What is this thing

Recently in an auction I bid on a skid of stuff, some of which I wanted and others I didn't pay attention to.

Won the lot and started sorting.

Ran into this thing

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Google is so far unhelpful.

Not showing is the bottom which has a round hole in it.

Anyone?

Reply to
Marc Britten
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Marc Britten wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@gSPAMmail.com:

It's a trepan drill. Or hole saw or BTA drill depending on where you are from.

It is used to drill large holes in plate. It takes less power to drill a large diameter than a conventional drill, and leaves a slug which can often be used to make something else.

Reply to
D Murphy

D. Murphy is right.

Reply to
Wayne Lundberg

Masonary core drill. You need the arbor that goes with it, and the pilot drill.

Reply to
Tony

The hole saws that I'm familiar with are much much lest robust that this thing appears to be, which is why I was a bit confused I guess.

I was guessing concrete, like many others here. What makes you so sure its a metal drill?

Reply to
Marc Britten

While I'm on the subject of what the....

I also just found 2 "taps" (labeled 10-32) they look almost like drills with thread cutters on the ends.

I know I'm a rank beginner at this stuff but I've never seen a tap like that before.

Reply to
Marc Britten

It is a annular cutter used to cut holes in metal. They work like a hole saw in that the produce a center slug. The advantage is that they require much less power to drill a hole than an equivalent sized twist drill and produce a better hole than a hole saw. Magnetic drills such as those made by Hougen use the same type of cutter. I am almost sure it is not a concrete core bit in that the carbide tooth geometry is wrong for concrete.

Reply to
craftsman_ron

This sounds like "spiral flute taps", see

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for some examples.

Regards, Bob Headrick

Reply to
Bob Headrick

I agree

Gunner

The aim of untold millions is to be free to do exactly as they choose and for someone else to pay when things go wrong.

In the past few decades, a peculiar and distinctive psychology has emerged in England. Gone are the civility, sturdy independence, and admirable stoicism that carried the English through the war years . It has been replaced by a constant whine of excuses, complaints, and special pleading. The collapse of the British character has been as swift and complete as the collapse of British power.

Theodore Dalrymple,

Reply to
Gunner

Marc Britten wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@gSPAMmail.com:

I've changed my mind. It's a concrete hollow hammer core bit.

Reply to
D Murphy

It looks like a metal cutting drill, but the angles on the front of the carbides looks very negitive, and there is no route to evacuate the chips?? So it could be a concrete bit.

Reply to
James P Crombie

i've changed my mind too!

Reply to
rustyjames

Could be a "Drap", a combination drill & tap in one tool. See

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They make "Dreamers" (drill / reamer) too!

Carmine Castiglia InfosystemsPro LLC PalmOS apps for engineers and machinists.

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Reply to
Carmine Castiglia

Cool! I learn something every day!

Gunner

"The importance of morality is that people behave themselves even if nobody's watching. There are not enough cops and laws to replace personal morality as a means to produce a civilized society. Indeed, the police and criminal justice system are the last desperate line of defense for a civilized society. Unfortunately, too many of us see police, laws and the criminal justice system as society's first line of defense." --Walter Williams

Reply to
Gunner

Weird, my eyes must have glazed right over that option, I actually went to MSC to try and figure it out.

Thanks for helping me.

Reply to
marc.britten

Hello, Marc! You wrote on Mon, 10 Jul 2006 17:55:57 -0500:

MB> Won the lot and started sorting.

MB> Ran into this thing

MB>

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MB> Google is so far unhelpful.

MB> Not showing is the bottom which has a round hole in it.

Concrete core cutter - as it says on the label. Used for extracting cores for testing suspect concrete compression strength.

With best regards, mweb. E-mail: snipped-for-privacy@home.com

Reply to
mweb

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