What is it? Set 421

Just posted this week's set:

formatting link

Rob

Reply to
Rob H.
Loading thread data ...

2439. Peg for glass insulator on telephone pole. For the electric line of course.
Reply to
kfvorwerk

2437 - Looks an awful lot like one of the clamps used on our OLD stabilization tools. The serrated jaw clamps to whatever, then you use the open eye on the end to secure it using rope at an angle. 2438 - Darley Crash Axe.

2439 - Glass insulator mount (Patented in 1865 by Louis Cauvet) The pins are nice but the glass is worth money..

2440 - Nice parlor stove.

2441 -

2442 - old lever action hoist I think
Reply to
Steve W.

"Steve W." fired this volley in news:N1YKq.8830 $ snipped-for-privacy@newsfe11.iad:

It looks like it might be Dutch from late 1700s-early 1800s, if I recognise the type of designs.

The Dutch cast iron stoves were very popular with the ruling class of the American Colonies during the mid-to-late 1700's -- They made all sorts of styles from grand to plain, but most had decorated castings.

Many had 'trick' openings and heat exchangers to maximize the way they heated your room.

Lloyd

Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh

2441 - tent peg 2442 - load binder
Reply to
Doug Miller
2437 Bartenders towel holder, also clamps to a towel rack 2438 Swedish fire axe. Trust the Swedes to make a modern looking design. 2439 Barrel plug from the 1800s 2440 coal burning stove 2441 "piton" for rock climbing. This was driven into cracks in the rock, and a rope tied on. 2442, early version of a "come along" tool, or chain hoist.
Reply to
Stormin Mormon

The patent has a different description of it

Crash axe is definitely correct, not sure if it's a Darley.

Yes

Nope

Close but not correct, I'm looking for a more specific answer as mentioned in the patent

Reply to
Rob H.

I don't know the answer for this item but I think it's too thick to be a piton.

Reply to
Rob H.
2440: I believe it's an old coal-fired water heater.

I swear I've seen one like it in one of the old Audel books -- specifically used to feed a radiator in an automobile garage to provide heat without the danger of fire, and also a similar one to provide hot water in a barber shop.

Northe

Reply to
Northe

Correct, it was marked 'antique water heater'.

Reply to
Rob H.

Just found out that it's actually gas powered, circa 1915.

Reply to
Rob H.
[snip]

Really? These things are a couple of bucks apiece at practically every antique/collectible/junk shop. I think there's some law requiring a bin of these things be present in every junk shop as a condition of licensing.

Reply to
Paul Hovnanian P.E.

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.