Fractional Caliper

"Now 'ere's a funny thing"- to quote the late, great Max Miller.
I was at the Taunton ME show earlier today and came across a new
product just received into stock by our old friends at Tracey Tools - a
digital caliper with the usual button to switch between imperial and metric
displays *and* a third toggle position to display fractions of an inch,
rising by sixty fourths, ie the display could read "2.375" or "2 3/8in" if
that was your preference.
They couldn't tell me the margin of error built into the algorithm,
which would dictate which dimension would be presented, higher or lower, if
the object measured just happened to fall between two figures. They were
being offered at £25.
I have yet to decide if my life can continue without one of these -
gold or gimmick ?
--
Chris Edwards (in deepest Dorset) "....there *must* be an easier way!"

Reply to
Chris Edwards
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The Wixey one has been about for a while, I have one of their angle gauges which is very useful.
More details of the wixey on this site
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Jason
Reply to
jasonballamy
Chris
I've just had a look at Jason's link. Even that one with 'four times accuracy' or what ever it says is only to + or - 2 thou if you look at the pictured examples. Looking more closely at the FAQ section, this is exactly what they claim for it in the text. See below
Quote: - "Why aren't the fractions displayed all the time? The fractions work in a unique but highly accurate manner. The fractions will only display when the decimal reading is within + or - .002" of the fractions decimal equivalent. For example, if the display is reading .740" it will not display the 3/4" ( .750" equivalent) until after the readout passes .745". Internally the readout is actually measuring in .001" increments so that the 3/4" does not turn on until .748" and turns off again at .752" This gives your fraction readings a very high level of accuracy."
They do sell products for woodworkers though! Be great for that, but a bit rough for metalwork.
Steve (Sheffield)
Reply to
Steve
I imagine that it is *really* funny if you move it. Jumping from 1/64 to 1/32 1/16 1/8 1/4 and 1/2 in a random order. That would drive me crazy and you would find that gadget in a dirty corner of my shop. Bent.
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller
Hopefully not too random ! I do agree though that it's not something that would find any use in my workshop. I always convert fractional values to decimal when working, and the handy conversion table at the front of the Zeus booklet is there for a reason !
AWEM
Reply to
Andrew Mawson
Thanks for the link and the information, Jason and Steve. Although I don't think I have much use for a fractional display, I can imagine that it might be *very* useful to somebody like Howard, who runs College Engineering, who usually has one of the busiest stalls at the larger ME shows, selling stock metals. I have already e-mailed him with the Wixey link. --
Chris Edwards (in deepest Dorset) "....there *must* be an easier way!"
Reply to
Chris Edwards
With a resolution of 1/64 you will get:
1/2 -> 33/64 -> 17/32 -> 35/64 -> 9/16 -> 37/64 -> 19/32 -> 39/64 -> 5/8 -> 41/64 -> 21/32 -> 43/64 -> 11/16 -> 45/64 -> 23/32 ... Not to forget the decimal numbers displayed in between.
To me, that looks random. But then, I'm not one of the inch-fraction. ;-)
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller
but Nick, that is NOT random, it's a progression, were it to be random it would not go constantly in one direction !
AWEM
Reply to
Andrew Mawson
What I would like is a caliper that I could use for checking the nominal size of stock. So when I put a bit of bar in it, it would automatically say 3/4" if the bar was 0.750" and 19mm if the bar was 0.748" etc. (and get it right).
That would be handy
Mark Rand RTFM
Reply to
Mark Rand
My guess is that you will get it soon after you take delivery of your flying pig ;-)
Regards, Tony
Reply to
Tony Jeffree
I have some calipers that fell to bits. Does that make them fractional?
Regards, Tony
Reply to
Tony Jeffree
It sounds very useful for finding out the "nominal" dimension of stock items.
i.e. not "measurement", but "identification", if you seem what I mean.
BugBear
Reply to
bugbear

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