gas supply to shed

I am thinking of fitting a gas heater (Balanced Flue) in my workshop and would like to run it on mains gas. Anyone done this, is there any reg's about gas pipes outside. Above or below ground.

Reply to
Bill
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In article , Bill writes

I have a copper gas pipe that runs around the outside of my house above ground (about 3 to 4 inches off the ground). It was fitted by a CORGI bloke a few years back, so I assume it was legal.

You do know that it *must* be fitted by a CORGI registered installer, yes?

Reply to
Nigel Eaton

Nigel Eaton said

Not STRICTLY true.

. . . it *must* be CONNECTED by a CORGI registered installer.

ie. You *could* do all the installation of the pipe and fittings right from the meter to the appliance but the final connection to the appliance - and pressure/leak testing - must be done by the CORGI man.

JG

Reply to
JG

Cover it in Denso tape - it's a tar impregnated fabric tape that is a bugger to apply but stops corrosion - I've got some pipe that runs outside of my house too...

...not sure if a Corgi guy has to do all the work, but has to certify boiler/heater installations...

Reply to
Robin

I find they respond well to a bowl of Winnalot & mentions of "Walkies"...

Regards, Tony

Reply to
Tony Jeffree

You can also use bitumastic paint, not as messy and easier to apply on the pipe passing through the wall. Best thing for Corgi's is a nice walk and a pint in the pub afterwards. hth Mike

Reply to
Mike W

In message , Robin writes

Better still, as it a new installation, use plastic covered copper pipe (proprietary name: Kuterlex) available from decent plumbers merchants.

Wrap any joints in Denso or PVC tape.

Regards,

Reply to
Pat Martindale

Not correct.

The work must be carried out by a **competent** person which has absolutely no legal definition in the relevant legislation.

If this work is done in the course of business i.e. for reward then the only competency requirements accepted by the Health and Safety Executive are those achieved by having CORGI registration.

There is absolutely nothing at all in any UK legislation to preclude anyone who is competent and not CORGI registered carrying out ANY work on domestic gas installations.

Reply to
Simon

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"Q. Is it legal to do DIY on appliances and/or flues ?

A. A competent person must carry out all work on gas appliances. It is always safer to use CORGI registered gas installers to carry out any gas work. Any employer or self-employed person, for example, a landlord, who carries out gas work must be CORGI registered."

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Reply to
Simon

Well not wanting to start nit picking any more but my Old English Sheepdog can knock seven shades of shit out of your Corgi.

With or without kippers for breakfast.

-- Regards,

John Stevenson Nottingham, England.

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Reply to
John Stevenson

Beware of gas heaters in workshops, they seem to encourage rusting, something to do with the combustion process. Took mine out many years ago and put in an electric radiator and had no rusting problems since. Alan

Reply to
Alan Marshall

"Beware of gas heaters in workshops, they seem to encourage rusting, "

mmmmm only if you got the temperature continuously going up and down .... this will cause a difference in the iron being cold and the newly heated moist air being warm .......and condensing on the cold surface. I suggest a thermostat ....this will keep all contents and air at the at same temp thereby stopping condensation. I would suggest 15 degrees cent...and be left on 24/7 all the best...mark

Reply to
mark

Assuming he's talking about unvented heaters that exhaust into the shop, it's the water from products of combustion. Electric's a lot dryer.

Pete Keillor

Reply to
Pete Keillor

In message , Alan Marshall writes

Main products of combustion are water and carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide dissolved in water becomes carbonic acid - a very weak acid but acid nonetheless.

Reply to
Mike H

"Electric's a lot dryer".

and a lot more expensive.

all the best....mark

Reply to
mark

You can (and should) insure against anything more expensive than rust in the workshop. Most of the expensive stuff is made of iron.

Got gas central heating in the house nearby? A bit of copper pipe insulated against freezing and a heater with a thermostatically-controlled valve set low aren't that expensive to buy or run.

Neither is a low powered greenhouse type electric heater, which in quite a few (but not all) situations will be all that you need to keep the rust off.

Don't use any kind of fuel-burning portable heater though, they give off water and carbon dioxide, the two main promoters of rust. And carbon monoxide, the main cause of heater-related death (other than not having enough money to pay for heating in a cold winter).

Reply to
Peter Fairbrother

Only those that do not exhaust outside. Remember that each pound of gas produces roughly a pound of water. If that water is not vented then rusting can be guaranteed no matter what temperature is maintained.

Cliff Coggin.

Reply to
Cliff Coggin

Two and a quarter pounds of water these days, what with natural gas:

CH4 + 2 O2 -> CO2 + 2 H2O mw:

16 -> 36

Arrr - and the CO2 makes it all happen much faster!

Reply to
Peter Fairbrother

I'm not too happy about copper pipework for external gas piping, it corrodes badly enough indoors, without being outdoors.

I think that stainless or galvanised steam barrel would be better and more likely to withstand the occasional knock.

CORGI installers can check installations before switching on, but most prefer to discuss what you are going to do 'before' you actually get the tools out, so they can steer you away from problem areas.

Our guy let us do most of the boiler installation but he ran the gas pipes himself, simply because we weren't around at the time and it saved time after the old heater system (warm air) packed up one winter's day.

I feel a story coming on....

Called British Gas after we had heater failure one Saturday morning, enter "engineer" in BG van, looked at boiler and said that it was shot, turned off the gas, told us not to use it and left. So there we were, no hot water, no shower, no heating, in January. Not so much as a word of help or suggestions about getting a repair done, he just wanted to get back home!

So, we spoke to Dave, our plumber guy in Luton, he came up and we got the replacement system working within 7 days which was all new radiators and piping. When we had a call from BG about a repair, 1 WEEK after the guy had cut the gas off, we very politely told him where to stick his 'service' and put the phone down. Haven't had anyone from them in the house since, although we still get the gas from them (through gritted teeth)

Peter

-- Peter & Rita Forbes Email: snipped-for-privacy@easynet.co.uk Web:

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Reply to
Peter A Forbes

I made this mistake some years ago with a standard brick single skin garage. I got the guts out of one of those wheel round gas heaters. They are made for butane but I got the tech department to mod one for me to run off propane.

Fitted the heater to a spare blank spot on the wall, drilled a hole thru and sited the bottle outside just like a good boy. Lit it checked it and watched it for a while then disappeared into the house to get a coffee whist the place warmed up. Came out 20 minutes later to a puddle under the gas bottles at the far end and the Myford and mill had a nice layer of brown stain oxide already on the beds. The place was ringing wet thru, even the painted surfaces had standing condensation on them.

Fortunately it did clean up Ok as it was such a short time span. That was the end of that. Shortly after I had to make room for a large chest freezer as it wouldn't go in the house. Not a happy bunny about loosing space like this but after a while it became apparent that the heating effect of the freezer coils was enough to stop condensation for most of the year.

Another point I have noticed is that about 2 or 4 times a year, spring and autumn there is a point where you get a rapid change of temperature that courses heavy condensation. It always seems to happen on a mild day. - onset of summer or winter ?

I would imagine that the newer balanced flue heaters that vent outside won't do this but can't comment as I have never used one in a workshop environment.

It seems that you need indirect heating to achieve minimum condensation although at the moment I'm running a large sawdust burning stove that's chimney vented although there is an internal flame to the shop. I'm truly amazed with this as I get no condensation at any point thru the year to the point I never have to oil up for protection, only for use. Visitors to my workshop can attest to the efficiency of this heater, you have to run past it on a cold day also given the fact it has to handle getting about 20 tonnes of material and machinery up to working temperature every day as it's a full time working shop.

Also given that I'm in the centre of a large furniture manufacturing area and they have to pay to get rid of waste beech wood. Animal people don't want beech, only soft woods so they even drop van loads off to get rid. Thank you...thank you.... thank you...........

-- Regards,

John Stevenson Nottingham, England.

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Reply to
John Stevenson

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