Made a Turner's cube

It is 2" in size.
https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/vhEDl09lZJkUlhyshEvrJdxO3bjAhN7B42H-ddOjxhE?feat=directlink

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https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/vhEDl09lZJkUlhyshEvrJdxO3bjAhN7B42H-ddOjxhE?feat=directlink
That is really, really cool. I also like the 'demo samples' the rapid prototyping guys have on their stands at exhibitions. Spheres within cubes within ellipsoids etc....
JB
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I saw some cool examples too.
The code to do it, is actually a recursive G code function (which is understandable, since the shapes are recursively nested).
(Makes a turner's cube. See projects.txt for formulas).
O<turners_cube> sub #<xc> = #1 (X Center) #<yc> = #2 (Y Center) #<z> = #3 (Current Z) #<size> = #4 (Side) #<milld> = #5 (Mill Diameter) #<k1> = #6 #<k2> = #7
#<R> = [#<k1> * #<size>/2]
O<if> if [ #<R> gt #<milld>] G0 X#<xc> Y#<yc> O<withdraw> call [#<z> + 0.01] #<d> = [ [#<x>/2 - #<R>] + #<k2>*#<R>*[1 - 1/sqrt[ 2 ]]]
O<deepcylindricalpocket> call [#<xc>] [#<yc>] [#<z> + 0.01] [#<z> - #<d>] [#<R>] [#<milld>]
#<X1> = [#<size> - 2*#<d>]
O<turners_cube> call [#<xc>] [#<yc>] [#<z> - #<d>] [#<X1>] [#<milld>] [#<k1>] [#<k2>] O<if> endif
G0 X#<xc> Y#<yc> O<withdraw> call [#<z> + 0.01] O<turners_cube> endsub
M2
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Ignoramus4120 wrote:

https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/vhEDl09lZJkUlhyshEvrJdxO3bjAhN7B42H-ddOjxhE?feat=directlink
That's cute. Surely you can get out your tiny end mills and work it down a few more levels...
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That's possible, but would add to the time expense. I was thinking, to try selling this stuff on ebay.
My work involved here, is to open the vise six times and flip the cubes in the vise.
i
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Ignoramus4120 wrote:

Dude, you have a 4th axis, only two vise changes required. Load part and machine sides 1-4, stop, flip part and machine sides 5 and 6.
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"Pete C." wrote:

Add to that, probably use custom soft jaws in the small vice on the 4th axis in order to properly locate the part. Also probably machine in AL, polish in a tumbler and anodize for sale.
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Oh, yes, I realize that I have a question. How can I make this cube beautiful, as in, remove manufacturers marks on the aluminum,. etc?
Tumbling? In what?
i
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Ignoramus4120 wrote:

I'd look at the large vibratory polisher / tumbler that HF sells (on sale now). It looks like it should be large enough to handle 2" cubes.
http://www.harborfreight.com/18-lb-vibratory-bowl-with-liquid-drain-hose-96923.html
I have the smaller version that I picked up for cleaning / polishing brass for reloading, but I haven't got around to using it yet. It looks decent enough at any rate.
http://www.harborfreight.com/5-lb-metal-vibrator-tumbler-67617.html
They also carry some assorted media for the tumblers, and of course you can get media from a lot of other places as well.
Polishing is the first step of course, after that you need some sort of finish to protect from rust or oxidation. There are a lot of options depending on what material you are making the parts from, look at the Caswell site for various ideas.
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Pete C. wrote:

http://www.harborfreight.com/18-lb-vibratory-bowl-with-liquid-drain-hose-96923.html
I had the Dillon vibratory polisher. I bought it to deburr aluminum workpieces. It was *way too* gentle for that. It took hours to make very little visible progress. Prolly just fine for putting the final polish on brass, though.
Next time, I will go with a real tumbler. Prolly get an old wood lathe and modify to suit:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=krGB_g7Dxlo

--Winston
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wrote:

I don't do tumbling, but everything I've read says that vibratory tumblers work more quickly than rotaries.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LE-aHXBDO30&NR=1
This big guy seems to work more quicky.

Um, that's not a wood lathe and I'll bet he goes through 5gal buckets several times before he has to change media in that thing.
Can't beat the price. I got my old wood lathe and two 1/3hp motors for $20 at a tailgate sale in Sandy Eggo.
-- "I probably became a libertarian through exposure to tough-minded professors" James Buchanan, Armen Alchian, Milton Friedman "who encouraged me to think with my brain instead of my heart. I learned that you have to evaluate the effects of public policy as opposed to intentions." -- Walter E. Williams
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Larry Jaques wrote:

Here's the actual cleaner. It is *dry use* only. There is a tiny size and capability difference, IMHO. :)
http://www.dillonprecision.com/#/content/p/9/pid/23658/catid/8/Dillon__039_s_CV_2001_Vibratory_Case_Cleaner

* Built pretty stoutly, * Says 'Logan' on the headstock, * Has a compound instead of a tool rest, * Capable of crawling along at ~50 RPM
You might be right, Larry. :)

That HDPE is pretty stout stuff.

Now that sounds promising!
--Winston
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That was called a poor man's deburring tumbler, but this poor man has a huge Logan lathe! Very clever, though.
i
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Ignoramus28184 wrote:

I have been using a plastic pail as a tumbler for years. I have a big enough lathe that I can chuck the pail and use the tailstock to hold the lid in place. A couple of 2x2 slats on the inside of the pail held in by some sheetrock screws makes the tumbler complete. I use it mainly for stamped parts that need deburring.
John
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PeteC, I do have a vibratory tumbler.
I may give it a try, but I afraid to damage the delicate cubes.
i
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in message

I:
That will depend entirely on the media you use and the time you're willing to devote to the process given the machinery deployed. But if you need to get deep milling marks out, you can count on angle sharpness suffering in the indiscriminacy of the process.
I looked for Turner's cubes on eBay once and only saw some cheesy plastics. You might try a metal with an apparent color turn away from aluminum, say bronze/brass, to gauge differential customer interest.
A nice historical blurb on the history of the cubes and their significance in evaluating a machinists skills would be good alongside some nice poetic quote about "world's within worlds", "atoms within mass", "geometric projection", etcetera. Punchy lines are great but the copywriter's guide is that interested clients will read all they find interesting. Your descriptive powers will not have insignificant result. If you ever read the blurbs accompanying the "pet rock" phenomenon, there's proof.
Regards,
Edward Hennessey
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Ignoramus4120 wrote:

Bead blasting will give it a matte finish.
Hope This Helps! Rich
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Ignoramus4120 wrote:

Did I say beadblast?
http://mysite.verizon.net/richgrise/images/Soma-parts.jpg
Cheers! Rich
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On Sun, 20 Mar 2011 06:52:46 -0700, Rich Grise

That doesn't look anything like Huxley's brave new drug, Soma.
-- "A patriot must always be ready to defend his country against his government." --Edward Abbey
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I think that clamping this is to rotary table do difficult, that flipping the part over 6 times is easier.
If I wanted to make quantities, I would machine three cubes at a time, setting three in a row in a vise.
i
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