How to remove the Apron from a Boxford AUD?

I am trying to remove the Apron from a Boxford AUD with the Norto
GearBox.
I don't have a manual, but a copy of the Boxford 'Know your Lathe'.
All the advice says its very simple but doesn't tell you how.
I presume that you remove the handwheels from the outside (left han
thread on the clutch starwheel) and the feed change lever and separat
it from the saddle and just ease it off.
However the feed change lever doesn't want to come off even though
have taken the grubscrew off. Is it secured by a pin as well?
Any useful advice welcomed
--
rss
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
rsss's Profile:
formatting link
this thread:
formatting link

Reply to
rsss
Loading thread data ...
MMM
read somewhere that you just remove lead screw handwheel ... then wind the whole lot off the end of the lathe.
all the best.mark
Reply to
mark
Hi, not had mine apart yet but if you have a look here it just seems to be a couple of bolts and the right hand leadscrew bear
formatting link
regards
Keith
Reply to
jontom_1uk
You need to remove the complete saddle and apron rather than try and split the assembly on the lathe - the saddle stops the apron coming off by itself anyway
Remove/loosen the gib strip from the back of the saddle - 2 screws with a 5/16" hex key
Remove the right hand leadscrew support
Wind the whole lot off the end of the bed
Replace the lead screw support
Remove the top slide/toolpost first if you are a weakling
If there is a leadscrew thread indicator this should be removed as it tends to get in the way.
The gearbox is just three socket headed screws 1/4" iirc (the same size as the right hand leadscrew support)
Unless the headstock is removed you almost certainly won't be able to refit the gearbox single handed
Reply to
Mike
There may also be a location dowel in the RH leadscrew support bearing - it unscrews from above and needs to be taken out before winding the carriage off as it clouts something (can't remember what) in the back of the apron.
Richard
Reply to
Richard
I did this recently on my AUD mkIII and it wasn't too difficult. The saddle came off first- two big cap screws securing it to the apron, the carriage clamp and the rear gib strip. Saddle lifts sraight off. You probably want to support the apron now. The lead screw support is removed and the apron is slid off the end. Turn the handwheel as you go.
I was initially concerned that there would need to be some end float adjustment when replacing the lead screw support but it was OK.
Archie
Reply to
Archie
Hmm, never seen that in the half dozen or so Boxfords I've come across over the years.
Reply to
Mike
Doing it that way can cause the leadscrew to bend under the weight of the apron, sliding the whole lot off the bed is much more gentle!
I forgot about the carriage clamp though - that hangs up on something at the RHS of the bed.
Reply to
Mike
In my case, I already had the saddle off before I figure out that the apron had to slide off the end. I did say to support the apron though and my way, it is less of a hernia job. Either way, a third hand would help to support the leadscrew while the apron is removed.
Not sure what you meant by your comment "- the saddle stops the apron coming off by itself anyway"
Reply to
Archie
to slide off the end. I did say to support the apron
help to support the leadscrew while the apron is
off by itself anyway"
If you just remove the cap screws fixing the saddle to the apron and do nothing to the saddle gib strip screws the apron won't physically clear the saddle - the gear drive to the cross slide power feed pinion stops it sliding sideways more than an inch or so - not a problem on a model C of course.
The leadscrew can at a push pivot/bend under the weight of the apron to give some clearance, maybe just enough in very long bed non gearbox models but nowhere near enough in standard bed and gearbox models for the power feed gear to completely miss the saddle. I saw someone do that many, many years ago and cringed as they bent their leadscrew! Supporting the leadscrew is a good thing at all times but I've found that sliding the saddle and apron off in one assembly is much easier - it's heavy but with the topslide removed not unmanageable, plus the leadscew is supported right up to the last few inches meaning an untrained assistant can cope with 'hang onto that' while you put the saddle and apron on the floor.
Reply to
Mike
I've done it now, even remembered to support the lead screw befor removing the saddle so it didn't flop about too much.
Thanks to all the advisers, I was sure the apron came off withou undoing the leadscrew, but that is certainly the easy way.
Now to clean it
-- rss ----------------------------------------------------------------------- rsss's Profile:
formatting link
this thread:
formatting link
Reply to
rsss

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.