Q&S Hacksaw available

Anyone after a Quilters & Smith 6 hacksawing machine?
Almost certainly 3 phase. Ex school machine available for a sensible donation to school funds.
To be collected from Southampton area Photo on request. bobdotminchinatntlworlddotcom
Regards
Bob
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Bob Minchin wrote:

I have the 8" Qualters & Smith hacksaw. They made two versions: the "light duty saw" with serial numbers beginning "LDS" and the "heavy duty saw" with serial numbers beginning "HDS". The following digit of the serial number is the cutting capacity in inches. For example, my saw carries the number HDS 8 2505.
The light duty saw is really nothing of the sort. It's still a big and heavy machine. I believe the light duty saw had a cutting capacity of 6" round stock, and the two heavy duty saws 8" and 10". There were also a few minor variations over the years. My 8" saw weighs somewhere between 400 and 500 kg. Qualters & Smith are now owned by Birkett Cutmaster. As of a few years ago, they still kept a few parts and manuals for the hacksaws.
These are good machines. Much less troublesome than used bandsaws. Buy one and you won't need to buy another.
Best wishes,
Chris
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Christopher Tidy wrote:

Thanks for helping with the sales pitch!! LOL
Sorry there is no sales commission I can split with you, I'm just passing on the info.
So far no one has put their hand up to say they want this saw. Do you want a second one?
Bob
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Bob Minchin wrote:

I'm tempted, but I think I'm going to have to refuse. With some regret. Money is a bit tight at the moment and I have no way of collecting it. And as I have an 8" single phase machine, a 6" three phase machine is of limited use.
The only problem these machines ever have is with the hydraulic relief cylinder. Like I say, they last forever.
Hope someone claims it. You could try eBay if you don't get any interest on this group. There is a some demand for them on eBay.
Is this one of the grey machines, or the later green "Bulldog"?
Best wishes,
Chris
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Christopher Tidy wrote:

I know what you mean Chris, I'm getting to the point where I don't need/can't fit in much more stuff. I've posted a picture here
http://homepage.ntlworld.com/bob.minchin/SAW%20Q&S%20No6IMG_1117.JPG
I think I have someone interested who is just starting on the nursery slopes of machine collecting! LoL
Bob
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Thank heavens for that. Now I can stop having to resist the temptation to respond.
Has the vice screw handle got asbestos, botulism or something???
Mark Rand RTFM
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LOL!! The machines are in a school which has had an attack of elfinsafety. The lathes have had the power feed and screwcutting disabled. backgear selectors screwed down etc. The saw vice has been marked because it is at shin level. The power is padlocked off. It is being disposed of as if it jams they say it can throw the job across the room. The replacement - a band saw just stalls and breaks the blade which is safer according to the head of dept.
Regards
Bob
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Bob Minchin wrote:

I cannot see how a bandsaw is safer than a power hacksaw. Those vices have deep jaws and grip very firmly. Usually the hacksaw blade will break before anything jumps out of the vice. Some bandsaws are also enormous and clumsy, but then I've never been a fan of bandsaws. And if a hacksaw is dangerous because a piece of work can jump out of the vice, surely a lathe is dangerous for the same reason?
The only hazard I can see with that machine is that it doesn't have the finger guard at the rear end of the bowslide which was fitted to later machines. This isn't a problem when the machine is mounted with its rear against a wall, but it could pose a threat if the rear of the machine is accessible. I wouldn't regard this as a major threat, but it's something that it's worth being aware of.
That machine is the little brother to mine. Possibly a slightly earlier model. Mine has a more angular base. That one is certainly 1960s or earlier. It looks like it has been well looked after. Should provide many years of trouble-free service in a home workshop.
If the new owner needs any help, feel free to pass on my details.
Best wishes,
Chris
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On or around Wed, 07 May 2008 19:02:18 GMT, Bob Minchin

I'd love it but the logistics and cost are against it.
it's one of those that sits there going "gronch,gronch,gronch" and chewing through unfeasibly big lumps of steel, isn't it.
and IME, it's bits of blade that fly all over the shop when you get it wrong, not the job itself.
Broken blades, suitably ground and fitted with handles, make vicious kinves for piscatorial types.
--
Austin Shackles. www.ddol-las.net my opinions are just that
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