Insulation

Now I've finally moved I'm sorting out my workshop. I now have an outside workshop, which is a brick built double garage. I'm going to dryline it to
make it warmer and less damp (also running a dehumidifier full time on the damp front). I intend to screw 2" batons to the walls and then 12mm chipboard sheets fixed to the batons. I had intended to put loft insulation between the brick wall and the chipboard, but have run into a couple of problems. Firstly it only seems to come in 100mm / 4" thick rolls now (not 2") and secondly it works out very expensive (I have 70' of wall to cover, and I'm going to 8' high -which is a lot of sqr ft. of insulation).
Does anyone have any suggestions for a more economical insulation to put in there, or failing that how well would just a 2" air gap and the chipboard sheets help to insulate it?
Regards
Kevin
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On Sat, 26 Jun 2004 19:56:35 +0100, "Kevin Steele"

I don't know how much it costs now, but you shouldn't have any problem getting Rockwool in 2" thick. That's what I used for a similar job in my workshop. Much pleasanter to handle than glass fibre insulation.
If you get blank looks when enquiring, ask for 'partial fill cavity batts' at a decent builders' merchants.
HTH Tim
Tim Leech Dutton Dry-Dock
Traditional & Modern canal craft repairs
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Don't forget a vapour barrier and maybe 'tank' the inside of the wall before you start. You need to keep the insulation dry.
--
73
Brian
G8OSN
www.g8osn.org.uk
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You could try the 8' X 4' X 1" expanded polystyrene sheets sold for the purpose you mention.

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On Sat, 26 Jun 2004 19:56:35 +0100, "Kevin Steele"

Kevin
Have you costed up the 8 x 4 sheets of plaster board with insulation on the back. They make a powdered glue you mix up like plaster and gob it on the walls. When I did part of my workshop I managed to get some damaged sheets from the depot are reduced cost. These had chipped corners etc but you often have to trim. You have to visit the Depot the week before you need them and kick a few in when no one is looking, then go back the following week and ask if they have any damaged ones :-)

-- Regards,
John Stevenson Nottingham, England.
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On Sat, 26 Jun 2004 20:20:43 +0100, John Stevenson

Here in the France all new houses are lined with this stuff. I t has 100 mm of polystyrene and a moisture barrier built in. It works very well but don't expect to be able to fix heavily laden shelves to it.
Russell.
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On Sat, 26 Jun 2004 19:56:35 +0100, "Kevin Steele"

You might try polyurethane, which is fairly impervious to moisture as well. May not be cheaper, but is much better insulation.
http://www.secondsandco.co.uk/Pages/company.html
Haven't tried them, but seriously considered them before going to structural insulated panels for my new workshop.
Mark Rand RTFM
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Thank you to everyone who replied, either on-list or by e-mail. Many useful suggestions. After looking into some options the following seems about the best value for money solution. I will seal the walls with a paint on sealant (just to make sure no moisture gets through) then line them with 40mm of polystyrene which I will cover with 12mm chipboard. 8'x4' 40mm polystyrene sheets are just over 5 each and 12mm chip is just under 5 a sheet. Although chipbeard isn't as good as plywood, it is about a quarter of the cost and much better than the only other alternative at this price -plasterboard. All I have to do now is clear enough space to put twenty sheets of each while I fit them to the walls (needs to come in one lot to minimise delivery charges).
Regards
Kevin
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wrote:

We used to buy shuttering ply or "good one side" plywood. Cosmetically it is usually OK on one side and rough on t'other, but cheaper than regular ply and better than chipboard.
Peter
-- Peter & Rita Forbes snipped-for-privacy@easynet.co.uk Engine pages for preservation info: http://www.oldengine.org/members/diesel
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I lined my basement witn reject grade ply. One thing to do is to paint it - use the cheapest white acrylic housepaint you can get. It helps a lot with lightening the place up a bit. I also painted the floor with a light grey epoxy paint. Also recommended as it makes cleaning up a lot easier, seals and protects the concrete a bit. Follow the instructions for etching and mixing v. carefully. Geoff
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Hello Kevin, What are you doing to damp proof the floor? Cheers GeoffH Norfolk - UK
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If I could see enough of it I might try and paint it <G>

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On Tue, 6 Jul 2004 22:26:18 +0100, "Kevin Steele"
ROTFL. You sound as bad a John S !? Must admit I'm not far behind :-)
Are you only going to paint it? Nothing else? GeoffH
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wrote:

. . . mmmm . . how can you ROTFL if you can't see the floor !!!!!!!!!
Andrew Mawson
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On Wed, 7 Jul 2004 13:19:24 +0000 (UTC), "Andrew Mawson"
Nice one. I like it. Curled up very tight. Like a dormouse. [nearly spelled that doormouse :-)] GeoffH
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Should I be doing anything else? As it is such a new building (2 year old brick built double garage) I thought it would be fairly OK. It would be nice to put polystyrene insulation down and flooring grade chipboard, possibly capped off with oil tempered hardboard -but my budget is pretty well blown just lining the walls (5 a sheet doesn't sound much till you work out how many sheets you need).
Regards
Kevin

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On Thu, 8 Jul 2004 21:38:49 +0100, "Kevin Steele"
No idea. Was hoping someone in the ng would offer advise. I'm not using my garage as a workshop yet, but the underside of cardboard boxes on the floor have rotted away from damp.

I wouldn't have thought the age of building would prevent damp ingress via unsealed floor.

Sound like a good method. Hope someone comments or gives suggestions Damp cold coming up would be my concern.

Yeah sounds nice and cheap per sheet, and then you start adding up. Luckily I will only have to insulate one long side and one short side. My garage is on the side of bungalow so that wall is cavity.
What are you doing about the main garage door? Mine is the normal up and over, so will either take it down and brick up and fit double doors, or fix polystyrene sheets to it and use draught strips on edges. Cheers GeoffH
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On Fri, 9 Jul 2004 09:00:53 +0000 (UTC), GeoffH

We laid a new floor in the main workshop when we rebuilt the old Church Hall at the back of the house. A very heavy duty membrane was laid to make sure we had no damp problems, and so far it's been pretty good.
We walls are double brick but we can't see any damp course, so we had the exterior rendered as well.
We would like to seal the floor properly and put screed over it all, but at present it's just bare concrete with an Applied Chemicals concrete sealer over the top, which works great.
Peter -- Peter A Forbes Prepair Ltd, Luton, UK snipped-for-privacy@easynet.co.uk http://www.prepair.co.uk
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In my last house I sealed up the edges of the up & over door with the expanding foam sealer that you get in DIY shops. It worked very well and stopped all the draughts getting in. Of course, you can't open the door after doing this -when I moved I had to cut the door open with a hacksaw blade, but it cut easily didn't take too long. To keep things warm you would need to put polystyrene sheets on to insulate it. Cheaper than bricking up, and you can always open the door if you ever need to (big machines in or out for example).
I have two separate doors in this garage, one I will be sealing up but the other I want to use so it will have to be insulated and have draught strips round the edges.
Regards
Kevin

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Kevin, What type of lighting are you going to use, and how many? My garage is only 17' x 10' so won't need as many as you. Does anyone in the ng have any advise on what type of tubes to use? Should spot lighting be used for specific areas? ie lathe, milling etc Regards Geoff
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