What is it? Set 480

A new set has been posted on the site:

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Rob

Reply to
Rob H.
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2791: I think it might be a firefighting bulldozer, and the 'devices' are for tracking it's position via GPS.

Erik

Reply to
Erik

2795: Think I remember seeing something like this on one of those 'home improvement' shows... and is for cracking/splitting larger stones/rocks.

Erik

Reply to
Erik

2792 the hole on the dvd tray is there so you can open it with a paper clip.

Paul K. Dickman

Reply to
Paul K. Dickman

"Rob H." wrote in news:76744f74-ccbe-4bc6-acb1- snipped-for-privacy@googlegroups.com:

2792 -- the hole is to provide access to the manual eject switch: push a thin metal rod such as an unfolded paper clip into the hole, and the tray opens.
Reply to
Doug Miller

metal rod such as

I thought it was a special model for use in basements like mine, and the hole was to let the water run out.

Reply to
Ed Huntress
2791, used for washing the inside of traffic tunnels. 2792, if the tray jams, you can push in a paper clip for manual eject? Pressure equalization so the computer doesn't inflate? 2793, SWAG is this is early printing press. 2794, needle for early sewing machine? 2795, no clue. 2796, broken part of a clock. Or maybe a horizon finder for naval vessels.

Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus

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Rob

Reply to
Stormin Mormon

2791 - Well the blade is for pushing and moving whatever you want, Dirt, sand, snow, zombies... The two items on top are automatic blade control receivers. The old versions used a local transmitter to send out a laser beam that they would pick up and then the remotes controlled the blade to keep the material level within an inch or better. The current units use GPS receivers to do the same thing. The GPS ones are nice because you can actually program in grades and slopes and not have to reset anything. 2792 - Same reason they are on the CD drives. They are to release the drive tray if for some other reason it will not open (power or equipment failure) They are sized for a common paper clip as well. Straighten the first large loop and you have a release tool. 2793 - High speed circumcision tool ?

2794 - Not sure if it's the correct use but the one I have gets used like a seam ripper

2795 -

2796 -

Reply to
Steve W.

2793 has me intrigued. The mechanism turns by a handcrank (not present) which gears up to the flywheel. . Rotation of the flywheel simultaneously advances the vertical shaft via a ratchet and feedscrew, and drives the cutting blade with a bar attached to a crankshaft.

My guess is that the vertical shaft drives a round punch and that the machine is used for cutting and punching square nuts or washers from flat steel.

Paul K. Dickman

Reply to
Paul K. Dickman

Ed Huntress wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com:

metal rod such as

It works for that, too, though it's not the primary purpose.

Reply to
Doug Miller

Well, 2791 is a cat with GPS receivers. These are used in the Sacramento valley rice fields to initially level the huge fields that will be flood irrigated later on.

Smaller fields used a central laser unit in the center of the field, but huge fields need something with a greater range.

The controller uses the GPS info to raise or lower or tilt the blade.

Paul

Reply to
Paul Drahn

The steel wedges with rings look like a set of rock splitter's "feathers".

Lloyd

Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh

Correct but I don't think it's specifically for firefighting.

Reply to
Rob H.

According to the patent it wasn't invented to be a seam ripper.

Reply to
Rob H.

It's for working on wood, it came from France and was used by wine makers.

Reply to
Rob H.

Did they make feathers out of wood? The only ones that I've seen before were made of metal.

Reply to
Rob H.

Posting from rec.crafts.metalworking as always.

2791) Hmm ... not large enough diameter to have much power for driving the blade down into the dirt.

Too close together to show get distinctive readings from a GPS satellite.

However -- it could be something similar -- working in relation with transponders on the corners of the work area, to give precise position information -- either to the operator, or to someone back at the site office trailer. Perhaps for avoiding buried gas or power lines, or perhaps for recording the information for archeological purposes.

2792) O.K. *This* one I *know*. Its function is to open the drive when the button won't or can't. Perhaps the computer OS has it locked to ignore the button, or perhaps the drive has failed, or perhaps there is no power to the computer.

It is present on pretty much any CD-ROM drive made in recent years. I forget whether the ones which accepted holders for the CDs also had that, but they probably did.

When you need to open the drive, unbend a paper clip, and push in firmly through that hole until it clicks. At that point, the tray will open a little, and you can pull it out the rest of the way.

2793) A machine to progressively cut deeper and deeper into something. The blade moves up and down a short distance with every rotation of the wheel, and also each rotation (probably on the upstroke) advances the ratchet fed screw, to move the blade a little deeper. I suspect that this is because the workpiece is tough enough so it could not be cut in a single stroke in a machine this small (lacking hydraulics). I suspect that it is a chisel to cut steel bars. It looks as though the large wheel is grooved to act as a pulley, so it is belt driven.

2794) Hmm ... I *think* that the pin on the side in the eye of the long pin is eccentric, so the long pin will move as the lever is rotate. This allows the end of the split part to fit into a hole a bit smaller, and then when the lever is operated the pin forces the sides apart to lock it into the hole. This allows the handle to be used to pull whatever the hole is in -- which presumably has no easy access for otherwise pulling it.

It operates somewhat like a Cleco -- except for the lack of the spring operating it.

2795) Not at all sure about this. Sort of like a hammer or ax handle, except for the ring -- which may be to keep the handle from pulling out in a poor fit.

2796) Looks to me to be a form of strength tester. You pull the knobs apart, the hand rotates CCW and pushes the extra hand to record the maximum level.

If you push the knobs together, the hand rotates clockwise, and has to travel a greater distance to reach the scale. I can't get enough resolution to see the units of the scale - -if any.

Now to post and then see what others have suggested.

Enjoy, DoN.

Reply to
DoN. Nichols

I suppose the vertical shaft would work for punching corks out of bark. But the production rate would have been abysmal and the cutting blade would have been counter productive.

Unless the shaft just held and rotated the cork as the cutter pared it down to round. That would make more sense as the cutters strokes would be timed by the crankshaft to each click of the ratchet, I guess you could use the same motion for cutting bungs but either way, the production rate would have been slow.

Paul K. Dickman

Reply to
Paul K. Dickman

"DoN. Nichols" wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@Katana.d-and-d.com:

I *do* remember, and yes, they definitely did. At least the ones that I used.

Reply to
Doug Miller

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