Yesterday in the shop


Yesterday was good. Worked on a nose protector for my lathe.
Part of this as a general idea.
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Indicated the spindle nose to set the compound (L-00 16d 35' 40" included).
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Installed boring bar upside down facing away to cut the mirror of the taper.
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I've moved the cross away to measure.
I think I need to do some housecleaning. Should have seen it with the balls of
aluminum
chips. That Pepsi bottle has way oil in it. Just in case you wondered what it
is doing
there.
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Threading was interesting. A 3 3/4-6 thread is wide enough I couldn't pick up
my thread
wires with my micrometer. Finally I used a scale as a bridge and did a relative
measurement over wires with the driving plate shown in the chip pan. I got it
right. :)
The L00 has a drive key but you can take it out. I installed my nose protector
and the
threads worked but it wasn't seating on the taper. I faced off .050 and tried
again.
Now if fits okay, decided to part it but my AXA parting tool is only a 3/32 x
1/2. I got
greedy, it broke.
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I have a 1/8x1/2 parting tool on order but I may just take it over to uncles and
band saw
it off. I'd probably have done that today but my throat feels like someone
poured the
contents of a lead casting pot down it.
I'm going to mill down some round stock to 3/8" sq at the end to stick in my
tool holder
and use the carriage as a slotter to cut the drive key slot really soon now.
After I hit an impasse, I decided to replace the cross feed screw in my
bridgeport. It
didn't have good oiling when I got it and the middle of the screw was knife
edged. Took a
couple tries to get the split half nuts oriented and spaced so that I had travel
in the
adjustment screw and lock screw. Tip, a bit of hot melt to secure your screw to
screw
driver is priceless. Dropping your screws in your knee sucks. I'm just
guessing, didn't
do it :)
Wes
Reply to
Wes
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1/2. I got
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and band saw
edged. Took a
guessing, didn't
Time well spent. I did much the same some years ago for the L00 fitting on my older lathe when I was making a mount for metal spinning mandrels, I made it in steel though which made cutting the keyway more interesting with a tool in the toolholder and moving the carriage. Worked well though and has a 1" x 8TPI thread in the face to mount the mandrels on.
I wonder if you need the keyway anyway, as it's only a protector can you not just relieve the inside taper to clear the key. From the L fitting drawing it looks like you have some room on the taper before and after the key to support the protector or are you looking to do a "proper job" for the challenge of it.
Reply to
David Billington
Did your tool have any rake?
What kind of things do you spin? Bells for musical instruments?
I could run a long endmill down to relieve it as you suggest. However, I've always wanted to try cutting a keyway with a lathe. After all, it is for my entertainment.
Wes
Reply to
Wes
Wear a leather glove on the hand you crank the carriage with . A short stiff boring bar works well to hold the cutter - be sure it's centered in the bore or the keyway will be angled ... I ground a couple of degrees of relief on my cutter last time I did this .
Reply to
Snag
How's that work? Oh, like this,
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Mike
Reply to
amdx
Yes IIRC, just like any other to make the cutting easier.
Tankards, soffieta (a glass blowing tool) I have a website http:/
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, it's really hobby stuff although I do make items for people when asked if I have the time, actually many items shown on the site are items I've been asked to do. I have spun one item like a trumpet horn, it was the top to a lamp, but the same shape. Brass is a PITA as it work hardens rapidly so you spend maybe 90% of the time annealing it as opposed to spinning with a shape like that from flat sheet. I only made the one and it came out right first time so I was being cautious and having a good day.
always wanted
With mine in steel removing as much as possible with an endmill made life much easier, I would be inclined to do the same for aluminium, or even aluminum, as even though your lathe is a similar size it's not really the tool for the job and gets tiresome quickly.
Let us know how you get on.
Cheers,
Dave
Reply to
David Billington
This is an ID key way. Lathes are versatile.
Wes -- "Additionally as a security officer, I carry a gun to protect government officials but my life isn't worth protecting at home in their eyes." Dick Anthony Heller
Reply to
Wes
Just realized I can use a boring bar. My biggest bar only holds a .250 bit but I figure I can slide the tool holder up and down my AXA post to finish out the sides.
I'll use minimum overhang.
Thanks,
Wes -- "Additionally as a security officer, I carry a gun to protect government officials but my life isn't worth protecting at home in their eyes." Dick Anthony Heller
Reply to
Wes

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