one of the bolt holes will not align unless it is in front of its own specific bolt hole.
If you rotate the flywheel in its relationship with the crankshaft, it is likely that one bolt hole on the flywheel and one bolt hole on the crankshaft flange will not be aligned - leaving you with only four of six cap screws holding the flywheel on.
Turning a flywheel out of phase will screw up the balance of the rotating assembly - which is determined with the flywheel in a certain position - which is why the bolt pattern is "clocked."
I've been around the automotive aftermarket for 40+ years, and I've never seen a flywheel that didn't need to be rotationally aligned with the crank - but, I do not profess to having seen everything there is to see.
Bob Paulin - R.A.C.E. Chassis Analysis Services
Reply to
Bob Paulin
I've done it to my Chevy Astro. I used a Certanium 707 rod. There is one point to take care when doing it, you have to clamp the ground to the ring gear itself, otherwise you might be damaging the crankshaft bearings it the current flow is not thought of.
As you were instructed above, you need to tack it for a half-second, turn around and whistle, just like the metal on ring wheel don't get an idea what you're doing with it.
A dremel tool works, initially you could use an angle grinder. A Certanium 707 is very hard, makes shaping a bit nerving, but after all, it is worth of doing (I had to weld upwards, makes it more enjoyable).
Matti R.
Reply to
Matti Rantanen
If you've got the four you'll actuall yfind that the teeth are worn in two spots 180 degrees apart.
As for pulling the transmission, on a jeep it's way easier to pull the engine after unbolting it from the tranny, the cross mount will hold the tranny & xfer case perfectly level with the engine out. It's only 10 minutes work to remove the fenders & front grill which makes getting the engine out a breeze, first time will take you an hour total, it gets a lot faster after that :).
Easiest way to repair the ring is- Don't.
Heat the ring until it expands enough to come loose from the flywheel, Rotate it 90 degrees, flip it front-to-back for good measure & put it back on the flywheel. Good for another 40 years.
While you have it apart this is a good time to fix all the little things that need doing.
Larry Webb ( snipped-for-privacy@removethisrovatune.com) wrote: : A few teeth are worn and the starter won't engage at one small spot (of : course that's where the engine stops) on the ring gear of my 65 CJ5 plow : vehicle. Does anyone think I will be able the build up some weld and : grind some teeth that might work? I really don't want to pull the trans : and spinning the fan/crank when it's 20 below is not fun.
: Thanks for your time : Larry Webb
-- Howard Eisenhauer on ************************************** * * Chebucto Community Network * Can't think of anything cute * Halifax Nova Scotia * to put in here * * * snipped-for-privacy@chebucto.ns.ca **************************************
Reply to
Howard Eisenhauer
Thanks for all the great input from everyone about my Jeep ring gear problem. I think (as Howard mentioned below) pulling the engine is the way to go. I've been plowing my driveway for 23 years with great machine, so I think I'll also replace the clutch before it let's loose during a big storm.
Larry
Howard Eisenhauer wrote:
Reply to
Larry Webb

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